True Luxe, Four-up

January 3, 2013
Aston Martin Bentley Ferrari Roll Royce Land Rover Parked
The Aston Martin Rapide, Bentley Mulsanne, Ferrari FF, Land Rover Range Rover, and Roll-Royce Phantom are an incredibly diverse quintet, with priorities ranging from ultimate performance to overt opulence. However, one thing these high-end luxury vehicles all have in common is that they can accommodate four passengers. We drove them in England, on real roads and in real traffic, on wet and dry pavement, to find out whether the newest member of the group, the brawny 2013 Range Rover, can challenge and possibly eclipse its even more expensive rivals. In this group test, we are looking not only for speed, space, traction, roadholding, street cred, and the latest technological wizardries. What counts more than any individual strength is the blend of all-around ability and appeal. That includes appearance and ambience, whether your eyes light up when they spot a series of corners, how these cars perform when pushed, and the overall feel-good rating that, even in a four-seater, is defined not only by packaging and functionality but also by style and craftsmanship.

Range Rover Supercharged

A relatively affordable attempt at creating the best of all worlds.
Visually, the new Range Rover is an evolution rather than a revolution, although it does have more bling than its charmingly stiff, upright, and royal predecessor. The only debatable detail is the trademark gills that have been moved from the front fenders -- where they made some sense -- to the doors, where they don't. The tailgate is again split horizontally, and both parts are power operated. The lower one is now less deep, so a person no longer needs a telescoping torso to reach into the cavernous luggage bay. When you opt for the Autobiography trim level and the Executive Class package fitted to our test car, you get two bucket seats that can, with the push of a button, trade rear-seat recline for cargo space. Despite the combed-back windshield and the ten-percent more slippery shape, the Range Rover still faces the wind with the posture of a brick mansion.
Modern luxury surrounds the driver. Like the exterior, the interior is evolutionary, but this time the motto was "less is more." Less as in fewer knobs and buttons; a bigger and easier-to-read touchscreen flanked by eight intuitive keys; more straightforward climate controls; a restyled multifunctional steering wheel; and the same rotary gear selector we know from other upper-class Tata models. So far, so good. The dislikes are not huge, but in this illustrious company no flaw goes unnoticed: The digital instruments look cheap, the inner armrests need to be lifted whenever you fasten or unfasten the seatbelt, some surfaces are borderline in terms of quality and fit, and simple things such as selecting your favorite radio station require more steps than in the other cars. There is no way to avoid going through submenus on the touchscreen, no head-up display, and no automatic stop/start system. Terrain Response 2 lacks a simple comfort/sport selector that would allow you to tweak the character of the car or, better still, its individual dynamic properties.
The new model from Solihull managed to do what few of us can: it lost weight. Depending on the powertrain, between 750 and 850 pounds have been jettisoned, which is a lot but is only about a fourteen-percent reduction of the still-substantial grand total. At 5137 pounds, the supercharged variant is no Lotus Elise, but at least it now compares very favorably with the BMW X5, the Audi Q7, and the Mercedes-Benz M-class. The switch to the Premium Lightweight Architecture (PLA) codeveloped with Jaguar transforms the SUV's handling. Forget everything you disliked about Range Rovers: submarine-inspired understeer, Queen Mary-esque body roll, anteater brake dive, and steering that left school before the cornering lessons started. The 2013 Rover not only feels less top-heavy, it also shed pounds in the chassis department, where aluminum subframes and suspension elements create a playful light-footedness. The engineers are particularly proud of two new features, Terrain Response 2 and Dynamic Response. TR2 is standard and denotes an additional mode that autonomously selects the appropriate drive program from an unchanged choice of five settings; DR is Land Rover-speak for self-acting, switchable antiroll bars and comes on all supercharged models. Driver intervention is still required to dial in low range and hill-descent control.
Shod with optional 275/45WR-21 Goodyears, our Range Rover doesn't ride all that well around town, where the stiff sidewalls and the firm air springs make for bobbing headlights and tap dancing over drainage grids. Above 40 mph, however, all that goes away, and instead, a cushy comfort zone prevails. Unlike its ancestors, which were all over the place when pushed hard, the new Range Rover is in total command. The steering in particular is a real gem. It holds a straight line even on bumpy off-camber blacktop, provides exactly the right measure of turn-in support, is incredibly precise, and executes sudden changes of direction without undue weight and effort. True, the turning circle is vast, and some might prefer lighter steering effort at parking speeds. The brakes combine strong initial bite with plenty of stamina and an easy-to-modulate pedal. It's only on the last few yards before standstill that a heavier-than-expected effort is required to squash that ambitious kinetic energy.
The supercharged V-8 runs smoothly and quietly unless you really push it, but its thirst is enormous and those 510 horses take a little longer than they should to pool their energy and beam the vehicle toward the horizon. With the throttle fully depressed, the SC roars from 0 to 60 mph in 5.1 seconds, according to its maker. Forward thrust expires at a comparatively tame 140 mph. The maximum torque of 461 lb-ft provides an addictive measure of mid- to top-end grunt, making passing maneuvers exceptionally easy. This is sports car swiftness dressed in a traditional SUV silhouette.
Land Rover Range Rover Supercharged
BASE PRICE:
$99,950
POWERTRAIN
ENGINE:
32-valve DOHC supercharged V-8
DISPLACEMENT: 5.0 liters (305 cu in)
POWER: 510 hp @ 6000-6500 rpm
TORQUE: 461 lb-ft @ 2500-5500 rpm
TRANSMISSION: 8-speed automatic
DRIVE: 4-wheel
CHASSIS
STEERING:
Electrically assisted
FRONT SUSPENSION: Control arms, air springs
REAR SUSPENSION: Multilink, air springs
BRAKES: Vented discs, ABS
TIRES: Goodyear Eagle F1 SUV-4x4
TIRE SIZE: 275/45R-21 110W
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H:
196.8 x 87.4 x 72.3 in
WHEELBASE: 115.0 in
TRACK F/R: 66.5/66.3 in
WEIGHT: 5137 lb
CARGO CAPACITY: 32.1/71.7 cu ft(rear seats up/down)
EPA MILEAGE: 13/19 mpg (est.)
0-60 MPH: 5.1 sec
TOP SPEED: 140 mph

