2010 Porsche 911

Carrera RWD 2-Dr Coupe H6 man trans

2010 porsche 911 Reviews and News

0912 10 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+rear Three Quarter View
How much 911 do you need? Objectively, the difference between the 345-hp bottom-rung Carrera and the latest 500-hp Turbo is not nearly as dramatic as the numbers would suggest. With the seven-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission set for launch control, the Turbo beats the base model from 0 to 60 mph by 1.3 seconds, according to Porsche. When you compare the manual-transmission models, the acceleration advantage shrinks to an even less meaningful one second flat. As far as top speed is concerned, the wide-body Turbo's 194 mph eclipses its slimline sibling by a relatively unsensational 14 mph.
0912 10 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+rear Three Quarter View
Price-wise, however, the two rear-engine coupes are separated by a whopping $56,500 - about the price of a Boxster S. So how can we possibly suggest that the 2010 Turbo is the best-ever 911 and even more desirable than the discontinued 530-hp GT2 and the awesome 435-hp GT3? Why would we happily fork out such a massive premium for a top-of-the-line model that, in naked numbers, is not that much quicker than the no-frills Carrera? Because the new Turbo is an even faster-responding, more complete, and better balanced driving machine than its predecessor. Because the new Turbo's handling and ride comfort lift it to a plateau above the uncompromising GT3 and the devilishly difficult GT2. And because the intoxicating mix of explosive turbo grunt, tenacious four-wheel-drive grip, and intuitive dual-clutch shift magic makes this 911 incredibly transparent and accessible.
Appearance-wise, the differences between the 2009 and 2010 model 911 Turbo are marginal. Fresh details are limited to a revised front air intake; LED running lights and taillights; optional bixenon cornering lights; slimmer, low-drag sideview mirrors; and larger tailpipes. Inside, we find a redesigned steering wheel with proper shift paddles rather than the clumsy, thumb-operated buttons found in other Porsches (and still standard here). Also part of the upgraded Turbo package are full leather trim, modified instruments with silver faces and white backlighting, the touch-screen navigation system we already know from lesser 911s, and a powerful Bose sound system with thirteen speakers. Among the goodies Porsche still charges extra for are the paddleshift steering wheel, the highly desirable dual-clutch transmission, carbon-ceramic brakes, cruise control, a sunroof, electronic torque vectoring in conjunction with a passive limited-slip differential, and the indispensable Sport Chrono package, which includes active engine mounts and an overboost function.
0912 06 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+center Stack
The Turbo's most elementary new feature is its completely reengineered engine. Although displacement has gone up from 3.6 to 3.8 liters, weight has come down by 26 pounds. The closed-deck, high-compression flat six features a two-piece crankcase, direct fuel injection, a pair of variable-vane turbochargers, more efficient unequal-length tumble-and-roll intake manifolds, and larger intercoolers. As a result, the power output increases from 480 to 500 hp at 6000 rpm, while the maximum preoverboost torque is up from 460 to 480 lb-ft. The torque curve is flat from 1950 to 5000 rpm. In overboost mode, the engine can deliver an even brawnier 516 lb-ft for up to ten seconds. At the same time, Porsche claims that average fuel consumption has decreased by sixteen percent. (U.S. EPA figures aren't yet available, but the company promises that the new 911 Turbo will not be subject to the gas-guzzler tax.) The acceleration time depends on the type of transmission and on whether the vehicle is fitted with the optional Sport Chrono kit, which adds the launch control feature. Although the manual-transmission version zooms from 0 to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds, the PDK variant can do the same job in 3.4 seconds. The combination of Sport Plus and launch control will shave another two-tenths. But never mind. Even at 3.5 seconds, the new Turbo beats the defunct GT2, the Ferrari 599GTB Fiorano, the Chevrolet Corvette Z06, the Lamborghini Gallardo LP560-4, and about nine out of ten supercars we can think of.
0912 09 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+engine
Dynamically, the 2010 model has made a substantial leap ahead. "We wanted to enhance ability without altering the character," confirms senior vehicle line engineer August Achleitner. "The result is a lighter and faster car that is also easier to drive, more comfortable to ride in, and more environmentally friendly. How much faster? Well, on the [Nürburgring's] Nordschleife, we knocked off ten seconds compared to last year's version, and that was even before the team started playing with the Sport Plus calibration and with shaved tires. We also modified the software that masterminds the four-wheel-drive system, chose a slightly more compliant damper setting, and introduced torque vectoring, which automatically decelerates the inner rear wheel on turn-in for more neutral handling behavior. The yaw effect of this momentary brake actuation is supported by the limited-slip diff, the locking ratio of which increases from 22 to 27 percent under trailing throttle. Last but not least, the new 911 Turbo can be ordered with dynamic engine mounts that improve the ride and the directional stability by reducing undue vibrations, minimizing negative inertia effects, and compensating critical axle-load variations."
0912 07 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+steering Wheel Mounted Shift Paddles
It never ceases to amaze how clever fine-tuning can improve a car's overall performance. The outgoing 911 Turbo was a highly competent piece, but compared with the follow-up model, it shows a few rough edges, some dynamic idiosyncrasies, and certain odd handling traits at the limit. One is the relatively abrupt transition from understeer to oversteer, which has now all but disappeared.
