2012 Toyota Prius

II FWD 4-Dr Hatchback I4

2012 toyota prius Reviews and News

2012 Toyota Prius C Front Right Side View 2
Could anyone have forecast the success of the ugly little hybrid Toyota introduced back in 1997, when oil cost about $20 a barrel? "Yes," says a grinning Satoshi Ogiso. The Toyota chief engineer has been involved in Prius development since the beginning and has been gratified to see more than three million of his babies roll out of dealerships worldwide.
However, those impressive sales aside, the Prius's luster has started to dull. Just about every automaker of consequence now offers a gas-electric competitor, and, thanks mostly to Toyota's slow adoption of lithium-ion batteries -- the Prius Plug-in hybrid finally goes on sale this year -- some perform better than the Prius. It's been worth wondering of late if Ogiso and his team have milked all they can out of their hybrid head start.
Not so fast. If it's now relatively easy to build a hybrid, it's still very difficult to build a cheap one, which is exactly what Toyota has just accomplished. "My goal was to create an attainable hybrid...and not compromise the technology," says Ogiso. That, in a nutshell, is the 2012 Prius C, the newest and smallest member of the Toyota hybrid family.

Moving down a weight class

In pictures the new C looks a lot like its larger relatives, featuring the same Kammback profile as the Prius and Prius V hatchbacks. It also employs now familiar Hybrid Synergy Drive technology, which, consists of a small four-cylinder gas engine running on the Atkinson cycle, an electric motor, a nickel-metal-hydride battery pack, and a continuously variable transaxle.
In person, however, it's apparent that the Prius C is a much smaller and therefore different vehicle. Indeed, it derives its underpinnings not from the Prius but from the recently revised Yaris subcompact. This required all the hybrid components to similarly slim down. A 1.5-liter rather than a 1.8-liter four-cylinder lives under the hood with a similarly smaller, lighter power inverter. The battery pack consists of 120 cells rather than 168, saving some 25 pounds and allowing it to fit under the rear bench seat without intruding into the cargo hold. The most complex component, the CVT transaxle that also contains the electric motor, is cooled by its own transmission fluid rather than by water, which means it can do without a bulky radiator.
The sum of all these smaller parts is that the Prius C weighs 2496 pounds -- about 500 pounds less than the regular Prius. In fact, it's slightly lighter than a Ford Fiesta with a stick shift.
Despite its smaller package, the C packs the same fuel-efficiency punch as its big brother -- a 50 mpg combined EPA rating. Ogiso credits fast improving software for being able to eke more performance out of a smaller battery pack. The C actually scores a bit better than the regular Prius in the city, at 53 mpg, though it does worse on the highway at 46 mpg. Those numbers easily surpass those of the C's closest competitor, the 42-mpg Honda Insight. And although the new Prius gives up more than a foot in length to the Honda hybrid, it offers more passenger and cargo volume.

Pinching pennies for planet Earth

For all the advanced engineering that went into downsizing the Prius, Toyota resorted to somewhat less elegant methods to reduce the price from the larger car's $24,760 sticker to the C's $19,710. Though the Prius C can be had with all the amenities we've recently come to expect of subcompacts, including a touchscreen navigation system, pushbutton start, and aluminum wheels, you won't find them on the Prius C One, as the base model is called. It also does without a telescoping steering wheel, adjustable front headrests, and a split folding rear seat. You can have your dashboard in any color, so long as it's black (higher grade models get a splash of white on the dash, along with tasteful blue trim).
At least steering wheel audio controls, power windows and locks, and a USB connector survive the cost cutting. So does automatic climate control, which Ogiso says is too important to the hybrid's performance to eliminate. The larger Prius' annoying H-pattern shifter and electronic parking brake are apparently not quite as important, as both are thankfully missing from all Prius C models.
In any guise, the Prius c's interior has too many hard plastics to match segment leaders like the Ford Fiesta and Kia Rio, but its cheerful, modern design and a few hybrid-specific touches save it from being dour. As in all Prius models, the gauges live in the center of the dash and includes a 3.5-inch color display that encourages efficient driving with a variety of eco scores. There's even a mode that will allow you to keep track of how much money you're saving. You enter the gas price and a comparative fuel economy rating -- say, the Fiesta's 33 mpg combined rating -- and the car will add up all that gas money for you.

