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This Weird Army Unimog Is the Perfect Apocalypse Machine

Used as a German military plane tug, this stubby, quad-cab Unimog is incredible.

You probably know all about the Unimog by now, and that Mercedes-Benz's weird mashup of tractor and truck can do it all. With a little customization, the Unimog can do almost any task. Plow a field? Sure. Carry a bucket for fixing electrical lines? Yup. Carry troops into battle? Definitely. Seriously overbuilt to tackle any terrain since its inception in the late 1940s, the Unimog is a multigenerational legend. And you're looking at one of the more unusual variants right now.

This 406-series Unimog from 1974 has the relatively rare double-cab body (colloquially referred to as a "Doka" from the German doppelkabine), and while these were sometimes fitted with an adorably little cargo bed, his one was delivered to the German military adapted to pull heavy objects for short distances. The for-sale ad where we spotted this beast claims it was used sparingly as an aircraft tug, and that makes sense given what look to be ballast weights on the rear and the hefty front bumper with a tow hitch. You can picture this behemoth nosing forward to pick up an aircraft tow bar, and then chugging backward out to the taxiway.

Perhaps it moved Luftwaffe F-4Fs or Panavia Tornados out of their hangers back in the day. If you're a military plane buff, that's an interesting side benefit. But the main attraction is the Unimog Doka's short overhangs and formidable off-road prowess, the latter bolstered by its portal axles for extra gear reduction and ground clearance, locking differentials, and formidable torque from its big 5.7-liter diesel engine. While it's set up for tug duty, it probably wouldn't be hard to source or fabricate the little cargo bed, and then you have a lot of capability in a relatively short overall package.

The Unimog is a legend, and this one—with its interesting body style and equally interesting history—could serve as the basis of a fantastic overlanding or adventure rig, or if you're of the same mind as us, something fun to run the kids to school in.