0912 01 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front Three Quarter View
Even through corners taken at the limit of adhesion, the 911 Turbo's body motions have been reduced by a tangible amount. On smooth surfaces, the confidence-inspiring chassis will tolerate a more pronounced tail-out attitude than last year's sharper-edged suspension setup. On bumpy surfaces, the new Turbo is more relaxed, avoiding excessive tramlining, terrain-induced steering fight, and overly aggressive front-end pitch.
By changing the spring and damper rates from taut and tough to supple and stable, the Turbo's whole attitude to irritations like bumps, ridges, grooves, dips, and ripples has become more forgiving. The car remains totally connected to the road, it still tracks with absolute accuracy, yet it always stays cool and composed. Its responses are as prompt and unambiguous as ever, but the man/machine interaction is now notably smoother and more consistent.
Sport Plus is best suited for the racetrack, where you can appreciate high revs, late upshifts, early downshifts, generous slip angles, and lightning-fast throttle response. On public roads, however, one is much better off in Sport, which synchronizes the software that governs the dampers, transmission, stability control, and four-wheel-drive system. Sport is also required to free an extra 36 lb-ft of overboost torque, which further beefs up midrange urge between 2100 and 4000 rpm. Redlined at 7000 rpm, the twin-turbo six rarely needs more than 5000 rpm to defend its king-of-the-road status. Unlike the discontinued five-speed Tiptronic transmission, which was too cushy and reluctant to respond to kickdown orders, the new seven-speed dual-clutch automatic will happily shift down two or even three ratios at a time. When you back off and let the engine spin on a long leash, the chips take their time before they eventually call upon the fuel-saving top gear.
0912 05 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+gauge
Predictably, the large, sickle-shaped shift paddles are much nicer to use than the standard shift buttons. But they are attached to the steering wheel, not the column, so it helps to pay attention when winding on more than one handful of lock.
Like very few sports cars, the new 911 Turbo feels at home in all three quintessential speed zones. In the 0-to-60-mph range, spreading the propulsive effort across four wheels leaves ample grip for cornering. In the 60-to-125-mph bracket, the mighty boxer engine, the pragmatically spaced superquick gearbox, and the talented chassis fuse to form a winning team. Through the 125-to-194-mph high-speed zone, the light weight (3461 pounds on manual-transmission models, down 33 pounds), the lifesaving brakes (there's no need to upgrade from the standard cross-drilled and vented cast-iron rotors), and the riveting aerodynamics (serious downforce in the rear, modest lift in the front) effectively smooth out and control the flight path.
0912 03 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+side View
In older 911s, going flat out even on a straight was often a test of courage. In the 2010 Turbo, exploring the car's limits is a reassuringly fearless affair. Although the weight distribution has barely changed since Ferdinand Porsche invented the Volkswagen Beetle, evolutionary engineering and state-of-the-art electronics have since taken the sting out of exploring the Porsche 911 Turbo's true talents. A host of active aids control the torque split between the axles, aerodynamic balance, traction, turn-in, and deceleration, as well as pitch, yaw, and roll. But beware - those who switch off stability control should be prepared to cope with the dark sides of the Turbo, such as abrupt breakaway and lurid oversteer.
The Carrera is just fine for 911 aficionados on a budget. The GT3 is perfect for Sunday morning autobahn blasts and for sessions on the racetrack. The Cabriolet and the Targa are fashion-oriented variations of the same addictive theme. But within the 911 range, the new Turbo is without a doubt the best all-rounder, the best all-road driving tool, the best all-season sports car. In its latest 500-hp guise, it combines supercar guts with rental-car practicality, unites impeccable active safety with dual-clutch efficiency, matches the strongest brakes in the business with the best steering, boasts a made-to-last body and a chassis that has been designed to deliver.
0912 04 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+cockpit
Are there drawbacks? Well, it does drink when pushed, and it could benefit from more focused ergonomics. But when the red light inside your head turns green, this is still the car to beat on that familiar flat-out run from point A to point B. It also is one of the very few high-performance sports cars that feels equally at home on the 'Ring, through a snowstorm, down the autobahn, and in rush-hour traffic. Even though the Turbo is an anachronism as much as it is an icon, the top-of-the-range 911 is, in its latest form, once more a totally fascinating and truly charismatic driving machine.
2010 Porsche 911 Turbo
0912 08 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+side View
base price $133,750
Powertrain
engine: 24-valve DOHC twin-turbocharged flat-6
displacement: 3.8 liters (232 cu in)
horsepower: 500 hp @ 6000 rpm
torqu:e 516 lb-ft @ 2100 rpm
transmission type: 7-speed dual-clutch automatic
drive: 4-wheel
Chassis
steering: Power-assisted rack-and-pinion
suspension, front: Strut-type, coil springs
Suspension, rear: Multilink, coil springs
brakes: Vented discs, ABS
tires: Bridgestone Potenza RE050A
tire size f, r: 235/35YR-19, 305/30YR-19
0912 02 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front View
Measurements
L x W x H: 175.2 x 72.9 x 51.2 in
wheelbase: 92.5 in
track f/r: 58.7/60.9 in
weight: 3516 lb
FUEL mileage: 16/25 mpg (est.)
0910 02 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front Three Quarters View
As we're pulling into the pits following a very sideways lap of Portugal's rain-soaked Estoril race track, I ask my tour guide Walter Röhrl which is his favorite 911. It turns out we're in it - the racing legend lives in an area that gets a good bit of snow, so a rear-drive 911 is out of the question. He drives a four-wheel drive 911 Turbo. And given what I've just experienced from the passenger seat, there's certainly no drawback to having all four of the 911's wheels driven or its engine force-fed by two turbos.
