Comparison: 2011 Hyundai Elantra vs. 2012 Ford Focus

Regis Lefebure

That experience shines even more brightly when we finally escape the Beltway and find some winding rural Maryland roads. The Elantra is no slouch at cornering, taking fast turns with reasonably little body roll and little complaint from its Continental all-season tires. But it's never much fun, which is where the Focus really distinguishes itself. Through quick switchbacks, its back end feels noticeably more planted, and its overall limits feel slightly higher even though it wears slightly taller-profile Continental all-seasons. More important, we enjoy the Focus more because it supplies that now rare commodity known as steering feel. The steering wheel in the Focus is a communicative, lively, naturally weighted driving tool. The Elantra's tiller, in contrast, is much more typical of modern small cars - it gets the job done accurately enough but relates very little of what's happening to the front tires.

Conclusion: Serving special interests

Our candidates have a lot in common. They achieve good fuel economy, offer lots of electronic goodies, look quite good inside and out, and drive well in just about any environment. We hear they want lower taxes and support the troops, too. But as with most campaigns these days, the choice comes down to special interests. If you value interior packaging, user-friendly controls, and getting the absolute maximum fuel economy for your dollar, go ahead and support the Elantra - thousands of young families will likely agree with you. We, however, happen to be vocal backers of the enthusiast lobby, complete with membership cards that read "No Boring Cars." Ford has unabashedly pandered to those of us who care about driving by designing an efficient, comfortable mainstream car that absolutely nails the finer points of steering feel, suspension tuning, and overall driver involvement. Our vote goes to the Focus.

yellow98cobra
Comparison? C'mon . . .a hatchback and a sedan. A top-line "Limited" and a mid-line "SE". A six-speed auto and a five speed stick! I know, I know, similar cars weren't available. In their rush to be first once again we get a comparison that's apples to oranges. If we can't get a real comparison of equivalent cars, don't bother.
QMan
This review is upside down. I have driven both cars. The Ford has MUCH more headroom and is easier to enter and exit, and it has more options. It is also a slightly smoother and slightly quieter ride. But it is much more expensive with the options. In every other respect the Elanta wins every comparison I can think of. Elantra every time for me.
fordfan4ever
tonkatoytruck i want what your smokin.price and gas mileage are important depending on who you are but the most important thing to most people when buying a car is how much they enjoy driving the car.this focus still gets great mileage and its cheaper.and how can you say the elantra is more reliable when the ford has'nt even been out for 1 month.even though its a economy car does'nt meen it has to drive like one.this new focus will win car of the year hands down.oh bye the way ford hater ,have you drivin a ford lately?
tonkatoytruck
One last thing, although the Elantra has had some reliability issues in the past, the newer Elantras are far more reliable than the Focus, which has never been very reliable and is only now delivering mediocre reliability. The newer Elantras are far more reliable than the Focus according to true delta.
tonkatoytruck
TBone85,You missed the point. I do NOT want a bigger car. I want a car with great gas mileage. That is NOT the Focus. I also want a cheap price. Again, not the Focus.My point is that if someone wanted an economy vehicle like this, they could get a bigger car for the same price with the same mileage. So, from a design standpoint, Ford failed on two of the most important aspects of this vehicle segment.I do understand that there are several different needs for a vehicle like this. For some, this is all they can afford and is a daily driver. But, for a growing segment of the population, it a solution to rising fuel prices. For the latter, it is all about saving money. The latter usually has more than one car and probably has a long commute. I would suggest that the latter is the growing segment of the population entering the economy car market.1fastone,I drove the Elantra and had no such issues with cornering. In matter of fact, its cornering abilites are remarkable. Probably the rental tires
1fastone.
Wondering if the Focus is as easily blown around as the Hyundai? I just rented an Elantra with the following observations: 1) excellent interior, 2) any wind stronger than a fart blows it all over the road, 3) the tires on the rental ought to be illegal--on even a moderate corner at a fairly slow speed, the car completely rolled over the tires, 4) after 3 days I returned the rental due to electronic failures (car would occasionally alarm when manually unlocking, manual unlocking was required because the remote only worked 10% of the time, after exiting the car for more than a few minutes every interior component would reset--radio shuts off, odometer resets, radio goes to FM channel 87, ventillation resets to blowing on driver regardless of where it was left, etc.). So final tally--excellent interior and fuel economy. Poor quality, terrible tires regardless of whether this was a rental or not, Hyundai's version of "flame surfacing" is already old, poor rear 3/4 visibility. How does Ford do against that?
Tbone85
Different buyers have different criteria. Driving dynamics were at the center of my decision matrix 4 years ago so I bought a Mazda3. Apparently other buyers agreed as the previous generation 3 saw an increase in market share versus it's predecessor. At least Ford offers model choices that trade off some driving dynamics for higher mileage. One size does not fit all. Some people actually want to enjoy driving their car even if it's a compact.The Sonata while a nice piece is obviously in a larger car class and doesn't come close to driving experience of the Focus. Sounds like the same argument of folks who say for the price of a fully loaded Sonata, they'd rather have a larger entry level Taurus. To each his own.
tonkatoytruck
The two most important categories of ecomomy cars is gas mileage and price. Driving dynamics take a distant third, especially when discussing the "limits" of these vehicles. If dynamics were important, they would call them sports cars. Based on these criteria, the Hyundai clearly wins the segment category. If I wanted a vehicle with the Focus' mpg and price, I would get the Sonata.
gmhonda
I think they should put the Elantra's front clip onto the Focus...otherwise both are ugly at different ends.

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