"A little more feisty"

The years of refinement baked into Toyota's hybrid technology is readily apparent from behind the wheel. The unpleasant characteristics that once typified these complex machines, like uneven throttle delivery and course engine startup have receded or disappeared entirely. The regenerative brakes are particularly impressive, having shed most of the sponginess that hampered earlier systems, leaving only a hint of grabbiness during stop-and-go traffic.
The subtlety of the hybrid bits leaves a car that for better or for worse, drives pretty much like the Yaris on which it's based. The "better" is its surprisingly lively handling and well-tuned electric power steering -- this being a more youth-oriented vehicle, Ogiso wanted it to be a "little more feisty" than the regular Prius. The "worse" is a brittle ride and twitchiness at speeds higher than 80 mph (the "C" stands for "city," with good reason). And despite its lightness and its sporting pretensions, the Prius C can feel even more lugubrious than its 99-hp net rating might indicate. Some of the blame goes to the CVT transmission, through which the 1.5-liter groans plaintively at full throttle. Then there's the gas pedal's unusually short range of travel, which makes it difficult to modulate acceleration and enhances the sense that it's really software, and not your right foot that's meting out air and fuel to the engine.
It's hard to argue with that software's decision making, though. Even as we hammer up Southern California foothills and chase after our photographer with no regard for saving gas, our observed fuel economy hovers around 45 mpg. And on a ride through San Diego with my lead foot safely confined to the passenger's footwell and a more responsible journalist at the wheel, we see 56 mpg. As in other hybrids there's an even more efficient eco mode, but activating it dulls the already sluggish throttle response. There's also an EV mode, in which the C can theoretically travel up to 25 mph with no help from the gas engine. We say theoretically because it requires so gentle a touch on the gas pedal that it's unrealistic anywhere beyond a parking lot.

Conclusion: Great hybrid; intriguing subcompact

For green car enthusiasts on a tight budget (and, yes, they are enthusiasts), this is a no brainer. The Prius C is a good hybrid -- a damn good hybrid, actually. And even in fully equipped, Prius C Four trim, it costs $23,990 -- about the same as a stripped out, fleet-only version of the full-size Prius.
For the average subcompact or compact car buyer, the picture is a bit hazier. As with the regular Prius, the C competes against more luxurious, more comfortable, and better driving gasoline-engine cars. A $19,710 hatchback with steel wheels is hard to swallow in this age of "premium" small cars. The fuel savings, though certainly meaningful in this price sensitive segment, are still not quite enough to offset the additional initial investment. According to our paper napkin calculations, it would take about six years of driving 20,000 miles per year to make up the difference between a Prius C and a base Fiesta (assuming $4-a-gallon gas). Even so, the Prius C is an interesting -- and we think very worthwhile -- experiment in the subcompact segment. Just as premium small cars like the Fiesta and the Mini Cooper have brought the performance, luxury, and style of bigger cars to entry-level buyers, the Prius C makes the hard-to-measure but very real appeal of virtuousness more affordable.