0910 02 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front Three Quarters View
Let's divide this review into two sections - a short Cliffs Notes section, and then a whole lot of rambling about the new Porsche 911 Turbo.
THE CLIFFS NOTES SECTION
All-new 3.8-liter engine with direct injection, 500 hp (20 more than before), direct injection. Higher compression and lower boost pressure reduces on/off effect of turbo lag. Sport Chrono pack gives overboost, bumping peak torque from 479 lb-ft to 516 lb-ft. Recalibrated all-wheel drive system and PASM adaptive suspension for better handling; 10 seconds faster around the Nürburgring than the 2009 Turbo (lap time is now 7m39s) and gets considerably better fuel economy. 6-speed manual is standard, ancient 5-speed automatic replaced by fabulous 7-speed twin-clutch PDK (which has launch control on Sport Chrono cars, and optional steering-wheel mounted shift paddles in place of the backwards buttons that are standard.) Optional center-lock wheels are so gorgeous you'll want to lick them.
THE FULL STORY
Let's cut to the chase: there's little question that the 2010 Porsche 911 Turbo is the best Turbo yet. Is it the best 911? In my book, that position is still occupied by the GT3, the loud, rough, manic, please-put-me-on-a-track 911. The Turbo is far less raw - it's the Grand Tourer of the 911 lineup. It loses a lot of the flat-six soundtrack - the one that raises hairs on the back of your neck - in favor of ludicrous forward thrust and the sound of air rushing through the turbos. But what makes the Turbo so special is that it reduces the GT3's sensory overload to levels more appropriate for daily driving, and the fact that it does so without being any less capable as a sports car.
First of all, with 500 horsepower, it's fast as the dickens. Depending on transmission and trim choices, 60 mph can be yours in as little as 3.2 seconds, according to Porsche. That kind of thrust actually hurts a little. Seriously. In a good way, if you're into that kind of thing - and you probably are if you're reading this part of the review. But to put it in perspective: ever been sitting in the passenger seat of a modern car traveling at 60 mph and the driver suddenly slams on the brakes and comes to a complete stop under full ABS? The force that threw you against your seatbelt and sent your cell phone flying under the dash is about the same as what it feels like to floor the gas pedal in a 911. Just in the opposite direction. Kind of hurts, kind of feels good.
0910 01 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front Three Quarters View
The thrust comes courtesy of a flat-six that Porsche describes as the first all-new engine in the 911 Turbo's 35-year history. For the first time, it uses direct fuel injection, and it's 0.2 liters bigger than the last Turbo mill, displacing 3.8 liters. The switch to direct fuel injection and the larger size have resulted in a gain of only 20 hp, but - and here's the important part - the changes have dramatically reduced turbo lag. The additional displacement means more air flows to the turbochargers, spooling them up more quickly. The compression ratio has been increased from 9.0:1 to 9.8:1, combining with the additional displacement to help produce more power off-boost. And a lower peak boost pressure (11.6 psi, down from 14.5) means less of an on-off switch feeling when the boost does hit.
If ordered with the Sport Chrono package, the computer will allow up to 14.5 psi of boost - resulting in a peak of 516 lb-ft of torque instead of 479 - for ten seconds, albeit over a smaller plateau. The additional midrange alone will knock a tenth of a second off the 0-60 sprint.
Another major driveline change is the long-awaited retirement of the 5-speed Tiptronic automatic transmission. The last 2-pedal 911 Turbo was, frankly, an exercise in frustration: between the engine's prodigious lag and the transmission's widely spaced gear ratios, not to mention its occasional unwillingness to cooperate, the delay between throttle tip-in and the enormous thrust you're waiting for could be measured in months.*
*Slight exaggeration for illustrative purposes only.
That problem has now been completely solved, as Porsche has adapted its 7-speed twin-clutch PDK for use with the Turbo. It has some upgraded hardware and slightly longer third through sixth-gear ratios than in the normally aspirated Carrera models, but in function, it's identical. PDK (short for Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe, which is short for 'Porsche double clutch transmission' and is pronounced Poor-sha duh-pull-coop-loongs-guh-treeb-uh), has six closely spaced gear ratios for fantastic acceleration, and then a long seventh gear for quiet, relaxed, and fuel-efficient high-speed cruising. Porsche is, to date, the only company with this gearing strategy, and they get mad props for it.
0910 03 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+rear Three Quarters View
It's only a personal preference, but I like the extra involvement you get with a 911 - even the turbocharged ones - with the standard six-speed manual. And I like that the Turbo exhibits no lag after a full-throttle shift. Short of having a physical handicap, I couldn't excuse anyone's purchase of a Tiptronic 911, but those days are over. You can't fault someone for choosing a PDK for three reasons: one, it works really, really well as both an automatic and an automated manual. Two, the ultralong seventh gear is fabulous on the highway. And three, Launch Control. Read on.
Launching a 911 is one of the most exhilarating experiences you can ever have in an automobile. It's a violent affair, unfortunately, so much so that if you have any degree of mechanical sympathy, you'll never do it. (And by launching, I mean loads of engine revs and a clutch dump into first gear with the gas pedal on the floor. And lots of wincing.)