Aston Martin Rapide

A remarkably emotional achievement on a shoestring budget.
Every Aston Martin -- besides the silly Cygnet -- is built on the company's VH architecture, which combines dimensional flexibility with a choice of body styles. Thanks to VH, Aston can build small production runs (1000 Virages, 101 Zagatos, fewer than 150 V12 Vantage roadsters) at a profit. The Rapide, the brand's second-most-popular model, is loosely based on the DB9. The beautiful four-door "coupe" sports a long if narrow liftgate and a large, 11.2-cubic-foot trunk. Less generous is the second-row passenger compartment. There are two seats, but access through the narrow swan-wing doors is handicapped by tall sills and a sloping roofline, and the center console is unnecessarily wide. The space suffices only for children and flexible adults. Although the rear of the Aston is marginally easier to access than the Ferrari's, once you're inside, the FF is actually roomier and more comfortable.
Inside, the Rapide is old-school Aston Martin. Welcome to an orgy of leather and wood and chrome, handbuilt to order, beautiful to the eye and memorable to the touch. Never mind the center console, which looks like a complicated high-end stereo from the 1970s. It's best to leave it alone, choose a temperature setting, set the transmission to Sport and the dampers to Track, and keep an eye on the small digital speedometer. One dab at the Emotion Control Unit (a.k.a. the ignition key) will startle the neighbors. The sounds of the V-12 range from a hammering, tinnitus-inducing idle to a low-frequency midrange yell that can shake windowpanes loose to full-throttle thunder that strips trees of their fall foliage as you fly past. The extroverted V-12 may deliver a relatively modest 470 hp, but when the intake plenum fills its mighty lungs, the Aston sounds and feels like the fastest car in this group. In reality, it takes 5.0 seconds to bellow from 0 to 60 mph. The top speed is a remarkable 184 mph, and the fuel-mileage rating is tied for the best in this thirsty group, but that's really not saying much.
Although the six-speed automatic transmission works well in D, it would be a shame to ignore the ergonomic shift paddles, which are much more rewarding to use. In sport mode, a heavy right foot is all it takes to make the fat Bridgestones shriek with joy in first and second gear, but thanks to the 295/35YR-20 rubber and the transaxle layout, traction isn't really an issue. The car simply tucks in, hangs on, and comes clean. Although deactivating stability control encourages the Rapide to fishtail at the exit of just about every second-gear bend, drama is not the Aston's forte, nor is it its main trait. Instead, this is a wonderfully communicative GT, a car that will talk you through all the way to the limit and beyond, a gifted g-force artist and a totally transparent tool. The number-one sweet spot is the steering. Initially a touch on the light side, the electro-hydraulic rack-and-pinion device keeps you informed and in charge at all times. Everything about it is spot-on: ratio, sensitivity, speed, weight, action, holding force, self-centering motion, dampening. Full praise also goes to the brakes. They can be noisy, and they smell when worked hard, but the pedal is a pleasure to modulate, effort and deceleration are always in balance, and we have yet to find a road that exhausts the system's remarkable stopping power.
Range Rover vs. Rapide? Both represent modern British luxury, both are ultracool statements on wheels, both are equally at home on the highway and on narrow two-lanes. The Aston is a compromised four-seater, but at speed it is even more involving than the Range Rover -- plus it sounds better.
Aston Martin Rapide
BASE PRICE:
$212,110
POWERTRAIN
ENGINE:
48-valve DOHC V-12
DISPLACEMENT: 5.9 liters (362 cu in)
POWER: 470 hp @ 6000 rpm
TORQUE: 443 lb-ft @ 5000 rpm
TRANSMISSION: 6-speed automatic
DRIVE: Rear-wheel
CHASSIS
STEERING:
Electrohydraulically assisted
FRONT SUSPENSION: Control arms, coil springs
REAR SUSPENSION: Control arms, coil springs
BRAKES: Vented discs, ABS
TIRES: Bridgestone Potenza S001
TIRE SIZES F, R: 245/40R-20 (95Y), 295/35R-20 (105Y)
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H:
197.6 x 84.3 x 53.5 in
WHEELBASE: 117.7 in
TRACK F/R: 62.6/63.5 in
WEIGHT: 4387 lb
CARGO CAPACITY: 11.2/31.3 cu ft (rear seats up/down)
EPA MILEAGE: 13/19 mpg
0-60 MPH: 5.0 sec
TOP SPEED: 184 mph