2012 Prius C

On sale: Spring 2012
Base price: $19,710
Engine: 1.5L I-4, 73 hp, 82 lb-ft
Motor: 60 hp
Total output: 99 hp
Transmission: Continuously variable automatic
Drive: Front-wheel
Fuel economy: 53/46/50 city/highway/combined (est.)
2012 Toyota Prius V Driver Front Three Quarter Blue
You know what the Toyota Prius is and all that it stands for. The third generation of the iconic hybrid vehicle debuted two years ago. Now we’ve driven the Prius v, which Toyota unveiled at last January’s 2011 Detroit auto show. It’s the first time that Toyota has affixed the Prius badge to a vehicle that’s bigger than the current-generation hatchback and its predecessor, the car that made the Prius name a household word.
2012 Toyota Prius V Driver Front Three Quarter Blue
As you might or might not have guessed, the use of the twenty-second letter of the alphabet as part of the new, bigger Prius’s badge is to emphasize its increased versatility, as compared with the standard hatchback model. Toyota lowercases and italicizes the v in an attempt to get people to pronounce the car’s name as “Prius vee” rather than “Prius five.” Um, good luck with that, Toyota; we suspect that you’ll have a 50:50 success rate. Many people are going to read the v as a Roman numeral.
Adding to the nomenclatural confusion, Toyota has designated three equipment levels for the Prius, and they’re known numerically, like the regular Prius models are. So we have the Toyota Prius v Two (base model); the Toyota Prius v Three (the midline model); and the Toyota Prius v Five (the top-of-the-line model). Perhaps Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., should have followed Toyota Europe’s lead and named our car the Prius+.
HOW MUCH BIGGER IS IT? The 2012 Toyota Prius v isn’t the size of a Ford Explorer, but it’s appreciably bigger than the regular Prius. “My biggest goal in developing the Prius v was utility and space,” says chief engineer Hiroshi Kayukawa, who made the obligatory journey to America to haunt Home Depot parking lots and visit famous tourist sites before returning to his 1500-member development team in Toyoda City to start work on the Prius v. One imagines that his conclusions were simple: “Yep, Americans are big and they buy too much big stuff at big-box stores. So let’s make the Prius v as big of a box as we can.”
2012 Toyota Prius V Driver Front Three Quarter Red
The Prius v is built on the same Toyota MC platform as the regular Prius, with a Macpherson-strut front suspension and torsion-beam rear. Base wheels and tires are sixteen inches, up from fifteen inches in the regular Prius, and seventeens are optional. The wheelbase is 3.1 inches longer, at 109.4 inches; overall length is 6.1 inches longer, at 181.7 inches (15.1 feet); the vehicle is 3.3 inches higher, at 62.0 inches; and it’s 1.1 inches wider, at 69.9 inches. Interior volume rises by 3.5 cubic feet, to 97.2 cu ft. There’s marginally more head, shoulder, and hip room both front and rear, but front legroom, strangely enough, is down 1.2 inches.
As for cargo space, one of the attributes that caused some potential buyers of the existing third-generation Prius to go elsewhere? It rises from 21.6 cubic feet behind the rear seats to 34.3 cubic feet, or 40.2 cubic feet when the seats are fully forward. With a driver and a front-seat passenger in place and the rear seats folded, the air space behind them rises dramatically, from 39.6 cubic feet for the third-generation Prius to 67.3 cubic feet in the v. To put these figures into perspective, a Toyota Camry sedan has 15 cubic feet of cargo capacity, so the Prius v has almost a Camry’s worth of additional space behind the rear seats when they’re occupied, and when those seats are folded, it has the equivalent of nearly two Camry trunks in additional cubic footage available under its sloping rear roofline.
The Prius v’s H-point (the distance from an average person’s hip joint to the ground) is 30 mm (1.2 inches) higher for front-seat occupants and 80 mm (3.1 inches) higher in the rear. This gives the Prius v some measure of the higher seating position that many people like in crossovers and SUVs.
The Prius v has a 3274-lb curb weight, which is 232 lb more than the regular Prius’s 3042-lb weight; not a bad weight penalty considering the increase in vehicle size. Toyota says that the 0-to-60-mph time is 10.4 seconds, versus 9.8 seconds for the standard Prius.
DOES IT HAVE THE SAME POWERTRAIN AS THE REGULAR PRIUS? Yes, indeed, it does. The 2012 Toyota Prius v shares its Hybrid Synergy Drive powertrain with the regular, third-generation Prius hatchback. It consists of a 1.8-liter, Atkinson-cycle, four-cylinder gasoline engine making 98 hp and 105 lb-ft of torque; a power-control unit; a nickel-metal-hydride battery pack; and an electric hybrid transaxle. Total output is 134 hp. One thing that’s new is a cooling jacket for the transaxle to cool the two permanent-magnet electric-motor/generators. Gear selection for the CVT (continuously variable transmission) is via a dash-mounted lever that you pull to the bottom of the gate into D for drive or back up for R for reverse; to select P for Park, you press a separate button located above this gear lever.