If you specify the Sport Chrono package, PDK will do it for you - guilt free. There's apparently no risk of voiding the warranty or grenading the transmission like in a Nissan GT-R; Porsche engineers told me they got bored trying to blow it up after some ridiculous number of consecutive launches, and just gave up.
So without a shred of guilt, you engage Sport Plus mode, turn off PSM, and floor the accelerator pedal while holding the brake. A light in the 3:00-position steering wheel spoke comes on that says "LAUNCH CONTROL," and the magnetorheological engine mounts stiffen in anticipation of a big event. The engine surges to 5000 rpm; it's not a smooth, steady elevated idle, though - the engine computers are obviously playing some tricks to try to generate boost in advance. The turbos whistle, pop, and chatter a little. And when you let your foot off the brake, so does your stomach. You feel like you got punched in the torso as the computer dumps the clutch and the Turbo catapults forward.
With all four wheels spinning, you need to be pretty quick on the steering wheel - the 911 will move around laterally (uh, which means it'll dart around in search of a curb or an oncoming car.) Second gear comes almost instantaneously and with no interruption in power, then third, then fourth, then, oh, hello, Officer. Oh, and your passenger might pass out with fear. If not, he or she will likely be screaming at a pitch slightly higher than that of the police cruiser's siren.
0910 02 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front Three Quarters View
If you really want to scare the daylights out of someone while retaining your license, you'll need a curvy race track. While it's certainly possible to frighten yourself and everyone around you on a curvy public road, that kind of fear is there for a reason. It's a healthy, self-preservation reason.
And besides, 911s aren't the kind of cars to take past their limits on narrow public roads. Their brilliance is how high the limits are, not how easy you can recover once you've blown through them.
On a racetrack, though, you can play with the Turbo in a controlled environment with lots of run off, and that invokes good fear. The Oh-My-God-this-car-isn't-going-to-make-this-curve kind of fear. Because if you know how to handle it, the 911 Turbo will, in fact, make the curve.
Nothing like the widow-maker 911s of yore, modern 911s nevertheless retain the rear-engine tendency towards lift-off oversteer. That feature may be a liability on the street (with stability control switched off), but it makes 911s fabulously throttle-adjustable on the track, and this Turbo is no exception. The last-generation Turbo was very, very fast around a race track, and it would happily powerslide around corner after corner. When you tried to be neat, tidy, and quick, though, it required serious effort: it would understeer on the way into a corner, and then when the boost hit (some measurable time after you squeezed the throttle), it would transition quickly into oversteer. Fun? Yes. Fast? Well, yes, but only if you really, really knew what you were doing. Like, if your name was Walter Röhrl. And more importantly, if you decided to enter a turn sideways - i.e. by lifting off at turn-in to rotate the back end - you had your work cut out for you to gather it back up.
The new Turbo is a lot more forgiving. The transitions between understeer and oversteer are softer, slower, and easier to manage. Thanks to the miserably damp conditions at Estoril, we only managed two laps behind the wheel ourselves, but Porsche did allow us some shotgun rides with their factory drivers.
Luckily, I know that the word "seitwärts" in German means sideways, because ask, and ye shall receive. At least five times over the course of two full-opposite-lock laps of the track, I thought we were headed off the track backwards. Judging by the occasional "oops" coming from the driver's seat, so did the he. But no, the Turbo refused it, gradually shuffling power forward and pulling the car through what seemed to be an unsaveable slide.
0910 01 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+front Three Quarters View
Another new optional feature on the Turbo is Porsche Torque Vectoring, or PTV. This is a predominantly software-based system, unlike other torque-vectoring systems, which use active differentials to shuffle power from one rear wheel to the other. Porsche's system starts with an old-school, passive mechanical limited slip differential, and uses the car's brakes to help rotate the car. Yes, this sounds like stability control, but it's not. Stability control (including Porsche Stability Management, standard on all 911s for quite some time) is an aftertreatment: it helps keep the car on the driver's intended course once the limits of adhesion have been reached. PTV is, on the other hand, a performance-enhancing system that helps to avoid understeer in the first place. It looks at steering angle and lateral acceleration to predict that the car is about to understeer, and intervenes preventatively.
If speed is below 100 mph, lateral acceleration is above about 0.8g and the car is about to understeer, the system applies a very light, largely imperceptible braking force to the inside rear wheel. This creates a yaw moment on the car, helping it to rotate and nixing the understeer. The difference was quite obvious on-track: in slippery conditions, where there wasn't enough grip to activate the system, the Turbo understeered. When it was dry, understeer was only very slight.
PTV will also intervene on a quick-turn in: if it sees the driver heaving the wheel quickly, it'll activate the inside rear brake momentarily. It's like a friend in the passenger seat yanking the emergency brake lightly as you throw the car into a turn, but only on one wheel, and without the evil laugh or increased risk of death, dismemberment, and dissolved friendships.
PTV is a simpler, lighter solution than fully active torque-vectoring rear diffs because it's mostly a stability control software-based system, and requires only a conventional limited slip. While PSM can be fully disabled, PTV remains active, as Porsche sees it as a performance-enhancing system rather than a slow-you-down slap on the wrist. It is, however, disabled when your foot isn't on the gas. Torque-vectoring seems to be a buzzword lately (appearing now in BMWs, Audis, Saabs, Mitsubishi Evos, and of course the original Honda SH-AWD system) but using the term for this system is a little misleading. "Porsche Preventative Understeer Management" (PPUM) would be a more apt descriptor.
