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  2. This Company Turns the 2021 Toyota Tacoma Into One Posh Overlander

This Company Turns the 2021 Toyota Tacoma Into One Posh Overlander

Prepare to write a hefty check, though, because TruckHouse BCT's kit costs about as much as a Lamborghini.

We at Automobile love big adventure rigs. After all, these vehicles subscribe to such a wonderful automotive recipe. Take something ostensibly ordinary (a 2021 Toyota Tacoma) and garnish it with something extraordinary (a miniaturized house). Cue the TruckHouse BCT: a made to order, carbon-fiber-clad, go anywhere, do anything home away from home.

The concept is simple, and in a time where flying to some exotic destination isn't the easiest method of "getting away," it makes a lot of sense. First, you need a truck. In this case, TruckHouse chose the most popular mid-size truck on the market as its starting point. The Toyota Tacoma, even in TRD Pro guise, isn't our favorite truck to take off the beaten path, but it carries with it Toyota's reputation for longevity. Plus, it is extremely well supported by the aftermarket as TruckHouse beautifully demonstrates here.

The whole thing is made to order, and comes in various different "stages." Stage One is available on either the base TRD Access Cab or the TRD Sport. TruckHouse then adds 33-inch tires, long-travel suspension, a custom fabricated rear axle, a new rear bumper, and what the company calls a "reinforced chassis." Stage Two has everything from Stage One but adds 35-inch tires, an air compressor, a front winch, a snorkel, a modified front bumper that gives a better approach angle, and an extended-range fuel tank.

Stage Three, as you might imagine, carries over everything from Stage One and Two, but requires you donate a Tacoma TRD Pro. Anything less than that simply won't do, apparently. TruckHouse then sets about adding even tougher front and rear winches, auxiliary lighting, upgraded front and rear "lockers" (we're talking differentials, not the place you stored your textbooks in between classes), and a "trophy" long-travel suspension kit.

And that's just what the company does to the truck itself. In order to make way for your "house," the Taco's bed is removed and a carbon-fiber-reinforced composite mini-house replaces it. Your new abode comes with seven dual-pane safari-style windows, an oven, a skylight, a "marine grade" drawer fridge and freezer, dimmable LED lighting, a galley sink, a lithium-ion battery pack, and solar paneling to charge it up.

Optional extras include a 32.0-inch television, heated floors (not kidding), air conditioning, a heater, internet, "premium house audio," two captains' chairs, better insulation … you get the idea. You can go the whole nine yards with the TruckHouse BCT to make it as comfortable and convenient as your actual home, and all come with room for a queen-sized bed. The only catch is all this go-anywhere do-anything excess costs a lot of money.

Prices for the BCT start at $285,000 and that's before you add in the heated floors. At least that factors in the price of the truck, sort of. You have to buy the Tacoma yourself and give it to TruckHouse, and the company says the number it factors in is just an estimate, so prices may vary. Almost $300,000 for an overloading rig sounds borderline unreasonable, and if you have that kind of cash to throw at a Tacoma, then you can almost certainly afford a stay at a five-star hotel instead of lugging one around with you.

But sometimes the heart wants what the heart wants, right? Right. And if your heart beats for one of these, you can check out TruckHouse's website for more info on how to place an order.