Bentley Mulsanne

Olde-worlde English luxury fuses with distinctive Teutonic undertones.
Originally, Bentley had planned to derive its Mulsanne flagship from the aluminum-spaceframe architecture of the Audi A8, but when management ran out of time and money, the classic steel-intensive approach prevailed. As a result, the Mulsanne tips the scales at 5976 pounds. That's the bad news. The good news concerns the flagship's vaultlike solidity; it feels as if it were machined from one big chunk of iron. The doors swing open with a self-conscious inertia of their own, the chromed buttons and levers latch and lock like the innards of a church-tower clock, the massive woodwork and thick leather trim look as if they'll see it through to the next millennium. This indestructible heaviness also prevails under the skin, where we find a spiderlike subframe cradling the engine, a multilink rear axle suspended on air springs and adjustable dampers, and four ventilated brake discs seemingly modeled after cast-iron manhole covers.
Despite the long wheelbase and the trick suspension, the big Bentley doesn't ride very well around town. When it encounters deep potholes and sharp transverse irritations, the Mulsanne reacts in a formal and firm fashion. Its brakes respond promptly and with reassuring bite, but it takes some effort to reel in all that momentum from triple-digit speeds. Within city limits, the steering is much too heavy. On the open road, the broad-shouldered but narrow-eyed cruiser frowns at every high-velocity direction change and cites mild understeer when asked to describe its favorite demeanor. However, should his lordship at the wheel feel inclined to switch off stability control, the prince of whales will happily display its considerable power-oversteer talents. What neutralizes all that weight with overwhelming ease is the 505-hp twin-turbo V-8, which hurls the imposing carriage from 0 to 60 mph in only 5.1 seconds. Mated to an eight-speed ZF automatic transmission, the 6.8-liter powerplant features cylinder deactivation and variable valve timing. Although the engine is redlined at a defensive 4500 rpm, the altar-shaped wire-mesh grille keeps slicing insects to 184 mph.
The Mulsanne's exquisite driver environment has all the elements you expect to see in a Bentley, such as organ-stop air vents, a knurled-chrome gear selector, glossy mirror-finish timber, and a commanding view over one of the world's longest hoods. There is plenty of room in the front as well as in the rear, where you are enthroned on diamond-quilted, power-operated chairs, rest your feet on lamb's-wool rugs, and put your hands on tray tables that extend with a continuous, smooth motion. The cabin radiates a grand atmosphere reminiscent of the smoking room at an old-fashioned men's club, which confirms that the Bentley is the epitome of yesterday's idea of luxury. Everything about this car is stately: the way it looks, smells, feels, drives. The infotainment system is nonetheless up-to-date, and handling and roadholding rate four out of five stars. Just don't expect to be spoiled by the latest driver-assistance systems or an equivalent to BMW's driving-experience selector.
Range Rover vs. Mulsanne? The SUV is lighter, nimbler, and more maneuverable -- and it's more fun to drive, at least on the low side of 125 mph. The Bentley is a torque monster that celebrates the marque's history by ticking all the boxes that mattered in the past but probably not enough of those that matter today and tomorrow.
Bentley Mulsanne
BASE PRICE:
$302,425
POWERTRAIN
ENGINE:
16-valve OHV twin-turbocharged V-8
DISPLACEMENT: 6.8 liters (412 cu in)
POWER: 505 hp @ 4200 rpm
TORQUE: 752 lb-ft @ 1750 rpm
TRANSMISSION: 8-speed automatic
DRIVE: Rear-wheel
CHASSIS
STEERING:
Electrohydraulically assisted
FRONT SUSPENSION: Control arms, air springs
REAR SUSPENSION: Multilink, air springs
BRAKES: Vented discs, ABS
TIRES: Dunlop SP Sport Maxx
TIRE SIZE: 265/40R-21 (108Y)
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H:
219.5 x 86.9 x 59.9 in
WHEELBASE: 128.6 in
TRACK F/R: 63.6/65.0 in
WEIGHT: 5976 lb
CARGO CAPACITY: 15.6 cu ft
EPA MILEAGE: 11/18 mpg
0-60 MPH: 5.1 sec
TOP SPEED: 184 mph