Oh, and an apt descriptor for the shift paddles on the optional three-spoke steering wheel would be "Thank God." The standard way to manually shift the PDK without taking your hands off the wheel are ill-placed buttons on the spoke that are wired counterintuitively. Porsche was very quick to point out that journalists have complained about the buttons more than owners, but the fact is, the buttons are backwards from every other manufacturer. (Convention at this point is to pull back using your index finger for an upshift, push using your thumb for a downshift. It's the same logic that's our preferred layout for center-console-mounted shift controls, which Porsche also does the "wrong" way.)
0910 03 Z+2010 Porsche 911 Turbo+rear Three Quarters View
Anyway, the paddles are mounted on the steering wheel rather than the column itself, probably just to annoy us. But they're at least arranged correctly (right paddle us upshift; left is downshift).
The rest of the Turbo, just like other 911s, is a known quantity. It receives a similar facelift to the one given to the rest of the 911 lineup last year, though with turbo-specific air vents and LED daytime running lights. As usual, the interior is stunningly well put together and the chassis - whether you're in the cabriolet or coupe version - is as solid as they come. It's also as expensive as it comes, with the hardtop Turbo starting at $133,750 and the convertible at $144,750. And as always with Porsche, options don't come cheap.
The 911 is a unique combination of driver involvement, luxury, speed, handling, and impeccable build quality. The Turbo adds "muscle car" to that list, combining the GT cars' outrageous straight line speed with daily-driver huge mid-range torque, and with only the slightest of sacrifices to driver involvement. And it's now socially acceptable with two pedals in the driver's footwell.
0904 07 Pl+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+front Three Quarters View
0904 07 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+front Three Quarters View
Halfway around the world, crowds gather at the Shanghai auto show to examine the curiously shaped Porsche Panamera. The first sedan in Porsche's sixty-one-year history looks like a big, stretched, hand-blown 911 - and decidedly unlike anything else on the road. The mere existence of the Panamera is a blow to Porschephiles, proof that their beloved brand's focus is slipping away. Its awkward styling is salt rubbed deep into the wound, and naysayers vilify Porsche boss Wendelin Wiedeking, who, as the story goes, had the roofline raised so he could fit his egomaniacal - and very tall - self in the back seat. Oh, how those purists groan.
But these cries of sorrow fall upon the deaf ears of a small group of journalists terrorizing small towns in the Swabian Alps with excessive horsepower and speed. None of them care about diesel-powered Cayennes or hunchbacked Panameras. Any talk of Porsche selling out is handily drowned out by the 8500-rpm wail of the best sports car in the world, the 2010 Porsche 911 GT3.
0904 03 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+rear View
Of all fourteen roadgoing 911 models, the GT3 is the most potent distillate of Porsche's original mission - the ultimate everyday supercar. Let the poseurs have the Turbos; let the old men drive the base 911 Carreras and their wives the convertibles: this is the 911 that won't sit in Los Angeles traffic or idle impatiently in the sweltering South Beach heat. This is the 911 without a sunroof. It's the 911 that, above all 911s, is meant to be driven flat out.
In fact, 70 percent of GT3 buyers take their machines to the racetrack. The other thirty percent, one assumes, have just gotten lost on the back roads on the way there. The GT3, remember, is a homologation race car, and like all homologation cars, it's built for the street only so its manufacturer can take it racing. Unlike many cars with conflicting missions, it performs exceedingly well on both road and track.
The GT3's second appearance in the 997-chassis 911 includes the visual makeover that freshened the Carrera models last year. And, as in those more street-focused models, the changes aren't merely superficial. The GT3 hasn't gained an ounce, but its engine has been bored out from 3.6 to 3.8 liters. It might now be the same size as the powerplant in the Carrera S, but the only thing the two engines share are their alternators and air-conditioning compressors. The Carrera engine uses a two-piece block, whereas the GT3's is a further evolution of the race-proven GT1 flat six, which uses a separate crankcase and cylinders, seven oil pumps, and eight main bearings. It doesn't receive the directfuel injection found on the Carrera powerplant - adapting that technology to the race engine would require extra expense.
0904 09 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+engine
Sucking in an atomized air/fuel mixture the old-fashioned way, the flat six now revs to 8500 rpm, 100 rpm higher than before and 1000 rpm past the Carrera's redline. It produces 435 hp, an increase of 20, thanks not only to the additional 197 cc but also variable valve timing on both the intake and exhaust tracts. Although the 3.8 retains its predecessor's impressive specific output of 115 hp per liter, it's been tuned for more midrange punch, making it more lively at around-town engine speeds. Despite the variable valve timing, a four-stage intake manifold, and a two-stage exhaust system - all of which help fatten the torque curve - the GT3's engine still needs to be revved to extract its full firepower.