2012 Toyota Prius V Passenger Front Three Quarter In Motion
HOW DOES ITS FUEL ECONOMY COMPARE WITH THAT OF THE REGULAR PRIUS? “I knew I had to focus on two areas for the Prius v to achieve good fuel economy,” recalls Kayukawa: “Aerodynamics and weight reduction. We concentrated on air flow over the back of the roof and the rear flanks, and we achieved a coefficient of drag of 0.29.” So-called “aero corners” on the front and rear bumpers and a carefully designed rear spoiler helped with this. Molded into the headlights are little eyebrows that separate the air and move it around the side mirrors.
EPA numbers are not yet finalized, but Toyota estimates 44-mpg city, 40-mpg highway, 42-mpg combined ratings. This compares with 51/48/50 mpg in the conventional Prius. In our own drives near Half Moon Bay, California, south of San Francisco, we achieved 37 mpg on a 48-mile loop that included hilly, mountainous Skyline Blvd.; and 40 mpg on a 44-mile loop that included ten miles of freeway, a long stretch of California Highway 1, and more of Skyline Blvd. These routes were hardly indicative of the average American’s urban/suburban commute, and we were not driving gingerly, so the Prius did pretty well.
IT DRIVES A LOT LIKE A REGULAR PRIUS You push a button on the dash to turn on the vehicle, which starts in electric mode. A new warning tone for pedestrians, not audible from inside the car, sounds a bit like a sucking noise through a tube. This is to compensate for the fact that, at low speeds, there’s no conventional engine noise to alert pedestrians to the presence of the Prius.
2012 Toyota Prius V Passenger Rear Three Quarter Red
The huge, broad windshield makes for excellent forward visibility. You can manually elevate the driver’s seat quite a bit, so you feel like you’re riding high, or you can pump the seat down toward the floor and you feel like you’re appreciably closer to the ground.
There’s lots of CVT drone and mooing as the Prius v struggles to accelerate up the mountain toward Skyline Blvd. This is not exciting. Once we’re bounding along this mountaintop road through the trees, though, the Prius provides reasonable and predictable body control. There’s decent heft in the steering, but it feels artificially weighted and isn’t linear off-center. Still, it’s easy to place the car in a corner, and after driving the Prius on a number of challenging roads at a pace that few drivers ever will, we’d say it ain’t bad at all. Sure, there’s the usual oddness to the brake pedal response, but that improves a bit if you move the gear lever into the B setting to engage more engine braking.
Southbound on the 280, we noticed some wind rush over the A-pillars and a bit of road noise, but the Prius v has a very comfortable freeway ride. A new Pitch and Bounce Control system varies the amount of torque the hybrid motor sends to the front axle to suppress pitch and dive. It’s subtle, but it does appreciably help keep this bigger, longer Prius on an even keel.
INSIDE THE BIGGEST PRIUS YET As standard, the seats are upholstered in fabric. A new, leather-like fabric called SofTex is optional. To call it vinyl is unfair, because it’s soft and nice; Toyota says it weighs 28 percent less than leather and emits fewer VOC’s during production. The lid of the center console bin, which acts as an armrest, is upholstered in a swath of suede-like material. A wide instrument binnacle stretches across the center of the dash and contains the speedometer, fuel gauge, and other readouts. At the bottom of the center stack, a newly designed climate-control dial toggles left to right to move between mode, temperature, and fan speed; it’s a nicely designed mechanism.
2012 Toyota Prius V Front In Motion
The real news is in the rear seat. Huge rear doors and a two-level interior curb make ingress and egress easy. Parents should find it easy to step into the vehicle to install child seats and to secure rug rats into them. Sitting behind a five-foot, eleven-inch driver, I found plenty of rear-seat foot room, as your feet can extend under the front seats. There’s generous leg and knee room and good side visibility, plus a comfortable pull-down center armrest. The center seating position is awkward and rigid but it will be fine for short trips. The 60/40-split rear bench slides back and forth more than seven inches, so you can choose between more legroom and more cargo room. The seatbacks recline between 17 and 45 degrees.
PANORAMIC VIEWS, PANDORA, AND OTHER GOODIES An optional panoramic moon roof for the top-spec Prius v Five uses two fixed polycarbonate roof panels, which are 50 percent lighter than a similarly sized glass roof would be. Although the windows don’t open, they let in lots of light; a power roller shade can cover them completely.
