Car Lists

Range Finder: Every EV’s Range from Worst to Best

Spending more money usually—but not always—means getting more miles.

Whether you’re actively in the market for one or not just yet, electric cars are the new reality. Prices are constantly coming down, and they can be fun to drive if you’re open to the type of swift, silent, and torquey appeal they provide. Of course, it helps to have a dedicated charger at home and/or at the office, since public charging can require luck if you’re in an area where there aren’t many available—or patience if you’re in an area where chargers are plentiful. To see what the state of the market looks like, here we’ve compiled the EPA-rated ranges of the EVs available in America today, plus some models right around the corner. The base prices don’t take into account any available tax credits, which may still be available at the federal, state, and municipal level depending on the maker and where you live.

Note: EVs like the 1,900-hp Pininfarina Battista, Aspark Owl EV hypercar, Byton K-Byte concept, and Electric Jaguar E-Type Zero are not included here because they are either prototypes, conversions, being offered in limited numbers, or aren’t yet guaranteed to reach market.

Smart EQ Fortwo Electric Drive| Range: 57-58 Miles | Base Price: $24,650
The Smart is the runt of the EV litter and it definitely feels more like a golf cart than car, but the driving experience is more refined than you might think and it’s one of the easiest cars to park in urban areas. Still, it offers just 58 miles of range, or 57 miles if you opt for the more stylish cabriolet version—the only EV convertible in America—and its sliding fabric roof. The range-to-price ratio, though, is just one reason Daimler is considering killing the Smart brand, so you might want to grab one before they’re gone, or wait for a steep discount.

Fiat 500e | Range: 84 Miles | Base Price: $33,210
That’s not a typo. Yes, the saucy 500e has only 84 miles of range, but at least it does offer cute Italian looks. Built essentially to satisfy California’s EV mandate, it’s currently available in California and Oregon at attractive lease prices, but you may want to wait for the supercool  Fiat Concept Centoventi to catch a green light.

Hyundai Ioniq Electric | Range: 124 Miles | Base Price: $30,315
The Ioniq Electric is part of a lineup that also includes hybrid and plug-in-hybrid versions, and it offers 124 miles of all-electric range. It has an 88-kWh battery and a motor that delivers 118 horsepower and 218 lb-ft of torque. But you can do much worse (see above.)

Volkswagen e-Golf | Range: 126 Miles | Base Price: $32,890
A limited limits the fairly priced, fine-driving, and leasable e-Golf primarily to local runabout duty. The e-Golf delivers 134 horsepower and 214 lb-ft of torque, but it’s feeling a little dated and soon will give way to VW’s ID EV lineup of vehicles with increased range.

Nissan Leaf | Range: 150 Miles | Base Price: $30,875
The second-gen Leaf packs a 147-hp electric motor, up 40 from the previous version, with torque also increasing from 187 lb-ft to 236 lb-ft. While the first-gen Leaf had 107 miles of range, this one can run 150 miles between charges. Need more? Check out the Leaf Plus down below.

BMW i3/i3S | Range: 153 Miles | Base Price: $44,450
Sure, it can’t compete with a Tesla Model 3 or a Chevy Bolt in terms of range, but the funky-looking BMW EV has come a long way from its original range of only 81 miles. It now offers up to 153 miles of range on a full charge, per the EPA. The i3 delivers 170 horsepower, while the i3Ss bumps that number to 181. For even more range—albeit the kind that comes with burning fossil fuels—both i3 models are available with an onboard energy-generating two-cylinder engine.

Mercedes-Benz EQC | Range: 220 Miles (est) | Base Price: $70,000 (est)
The Mercedes-Benz EQC 400 is the first all-electric model from the EQ sub-brand and goes on sale in early 2020. The luxury EV’s dual motors provide 402 horsepower and 564 lb-ft of torque. Mercedes estimates a zero-to-60-mph time of 4.9 seconds and a top speed of roughly 112 mph.

Tesla Model 3 | Range: 220–240 Miles | Base Price: $36,200
The Model 3 was our 2018 Automobile Design of the Year, and you can finally order the $35,000 version—although it’s $36,200 including delivery and must be special ordered, as it’s no longer shown on Tesla’s website. That one includes an estimated 220 miles of range and hits the 60 mph mark in 5.6 seconds, while the Standard Plus offers 240 miles and a zero-to-60-mph time of 5.3 seconds.

Nissan Leaf Plus | Range: 226 Miles | Base Price: $39,990 (est.)
The Leaf Plus packs a 62-kWh battery and 226 miles of range versus the regular Leaf and its 40-kWh battery and 150-mile range. The Plus version is available this spring and is expected to start under $40,000.

Tesla Model Y | Range: 230—300 Miles | Base Price: $61,200
The standard Model Y SUV with 230 miles of range, but it won’t be available until 2021. In the meantime, the higher-trim and longer-range variants that can be ordered now can travel 280 to 300 miles on a charge and will arrive in 2020.