Ferrari FF

An addictive driver's car and a compromised four-seater.
The FF is the answer to a question nobody asked, yet it would seem to hit a sweet spot in the market. At first glance, the Ferrari may be handicapped by the absence of rear doors, but those who sit in row two are almost always small and agile enough to sneak in and out. And even when traveling four up, the station wagon from Maranello can carry 15.9 cubic feet of luggage. What the FF lacks are sick bags for three of the four crew members. That's because the packaging and visibility in the rear border on claustrophobic, and the front-seat passenger faces an (optional) semianalog rev counter and a digital speedometer sandwiched between the airbag door and the glove box. For the faint-hearted, this may be too much information. For the aficionado, it is of course thrilling to watch firsthand how the normally aspirated 6.3-liter V-12 whips through seven gears, keeps brushing the 8200-rpm redline, and recites a musical spectrum that ranges from Mahler to Metallica.
Sadly, our FF was not a prime specimen. The dual-clutch automatic transmission occasionally behaved in an uncouth manner during the split second it devotes to preselecting the ratio, throttle tip in and tip out were less smooth than we remember, and the car kept lapsing into an ever-so-slight crabbing motion, which might have been caused by the steering or the four-wheel-drive system. One area where a Ferrari almost never goes wrong is performance, and the FF scored full marks. At a factory-measured 3.7 seconds from 0 to 62 mph, the 4145-pound coupe competes in a league of its own among this group, and the same applies to its maximum speed of 208 mph. Although these numbers read like a dream come true, the prancing horse needs suitable terrain to show its full potential. On a German autobahn, the jet-engine-like acceleration from 125 to 170 mph is an experience you will never delete from your mind's memory stick. But on British country roads, where 60-mph-and-lower speed limits prevail, the Italian stallion rarely passes from jog to trot. Underchallenged and overmotivated, you either shift into drive and give up or you keep roaring up the rev ladder in the bottom three gears like a hooligan approaching retirement.
With the manettino in Race mode, all it takes to extract some attitude from the 295/35YR-20 Pirellis is an open second-gear corner. When you set spurs to it, this is a lovely car -- progressive, responsive, impressive. But it takes warm tires, hot brakes, and the right habitat to get the best out of the Ferrari, which is then chuckable yet balanced, aggressive but honest, focused and very fast. Slow down, and the suspension seems frozen even with the dampers in their softest setting, the tires trade tenacious grip for dedicated tramlining, and the steering feels slightly wooden around the straight-ahead position. It's a black-or-white car, the FF. It shines when put to the test, but it loses interest when relegated to the mundane. True, the fascination of the 651-hp engine will outlast every traffic jam, the tastefully appointed cabin has a special charm of its own, and the highly involving driver interface -- paddles, manettino, steering, pedals -- keeps the adrenaline flowing. But in the final analysis, this is a Sunday morning plaything, a special sports car for special occasions.
Range Rover vs. FF? There is very little overlap here. The Range Rover shines off-road, where the Ferrari will never venture. The Ferrari longs for a day at the racetrack, where the Range Rover would go only if it were towing a trailer.
Ferrari FF
BASE PRICE:
$302,450
POWERTRAIN
ENGINE:
48-valve DOHC V-12
DISPLACEMENT: 6.3 liters (382 cu in)
POWER: 651 hp @ 8000 rpm
TORQUE: 504 lb-ft @ 6000 rpm
TRANSMISSIONS: 7-speed automatic (rear), 2-speed automatic (front)
DRIVE: 4-wheel
CHASSIS
STEERING:
Hydraulically assisted
FRONT SUSPENSION: Control arms, coil springs
REAR SUSPENSION: Multilink, coil springs
BRAKES: Vented carbon-ceramic discs, ABS
TIRES: Pirelli PZero
TIRE SIZES F, R: 245/35R-20 (95Y), 295/35R-20 (105Y)
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H:
193.2 x 76.9* x 54.3 in
WHEELBASE: 117.7 in
TRACK F/R: 66.0/65.4 in
WEIGHT: 4145 lb
CARGO CAPACITY: 15.9 cu ft
EPA MILEAGE: 11/16 mpg
0-62 MPH: 3.7 sec
TOP SPEED: 208 mph *not including mirrors