A back-up camera is standard on all three Prius v grades, and radar cruise control is available as part of the Advanced Technology Package on the Five. An available JBL GreenEdge stereo weighs 4.2 lb less than a similar unit on the regular Prius and puts fewer demands on the alternator. Toyota makes much about its new Entune system, whereby you use an app on your smart phone to access Bing maps, Iheartradio, sports, weather, Pandora, and other services, all streamed through your mobile device but accessed through the touch screen. We had no luck getting Pandora to work in our first test car but in another vehicle it worked fine and we were hitting the thumbs-up and thumbs-down images on the touch screen to fine-tune our music preferences.
FUTURE PRIUS PLANS Toyota has already confirmed that it will introduce a plug-in-hybrid Prius, similar to the Chevy Volt, in the first half of 2012. The company will also bring us its smallest Prius yet, based on the Prius C concept, sometime next year. “I see Prius eventually leading Toyota sales here in the United States,” says Bob Carter, group vice president and general manager of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. “The Prius family defines Toyota today.” Carter says that, including the aforementioned new Prius models, Toyota will introduce some ten new hybrid models across its Toyota and Lexus brands over the next twenty months, and six will be entirely new.
2012 Toyota Prius v
Base price range, estimated: $26,000-$31,000
2012 Toyota Prius V Cockpit Tan
Powertrain
Engine: 1.8-liter DOHC 16-valve I-4
Horsepower: 98 hp @ 5200 rpm
Torque: 105 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm
Transmission: Continuously variable automatic
Drive: Front-wheel
Hybrid Battery Pack
28 nickel-metal-hydride 7.2-volt modules, cooling blower and control
Hybrid Transaxle
Two liquid-cooled, permanent-magnet motors (MG1 & MG2)
650-volt operating voltage
Measurements
Wheelbase: 109.4 in
L x W x H: 181.7 x 69.9 x 62.0 in
Legroom F/R: 41.3/35.9 in
Headroom F/R: 39.6/38.6 in
Cargo capacity (seats up/down): 34.3/67.3 cu ft
Curb Weight: 3274 lb
EPA fuel economy, estimated (city/highway/combined): 44/40/42 mpg
2012 Toyota Prius
2012 Toyota Prius
The versatile Prius hatchback has proved that hybrids can appeal to a broad spectrum of buyers. Toyota wisely widens its scope even further with the Prius v variant. It's not much roomier--legroom has actually shrunk by 1.2 inches in front--but the v's tall rear hatch certifies it for Costco duty. It exhibits the same competent Prius driving dynamics, with good body control and decently weighted steering. A steep hill, though, will tax the 134-hp powertrain, which carries over unchanged from the hatchback. The v takes 10.4 seconds to accelerate to 60 mph, a good half-second longer than the regular Prius. Fuel economy also suffers in comparison, coming in at 42 mpg. We wouldn't think so much of that decrease if it weren't for the fact that the European version of this model, called the Prius+, gets mileage-improving lithium-ion batteries. Prius owners feeling outgreened by the Chevrolet Volt need not despair, however, because Toyota is rolling out a plug-in version of the Prius that does use lithium-ion batteries. Its promised fifteen miles of electric range isn't quite in the Volt's league, but it should return better mileage than the Chevy in hybrid mode. It'll be cheaper, too, starting at $32,760. We've yet to drive the Plug-in--Toyota is introducing the vehicle in only fourteen states this year--but expect it to drive almost identically to the hatchback with which it shares everything except batteries. That's a good thing, as the latest Prius, though hardly a sport sedan, has nicely weighted steering, a well-behaved powertrain, and a comfortable, confident ride.
2013 Toyota Prius Front Three Quarter
There's a snazzier hybrid car on the way, in the form of a special trim level for the 2013 Toyota Prius. The Japanese automaker will offer its popular hybrid in a new model called the Prius Persona Series Special Edition. Upgrades to the model consist of visual changes inside and out.
California Governor Brown 2
California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed a new bill that will allow and regulate autonomous cars on the state's roadways. The bill was first introduced by Democratic Senator Alex Padilla. Governor Brown rode in one of Google's self-driving Toyota Priuses before signing the bill yesterday.
Toyota Hybrids In Paris On The Downshift 30 Pic 8
Can hybrids penetrate the European market, where diesel-powered vehicles reign supreme? Motor Trend’s Jonny Lieberman drives three Toyota hybrids in Paris to find out on the latest episode of The Downshift.
Lexus RX450h Google Autonomous Front Three Quarter
Google's autonomous car project is patting itself on its collective back: the company announced that its self-driving cars have traveled more than 300,000 miles with minimal human intervention or piloting.
2012 Toyota Prius Plug In Front Three Quarter
Global sales of Toyota hybrid vehicles have just reached the 4 million mark, the automaker revealed today. The news comes just a year after it announced total hybrid sales reached the 3 million mark.