The six-speed manual Getrag transmission (Carrera manuals are manufactured by Aisin) is a high-efficiency unit that allows for the replacement of individual gears to suit the speed requirements of different racetracks. Shift effort is very high - in fact, a little unpleasantly so in traffic - due to the transmission's more durable steel (instead of conventional brass) synchronizer rings and a shifter whose throws are only about half as short as those in the Carrera. According to Porsche engineers, the effort will relax as the transmission breaks in, but even still, the heavy shifter is matched in feel to the heavy clutch.
0904 04 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+front Seats
Purists might notice that we didn't mention the PDK. Indeed, Porsche's dual-clutch transmission isn't available on the GT3. As good as it is (and it's one of the best), real Porsche racing cars don't have transmissions that can shift by themselves, and engineering appropriate longevity into a sequential race box for use on the street would be too difficult, so this 911 keeps a real manual. We applaud Porsche's engineers fortheir decision.
Like before, the GT3 comes standard with PASM suspension, which uses recalibrated computer-controlled Bilstein dampers that are continually, and steplessly, adjusted during driving. The system has two modes - normal and sport, the latter giving slightly better performance only on the smoothest tracks. Multiple upgrades were made to the suspension, including increasing the front spring rate and size of the rear antiroll bar. The brake discs on all GT3s now measure an enormous 15.0 inches in the frontand 13.8 inches out back, with aluminum hubs that eliminate five pounds of rotatingunsprung mass. Carbon-ceramic brakes are, as before, an expensive option, but they savean astonishing 44 pounds overall.
0904 01 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+rear Three Quarters View
For the first time, the GT3 is available with stability control. This version of the system was developed specifically for this track-ready 911 and can be partially disabled, leaving only traction control (which was available on the previous GT3), or it can be switched off completely. It's programmed to intervene early and gently, rather than late and abruptly, so it's less likely to interrupt a driver's rhythm on the track.
Another first for the GT3 is center-lock wheels. One large nut, similar to those used on the Carrera GT, replaces the conventional five bolts on each wheel. Porsche claims that the change was made to help racers change their tires more quickly and to reduce weight (it saves more than five pounds). One drawback is that the nut must be torqued to more than 365 lb-ft, which is a difficult task. A torque-multiplying wrench is available - but it comes at an additional cost, of course. As does a set of spare wheels, which, thanks to the unique mounting design, can be purchased only directly from Porsche.
Form truly follows function with the GT3, so although some touches look boy-racerish, they're all functional. For example, the vertical slits in the rear bumper help evacuate heat from the engine compartment. The wide rear spoiler incorporates ram-air intakes for the engine. And the center grille atop the front bumper is used to pull air through the center-mounted, third radiator, creating downforce in the process.
0904 05 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+wheel
In fact, that downforce is the biggest difference between this GT3 and the previous model. Porsche claims that the last GT3 exerted about 65 pounds more pressure on the road when traveling at 186 mph than it did when standing still, whereas the new GT3 allegedly produces 220 pounds of downforce at that speed. More significant, almost 90 of those pounds are over the front axle, where there were almost none before and where a 911 Carrera would experience significant lift. The result is dramatically increased stability at very high speeds - the GT3's front end no longer wanders at speeds approaching its 193-mph terminal velocity.
One new item will help the GT3's behavior when launching from rest: optionalmagnetorheological engine mounts firm up quickly in response to high engine loads.
The more rigid connection reduces the chance for axle hop on aggressive clutch-dump launches, helping the Porsche jump off the line more quickly.
0904 02 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+front Three Quarters View
But remember - this 911 isn't really about its 0-to-60-mph time. Unlike the videogame-like Nissan GT-R or even Porsche's own 911 Turbo, it doesn't accept better numbers if they come at the expense of driver involvement. The only other roadgoing car this visceral, direct, and communicative is the Lotus Elise. Where the Lotus fails - in its ability to attract drivers other than the hardest of the hard-core - the Porsche shines. The GT3 is, plainly put, the most successful marriage of racetrack prowess, roadgoing pleasure, and, yes, luxury in the automotive world.
0904 08 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+front Three Quarters View
Around town, the GT3 shows off its climate control, touchscreen nav, and beautifully crafted, Alcantara-lined interior. It even features a front-end-lift system to protect its low front spoiler while pulling into gas stations and driveways. On the back roads, its accurate and talkative steering gives the driver the ability to place the car within millimeters of his desired trajectory. The ferocious bark of its flat six - a sound track straight out of the good old air-cooled days - warns of its arrival thousands of feet in advance. And on the track, the 911's logic-defying ability to put power to the ground and its unflappable brakes complete the package. You can be as upset as you like at the arrival of the Panamera. Go ahead and cry your eyes out over the arrival of a diesel-powered Cayenne.
But, when the same company that builds those four-doors also makes a car like the GT3, there is simply no way to argue that Porsche has lost its way.
0904 10 Z+porsche 911 Turbo+walter Rohrl
Nordschleife Numbers
The GT3 isn't concerned with numbers, unless those numbers happen to be lap times at the Nürburgring Nordschleife. Porsche über-driver Walter Röhrl can manage laps consistent to within about a half-second on the thirteen-mile Green Hell.
Here are some approximate lap times to show how the GT3 stacks up against the rest of the Porsche lineup.
  • 911 Carrera: 8:05