Rolls-Royce Phantom

Not flawless but a hoot to drive and an unrivaled statement.
If you're not stinking rich, you either need an inflated ego or very big sunglasses to feel at home in the Phantom. Out of these five cars, the Rolls-Royce is easily the least understated. This vehicle typically shuttles from one gated gravel driveway to the next, is often used exclusively as short-distance special-occasion transport, and has an unmistakable silhouette that tends to say more about the owner hiding behind the wide C-pillars than about the salaried driver up front. If those back-benchers only knew what they are missing by letting their chauffeur have all the fun. Admittedly, the first encounter with the bold behemoth can be a real culture shock. At 230 inches long, the XXL radiator grille with motorcar attached seems much too large for congested driving environments. The novice's biggest worry will likely be the grand turning circle, which measures 45.3 feet in this regular-wheelbase test car. Although the Rolls brandishes more cameras per square foot than Fort Knox, it takes a captain's license to steer the HMS Phantom safely through the rush-hour tide.
First released in 2003, the Phantom is showing its age, even though it was mildly restyled and updated for 2013. The lidded seat controls in the center console are a nuisance, the level of available technology doesn't match that of the latest BMW 7-series, the suicide doors are an increasingly inconvenient marketing ploy, and the rear seats are in need of an update. Although you can specify a variety of different shapes and upholsteries, the "lounge" configuration that we sampled neither looked nor felt sufficiently special. Rounded off at the sides, the three-seat sofa is reasonably comfy, but it drew criticism for the lack of lateral support, the comparatively modest amount of legroom, and the lack of adjustment range (throwing more money at the Phantom addresses these complaints). We applaud the contemporary approach to luxury interpreted so well by Rolls-Royce, but a brand that claims to set the pace at the top end of the premium league should provide even more space, more variety, and more flair to the check-writing elite.
The Phantom engine has twelve cylinders, but although its "6.75-litre" displacement is within one cubic centimeter of the Mulsanne's V-8, the Rolls musters a more moderate 453 hp and only 531 instead of 752 lb-ft of torque. When the flag drops, however, and the two big sedans vroom from 0 to 60 mph, Goodwood loses only 0.6 second to Crewe. Despite the touchy steering and thin-rimmed wheel, the initially grabby brakes, the relaxed eight-speed transmission, and the fixed chassis calibration, the Rolls quickly grows on the keen driver. The Phantom is surprisingly stable, keeps its sumo body in check at all times, and combines benign handling with exemplary comfort. Generous wheel travel and proactive air dampers create a proper magic carpet ride. The Phantom flies, wafts, and glides as if it were part hovercraft.
Range Rover vs. Phantom? One English icon meets another. The Rolls-Royce is much more visible, expressive, and extroverted. It is a relatively modern conveyor of a positively conservative message. But when it comes to the best back seats, the showdown is between the Bentley and the Range Rover.
Rolls-Royce Phantom sedan
BASE PRICE:
$403,570
POWERTRAIN
ENGINE:
48-valve DOHC V-12
DISPLACEMENT: 6.7 liters (412 cu in)
POWER: 453 hp @ 5350 rpm
TORQUE: 531 lb-ft @ 3500 rpm
TRANSMISSION: 8-speed automatic
DRIVE: Rear-wheel
CHASSIS
STEERING:
Hydraulically assisted
FRONT SUSPENSION: Control arms, coil springs
REAR SUSPENSION: Multilink, coil springs
BRAKES: Vented discs, ABS
TIRES: Goodyear Eagle NCT5
TIRE SIZES F, R: 255/50R-21 106W, 285/45R-21 109W
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H
: 230.0 x 78.3 x 64.5 in
WHEELBASE: 140.6 in
TRACK F/R: 66.4/65.8 in
WEIGHT: 5840 lb
CARGO CAPACITY: 16.2 cu ft
EPA MILEAGE: 11/19 mpg
0-60 MPH: 5.7 sec
TOP SPEED: 149 mph