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Certified Pre-Owned 2012 Toyota Prius Pricing

Certified Pre Owned Price
$16,875

Used 2012 Toyota Prius Values / Pricing

Suggested Retail Price
$24,000

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2012 Toyota Prius Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
1.8L I4Engine
Fuel economy City:
51 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
48 MPG
Horsepower:
134 hp
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats (optional)
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer Rear (optional)
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation (optional)
Vehicle
36,000 miles / 36 months
Powertrain
60,000 miles / 60 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 60 months
Roadside
25,000 miles / 24 months
Maintenance
25,000 miles / 24 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:30
Component
AIR BAGS:FRONTAL:SENSOR/CONTROL MODULE
Summary
Southeast Toyota Distributors, LLC (SET) is recalling certain models interspersed through model years 2009 through 2013 as follows: model year 2009-2012 Tacoma, 4Runner, Camry, Camry Hybrid, Prius, and RAV4; model year 2009-2010 Avalon, FJ Cruiser, and Highlander Hybrid; model year 2010-2013 model year Corolla, Sienna and Tundra; model year 2009-2013 Highlander and Venza; model year 2012 Prius V; and model year 2010-2012 Sequoia. During modification by SET to include accessories such as leather seat covers, seat heaters or headrest DVD systems, these vehicles may not have had the passenger seat occupant sensing system calibration tested. Without passing the calibration test, the occupant sensing system may not operate as designed.
Consequences
If the front passenger seat occupant sensing system is out of calibration, the front passenger airbags may not deploy or they may deploy inappropriately for the passenger's size and position. This could increase the risk of personal injury during the event of a vehicle crash necessitating airbag deployment.
Remedy
Southeast Toyota will notify owners, and dealers will test the sensitivity of the occupant detection sensors, and recalibrate them as necessary. The recall began on March 21, 2013. Owners may contact Southeast Toyota at 1-800-301-6859.
Potential Units Affected
3,235
Notes
Southeast Toyota Distributors, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:30
Component
SEATS
Summary
Southeast Toyota Distributors, LLC (SET) is recalling certain models interspersed through model years 2009 through 2013 as follows: model year 2009-2012 Tacoma, 4Runner, Camry, Camry Hybrid, Prius, and RAV4; model year 2009-2010 Avalon, FJ Cruiser, and Highlander Hybrid; model year 2010-2013 model year Corolla, Sienna and Tundra; model year 2009-2013 Highlander and Venza; model year 2012 Prius V; and model year 2010-2012 Sequoia. During modification by SET to include accessories such as leather seat covers, seat heaters or headrest DVD systems, these vehicles may not have had the passenger seat occupant sensing system calibration tested. Without passing the calibration test, the occupant sensing system may not operate as designed.
Consequences
If the front passenger seat occupant sensing system is out of calibration, the front passenger airbags may not deploy or they may deploy inappropriately for the passenger's size and position. This could increase the risk of personal injury during the event of a vehicle crash necessitating airbag deployment.
Remedy
Southeast Toyota will notify owners, and dealers will test the sensitivity of the occupant detection sensors, and recalibrate them as necessary. The recall began on March 21, 2013. Owners may contact Southeast Toyota at 1-800-301-6859.
Potential Units Affected
3,235
Notes
Southeast Toyota Distributors, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:30
Component
EQUIPMENT:OTHER:LABELS
Summary