  • 911 Carrera S with Sport package: 7:56

  • 911 Turbo: 7:50

  • 911 GT3 (2008): 7:45

  • 911 GT3 (2010): 7:40

  • 911 GT2: 7:32

  • Carrera GT: 7:31
Specifications
0904 06 Z+2010 Porsche 911 GT3+front Interior
Base price $113,150
Powertrain
Engine: 3.8-liter DOHC 24-valve flat-6
Power: 435 hp @ 7600 rpm
Torque: 317 lb-ft @ 6250 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Drive: Rear-wheel
Chassis
Steering: Power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Suspension, front: Strut-type,coil springs
Suspension, rear: Multilink, coil springs
Brakes: Vented discs, ABS
Measurements
L x W x H: 175.6 x 71.2 x 50.4 in
Wheelbase: 92.7 in
Track, f/r: 58.9/60.0 in
Weight: 3076 lb (per manufacturer)
Fuel Mileage: 15/22 mpg (est.)
2010 Porsche 911
2010 Porsche 911
In the last half century, there is no sports car, perhaps no car of any kind, more iconic and instantly recognizable, than the Porsche 911. Whether it's winning races worldwide or providing perennial smiles for owners, versions of the 911 continue to be the brass ring other auto makers strive for.

From its air cooled engine roots, the 911 has a long way. The engine still hangs out over the rear axle, though the air cooling is now gone. Giving way to liquid cooling some years ago and benefiting from its improved cooling performance. While the 911 has gone through many generations, you won't see the large changes between generations as you might with other models. The engineers at Stuttgart are well aware that their customers are happy with the current models and will only accept evolutionary and not revolutionary changes to the car as a whole.

The engines available for the 911 are all powerful, but they do offer a variety of power plants to choose from. Its base 3.8 liter V-6 makes 345 Hp. Power increases through the models up the 500 HP Turbo versions.
2010 Porsche 911 GT3 Front Three Quarter
2010 Porsche 911 GT3 The Problem: The high-performance Porsche 911 GT3, which produced 435 hp, as well as its 450-hp GT3 RS cousin, have unique center-lock wheels. The setup, originally created for racers who wanted to swap wheels more quickly, saves at least five pounds per wheel but requires owners to apply nearly 400 lb-ft of torque to the center nut. Porsche's recommended maintenance intervals may not be sufficient to keep the system in good shape, and the 911 GT3's rear wheel hubs could fail prematurely. That could be problematic in a sports car that can hit 194 mph. The Fix: Porsche will replace the rear wheel hubs, and also will give owners an updated maintenance schedule designed to keep the hubs in working order for longer. The recall starts this month. Number of Vehicles Potentially Affected: 455 Porsche 911 GT3 models built between May 2009 and February 2010. Given the limited appeal and high price of the cars, which kept sales volumes low, the recall covers just about all GT3s produced during that period. Source: NHTSA
Porsche Driveway
McMansions and long driveways go hand in hand, but few could double as a racetrack.
ZR1 Preview
The last time Chevrolet sent their flagship Corvette ZR1 around the famed Nürburgring with chassis engineer Jim Mero behind the wheel in 2008, Chevrolet returned with a perfectly respectable lap time of 7:26.4. That lap time stood as the record for a production car around the famed 13 mile track for all of a month until a Ferrari Enzo beat its time. However, Chevy recently had another crack at it with Jim Mero at the helm again, and this time the ZR1 shaved an impressive six seconds off of its lap time, completing the green hell in 7:19.4.
Lexus Lfa Nissan Gt R Porsche 911 Gt2 Rs
How can you go wrong with a three-lap race between some of the world’s greatest sports cars? Well, you can’t. This video roundup pits the Lexus LFA, the Nissan GT-R, the Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, the Porsche 911 GT2 RS, and the Ferrari F430 GT3 against one another in a three-lap battle at Japan’s Fuji Circuit.
2012 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Gts Coupe Cabriolet
Can there truly ever be too much of a good thing? Porsche doesn’t think so. In fact, there are now 25 different flavors of the 911 presently available to consumers, thanks in part to the introduction of thenew 2012 911 Carrera 4 GTS Coupe and Cabriolet.