Rivian R1T Pickup | Range: 230–400 Miles | Base Price: $71,000 (est)
Rivian’s R1T wowed us when it made its debut at the 2018 L.A. Auto Show, and we can’t wait to drive the five-passenger pickup with a claimed range of up to 400 miles from a 180-kWh battery pack. (105-kWh, 230-mile and 135-kWh, 300-mile versions will be available, as well.) It features quad electric motors that offer up to 754 horsepower, can tow up to 11,000 pounds, and is currently scheduled to roll out in 2020. Semi-autonomous tech and an air suspension will be fitted to each one.

Jaguar I-Pace | Range: 234 Miles | Base Price: $81,495
This gorgeous crossover-thing and recent 2019 Automobile All-Star contender seats five adults and touts a range of 240 miles. Its electric fury totals 394 horsepower and 512 lb-ft of torque.

Chevrolet Bolt | Range: 238 Miles | Base Price: $37,495
The Chevrolet Bolt is a 2017 Automobile All-Star that delivers 238 miles of range. Its motor lays down 200 horsepower and 266 lb-ft of torque and can scoot the little hatch to 60 mph in 6.5 seconds.

Kia Niro EV | Range: 238 Miles | Base Price: $34,000 (est)
The spunky Niro has a 64-kWh battery pack and offers 201 horsepower, 291 lb-ft of torque from its electric motor. It’s a solid and somewhat funky choice even in a funky segment.

Rivian R1S SUV | Range: 400 Miles | Base Price: $72,500
The 2020 R1S is a 754-hp super SUV that will have the same battery options as the R1T but offer about 10 more miles per charge than that pickup. Maximum range will check in at an estimated 410 miles, while it has zero-to-60 time as low as three seconds. Granted, your range per charge will be much lower if you plan on exercising that ability, but the R1S will offer plenty of luxury and the interior room and packaging only an electric vehicle can provide.

Kia Soul EV | Range: 243 Miles | Base Price: $35,000 (est.)
The boxy Soul shares its powertrain and 64-kW battery pack with the Niro but ekes out five additional miles of range. Pricing is expected to start around $35,000.

Audi e-tron GT | Range: 248.5 Miles | Base Price: $80,000 (est.)
Production should kick off in 2020 for the four-door GT. It packs an electric motor at each axle, and they team to deliver a combined 590 horsepower. Audi promises a zero-to-60-mph time of less than 3.5 seconds and a range of 248 miles. It’s part of an EV onslaught coming from Audi that starts with the next vehicle on our list.

Audi e-tron | Range: 249 Miles | Base Price: $74,800
Audi is serious about its EV game and the e-tron (the brand name for all things electric from Ingolstadt) SUV has a 95-kWh battery pack and offers a decent range of 249 miles. It brings a zero-to-60 time of 5.5 seconds to its battle with the Mercedes EQC.

Volkswagen I.D./I.D. Crozz/I.D. Buzz/I.D. Vizzion | Range: 250-400 Miles | Base Price: $35,000-$75,000 (est)
The ID vehicles all share VW’s MEB modular electric-vehicle platform. The ID Crozz is expected to arrive at dealerships in 2020, followed by the 369-hp ID Buzz and the ID Vizzion four-door sedan that will offer a claimed range exceeding 400 miles on a single charge. There’s also a cool-looking but decidedly niche ID Buggy dune runner, but that one is expected to offer a more limited 155 miles of fun in the sun.

Hyundai Kona Electric | Range: 258 Miles | Base Price: $37,495
The normal EV has arrived and its name is Kona. It looks sharply modern and offers 258 miles of range. The Kona packs a 150-kWh battery and its motors deliver 201 horsepower and 291 lb-ft of torque. The compact SUV offers more range than a standard Tesla Model 3.

Polestar 2 | Range: 275 Miles | Base Price: $63,000 (est)
It looks like a stubbier version of the pricier and more powerful Polestar 1 plug-in hybrid, except this is an all-electric sedan that packs a 78-kWh battery pack with 275 miles of range. The 2020 sedan’s motors provide 408 horsepower and 243 lb-ft of torque.

Porsche Taycan | Range: 300 Miles | Base Price: $85,000 (est)
More than 600 horsepower, able to hit 60 mph in less than 3.5 seconds, and a range of 300 miles on a single charge? And it’s a Porsche? Hell, yeah. The Taycan, formerly the Mission E Concept, is coming in late 2019 and will slot between the Cayenne and Panamera. The price includes three years of free public charging—sweet.

Tesla Model X | Range: 289–325 Miles | Base Price: $92,500
The seven-seat SUV with funky falcon wing doors has 289 or 325 miles of range depending on trim and can tow up to 5,000 pounds. Its dual-motor all-wheel drive enables a sprint to 60 mph in 4.7 seconds in Long-Range form or a silly-quick 2.8 seconds in the Performance. The price above can of course be ballooned with further goodies, but if you order five seats instead of seven, the price starts at $89,500.

Tesla Model S | Range: 315–370 Miles | Base Price: $85,000
The car that’s become synonymous with “luxury EV,” the top-of-the-line Model S sedan now touts a 370-mile range thanks to a new electric motor, a zero-to-60-mph time of 2.4 seconds, and a top speed of 155 mph.