Southeast Toyota is recalling certain model year 2008 and 2010-2013 Toyota Tundra, 2010-2012 Rav4, 2012 Toyota Sequoia, 2010-2011 Toyota Corolla, 2010-2011 Toyota Camry and Camry Hybrid, 2010-2013 Toyota Highlander and Highlander Hybrid, 2010-2013 Toyota FJ Cruiser, 2011 Toyota Land Cruiser, 2010-2013 Toyota Venza, 2010-2011 Toyota 4Runner, 2010-2013 Toyota Tacoma, 2011-2012 Toyota Sienna, 2012 Toyota Prius, 2013 Scion FR-S, 2011 Scion XD, 2011 Scion XB, and 2012 Scion TC vehicles. These vehicles were sold with labels that were outside the allowable one percent of accuracy of actual weight added. Thus, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) Number 110, "Tire Selection and Rims."
Consequences
An inaccurate label could lead to owners overloading their vehicles and tires. An overloaded vehicle can result in a tire failure which may result in a vehicle crash, personal injury, or property damage.
Remedy
Southeast Toyota will notify owners and provide a corrected label with instructions concerning its installation. A small group of the affected vehicles will need additonal remedies which are still being developed. The recall began on May 28, 2013. Owners may contact Southeast Toyota at 1-800-301-6859.
Potential Units Affected
7,525
Notes
Southeast Toyota Distributors, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: SOFTWARE
Summary
Toyota is recalling certain model year 2010 through 2014 Prius vehicles. In the affected vehicles, the Intelligent Power Module (IPM) inside the inverter module (a component of the hybrid system) contains transistors that may become damaged from high operating temperatures. If this occurs, various warning lamps will be illuminated on the instrument panel and the vehicle will have reduced power allowing it to only drive a short distance.
Consequences
The vehicle may enter a fail-safe/limp-home mode that limits the drivability of the vehicle. The hybrid system could also shut down completely resulting in a vehicle stall, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Toyota will notify owners and dealers will update the software for both the motor/generator control electronic control unit (ECU) and the hybrid control ECU, free of charge. If an owner experiences a failure of the inverter before the vehicle receives updated software, the dealer will replace the inverter assembly with a new one at no charge. The recall began on March 21, 2014. Owners may contact Toyota at 1-800-331-4331.
Potential Units Affected
698,457
Notes
Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
HYBRID PROPULSION SYSTEM: INVERTER
Summary
Toyota is recalling certain model year 2010 through 2014 Prius vehicles. In the affected vehicles, the Intelligent Power Module (IPM) inside the inverter module (a component of the hybrid system) contains transistors that may become damaged from high operating temperatures. If this occurs, various warning lamps will be illuminated on the instrument panel and the vehicle will have reduced power allowing it to only drive a short distance.
Consequences
The vehicle may enter a fail-safe/limp-home mode that limits the drivability of the vehicle. The hybrid system could also shut down completely resulting in a vehicle stall, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Toyota will notify owners and dealers will update the software for both the motor/generator control electronic control unit (ECU) and the hybrid control ECU, free of charge. If an owner experiences a failure of the inverter before the vehicle receives updated software, the dealer will replace the inverter assembly with a new one at no charge. The recall began on March 21, 2014. Owners may contact Toyota at 1-800-331-4331.
Potential Units Affected
698,457
Notes
Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing


NHTSA Rating Front Driver
5
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
4
NHTSA Rating Front Side
5
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
5
NHTSA Rating Overall
5
NHTSA Rating Rollover
4
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
Good
IIHS Overall Side Crash
Good
IIHS Best Pick
1
IIHS Rear Crash
Good
IIHS Roof Strength
Good

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2012 Toyota Prius

Depreciation
31.6%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$8,381
31.6%
Insurance
$6,265
23.6%
Fuel Cost
$5,308
20%
Financing
$2,052
7.7%
Maintenance
$2,719
10.3%
Repair Costs
$1,426
5.4%
State Fees
$366
1.4%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $26,517 What's This?
Value Rating: Excellent