Change Vehicle

Research Now

Certified Pre-Owned 2010 Porsche 911 Pricing

Certified Pre Owned Price
$46,675

Used 2010 Porsche 911 Values / Pricing

Suggested Retail Price
$77,800

Free Price Quote

Compare dealer clearance prices and save.
Select this Vehicle

Compare The 2010 Porsche 911

Click Circles to Compare

Your Selected Vehicle's Ranking

rank
2
2010 Porsche 911
2010 Porsche 911
Carrera RWD 2-Dr Coupe H6
18 MPG City | 25 MPG Hwy
Top Ranking Vehicles - MPG
rank
1
2010 Lotus Exige
S 260 RWD 2-Dr Coupe I4
20 MPG City | 26 MPG Hwy
rank
2
2010 Porsche 911
2010 Porsche 911
Carrera RWD 2-Dr Coupe H6
18 MPG City | 25 MPG Hwy
rank
3
rank
4
2010 BMW 6-Series
650i RWD 2-Dr Coupe V8
15 MPG City | 23 MPG Hwy
rank
21
2010 Porsche 911
2010 Porsche 911
Carrera RWD 2-Dr Coupe H6
$77,800
Top Ranking Vehicles - Price
rank
5
2010 Porsche 911
2010 Porsche 911
Carrera RWD 2-Dr Coupe H6
345hp
Top Ranking Vehicles - Horsepower
rank
5
2010 Porsche 911
2010 Porsche 911
Carrera RWD 2-Dr Coupe H6
345hp

2010 Porsche 911 Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
3.6L H6Engine
Fuel economy City:
18 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
25 MPG
Horsepower:
345 hp @ 6500rpm
Torque:
288 ft lb of torque @ 4400rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation (optional)
Vehicle
50,000 miles / 48 months
Powertrain
50,000 miles / 48 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 120 months
Roadside
50,000 miles / 48 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:10
Component
WHEELS:LUGS/NUTS/BOLTS
Summary
PORSCHE IS RECALLING CERTAIN MODEL YEAR 2010-2011, 911 TURBO; TURBO S, 911 GT3, GT3 RS AND GT2 RS HIGH PERFORMANCE VEHICLES, MANUFACTURED FROM MAY 18, 2009 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 17, 2010, AND EQUIPPED WITH CENTER LOCKING HUB AND WHEEL ASSEMBLIES. OVER TIME THE HUBS CAN WEAR PREMATURELY.
Consequences
AS THE HUBS WEAR, THE WHEELS COULD LOOSEN, INCREASING THE RISK OF A CRASH.
Remedy
DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE CENTRAL LOCKING HUBS AND WHEELS WITH AN IMPROVED DESIGN, FREE OF CHARGE. THE SAFETY RECALL BEGAN ON JUNE 28, 2011. OWNERS MAY CONTACT PORSCHE AT 1-800-767-7243.
Potential Units Affected
1,702
Notes
PORSCHE CARS NORTH AMERICA, INC.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:21
Component
SUSPENSION:REAR:AXLE:SPINDLE
Summary
Porsche is recalling certain model year 2010 911 GT3 vehicles manufactured May 15, 2009, through February 11, 2010. The rear wheel hubs may be prone to failure under certain driving conditions. Also, the original, suggested maintenance intervals may be insufficient to prevent wheel hub failure.
Consequences
If the rear hub fails, there may be a loss of vehicle control, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Porsche will notify owners, and dealers will replace the wheel hubs on the rear axle free of charge. The service interval specifications will also be revised and provided to owners as part of Porsche's owner notification letter. The recall began on January 22, 2013. Owners may contact Porsche at 1-800-767-7243.
Potential Units Affected
455
Notes
PORSCHE CARS NORTH AMERICA, INC.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:21
Component
WHEELS:CAP/COVER/HUB
Summary
Porsche is recalling certain model year 2010 911 GT3 vehicles manufactured May 15, 2009, through February 11, 2010. The rear wheel hubs may be prone to failure under certain driving conditions. Also, the original, suggested maintenance intervals may be insufficient to prevent wheel hub failure.
Consequences
If the rear hub fails, there may be a loss of vehicle control, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Porsche will notify owners, and dealers will replace the wheel hubs on the rear axle free of charge. The service interval specifications will also be revised and provided to owners as part of Porsche's owner notification letter. The recall began on January 22, 2013. Owners may contact Porsche at 1-800-767-7243.
Potential Units Affected
455
Notes
PORSCHE CARS NORTH AMERICA, INC.


NHTSA Rating Front Driver
No Test Planned
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
No Test Planned
NHTSA Rating Front Side
No Test Planned
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
No Test Planned
NHTSA Rating Rollover
No Test Planned
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
N/R
IIHS Overall Side Crash
N/R
IIHS Best Pick
N/R
IIHS Rear Crash
N/R
IIHS Roof Strength
N/R
NHTSA Rating Overall
N/R

Find Used Porsche 911s For Sale

Search through millions of listings in the Automobile Magazine classifieds