5 Bentley Mulsanne

How can such a sumptuously equipped and amazingly well-built status symbol be so strangely soulless to drive? The Bentley goes really well, handles OK, and is not even excessively thirsty. But, somehow, it lost the charm of the otherwise-outclassed Arnage that it replaced. The ride is too firm, the steering too heavy, and the substantial curb weight can be felt in every move it makes -- even though the magical 6.8-liter V-8 has been improved almost beyond recognition. The Mulsanne is a luxury car at a crossroads: not sufficiently advanced to change the rules, too Germanic to woo the traditionalists, a fine automobile in need of a more focused mission.

4 Ferrari FF

The same money will nearly buy a Ferrari F12 Berlinetta, although that car lacks four-wheel drive and rear seats. The question is: do those two items make the FF more desirable? In this context, the answer is both yes and no. Yes, because you can actually carry two extra heads, and there are weather conditions and terrain where rear-wheel drive won't do. But let's face it, when rear seats do matter, a Ferrari is unlikely to rank high on the shopping list. Conversely, when it's a hard-core car you're after, four seats are rarely a requirement. The FF is a wonderful driving machine and a highly emotional choice, but it is a poor four-seater, and it isn't a compelling luxury car, either.

3 Rolls-Royce Phantom

The extended-wheelbase Ghost would have had a better chance of winning this test. It is more conveniently sized, more up-to-date, and more involving to drive than the Phantom. The big Rolls needs a more convincing rear-seat compartment, and it needs engineering updates that only the next-generation model can provide. Meanwhile, the priciest car in this group spoils us with the most charismatic personality, the best ride by a long shot, and a presence that is second to none. The Phantom is silent, splendid isolation at its best. In addition, the precise, responsive, and swift Roller is surprisingly rewarding to drive.

2 Aston Martin Rapide

Design. Sound. Performance. Driving pleasure. Like the FF, the Rapide is only a half-hearted four-seater. But at least it has four doors, which makes it a lot easier to put stuff on the back chair, transport the dog, or pack up the twins for their short ride to school. This is the most practical Aston by a long shot. It also is one of the prettiest four-door cars on the planet, and the noises it makes aim right at your heart. More to the point, the Rapide is fun to drive in a basic, almost old-fashioned manner. It has telepathic steering, a raw and raucous V-12, a chassis designed for optimum weight distribution, and sensational brakes. This 100-proof sport coupe is free of filters, artificial flavoring, softeners, and diluting agents.

1 Range Rover Supercharged

Even the most expensive, fully loaded Range Rover ($152,000) costs significantly less than any of these rivals, and it's the only one in this group that can venture off-road. It also offers the most complete assortment of state-of-the-art driver-assistance systems. The other cars may be faster, more stylish, sharper at the limit, and later on the brakes, but the Range Rover is not far behind. It is dynamically pretty much on par with the best, and it is easy to operate, quick, and slick. The final decider is the back seats. In Executive Class trim, you get a five-mode massage function, heating and ventilation, reclining backrests, four-zone A/C, eight-inch video monitors -- you name it. So the Range Rover wins. Still not quite enough rear legroom? Then wait for the long-wheelbase model coming soon.

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2013 Land Rover Range Rover

Base 4WD 4-Dr Sport Utility V8
starting at (MSRP)
$82,650
Engine
5.0L V8
Fuel Economy
14 City 20 Hwy
2013 Land Rover Range Rover