2013 Nissan Pathfinder

S FWD 4-Dr Sport Utility V6

2013 nissan pathfinder Reviews and News

2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Vs 2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum 4WD Front View
When you're out there in America on your summer vacation, the three-row family crossover is what you see.
Over the past week, we've compared eight of the best all-wheel-drive, three-row family crossovers that you'll find on the highway today. We've driven all of them at the same time on the same roads, and we've made our notes and organized our facts and then argued about the results. And now we've sorted them out and separated the best from the rest.
These family crossovers include: 2013 Chevrolet Traverse, 2013 Dodge Durango, 2013 Ford Explorer, 2013 Honda Pilot, 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe, 2013 Mazda CX-9, 2013 Nissan Pathfinder, and 2013 Toyota Highlander.
You can read about the mission we set for ourselves on Day One and, the driving report for each vehicle, either on Day Two or Day Three. On Day 4, the tournament got tougher, as our smart-ass comments make painfully clear. Here we present the final match between the 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe and 2013 Nissan Pathfinder.
On this final day, the process involves less driving and a lot more arguing, as the comments below indicate. It's not just about whether these family crossovers excel in this category -- because they all do -- but instead it's about finding the right kind of combination that meets our expectations.

Hyundai Santa Fe vs. Nissan Pathfinder

2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited
The 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe drives like the car-like crossover that everyone wants, blending around-town maneuverability with highway comfort. More surprising is its ability as a utility vehicle, because it has a package that's always useful, whether you're hauling people or all that vacation stuff that people bring along with them.
The Building Blocks
At the heart of the 2013 Santa Fe lies a Hyundai Sonata, and that's a fine thing to have these daysHyundai's popular mid-size sedan. This crossover's wheelbase stretches 110.2 inches, and the overall package measures 193.1 inches in overall length, 74.2 inches wide and 66.5 inches high.
There's 146.6 cubic feet of passenger volume within, including 41.3 inches of front- seat legroom, 41.3 inches of second-row legroom, and 31.5 inches of third-row legroom. You can pack 80.0 cubic feet of cargo behind the front seats, 40.9 cubic feet of cargo behind the second-row seats, and 13.5 cubic -feet of stuff behind the third-row seats.
This all-wheel-drive Santa Fe is motivated by a 3.3-liter V-6 that makes 290 hp and 252 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission helps the 4297-lb Limited model get 18 mpg City/24 mpg Highway/20 mpg Combined. The bottom line as you leave the dealership is $38,840.
What We Said
For us, the interior is the most important part of a three-row crossover. It's made to carry people and some of their stuff, and everyday goodness probably is more important than all-day comfort. Even so, we appreciate the finer things in life and this 2013 Santa Fe looks like a premium vehicle, with a fine mix of soft-touch materials and interesting color choices.
It's easy to climb in and out of the 2013 Santa Fe, and we found plenty of cupholders and entertainment choices, which is what we were looking for in a lunch-hour foray to the Sonic drive-in. At the same time, we were reminded again that third-row seats are always just for kids, and the Santa Fe's example proved more unpleasant than we expected, since the seats themselves are lower, thinner, and generally less accommodating than those in the Nissan Pathfinder (such a design, though, makes for a flat, useful cargo floor when the seat is folded down). The Santa Fe regains the advantage when it comes time to carry stuff rather than people, because its third- and second-row seats fold faster and with less effort.
It might be surprising, but the 2013 Santa Fe impresses with its sheer muscle, which is the dimension where you want a utility vehicle to set itself apart from a daily sedan. It's one of the most powerful vehicles in our test with 290 hp and yet is also one of the lightest at 4297 pounds. Hyundai says it'll tow up to 5000 pounds.
2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum
In one bold step Nissan has left behind the SUV personality that used to define the Pathfinder and substituted instead a people-oriented characterpersona that emphasizes highway comfort. When it comes time to move people around, the 2013 Nissan Pathfinder sets itself apart.
The Building Blocks
The 2013 Pathfinder takes its personality from the Nissan Altima sedan that you'll find under its skin, as it goes down the highway with an easy-riding rhythm. Its wheelbase measures 114.2 inches, while overall length stretches 197.2 inches, width measures 77.2 inches, and overall height measures 69.6 inches.
The specifications say that this is a larger vehicle than the Santa Fe with 157.8 cubic feet of interior volume. At the same time, the difference is actually a little hard to find, as the Pathfinder has 42.3 inches of front- seat legroom, 41.7 inches of second-row legroom, and 30.7 inches of third-row legroom. You can pack 79.8 cubic feet of cargo behind the front seats, 47.8 cubic feet behind the second-row seat (42.4 cubic feet with fixed captain's chairs instead of the sliding bench), and 16.0 cubic -feet of stuff behind the third-row seats..
This all-wheel-drive Pathfinder is powered by a 3.5-liter V-6 that makes 260 hp and 240 lb-ft of torque. A continuously variable transmission (CVT) helps this 4471-lb Platinum model get 19 mpg City/25 mpg Highway/21 mpg Combined. The bottom line as you leave the dealership is $44,395.
What We Said
When you climb into the 2013 Pathfinder, you're almost certain that you're sitting in an Altima sedan, as the dashboard architecture and puffy, comforted-oriented seats suggest. Although the specifications suggest that the Pathfinder should have a slight margin of interior space over the Hyundai Santa Fe, it went pretty well unnoticed by us. Otherwise it certainly seemed much like a luxury car.
It takes 12.7 seconds to fold down the Pathfinder's second- and third-row seats compared to the 5.3 seconds it takes to fold down the Santa Fe seats (remote latches for the second-row seats make such quickness possible). Meanwhile, the third-row seat seems is more accommodating, another attribute of the comfort-oriented seat design. At the same timeAlas, the Platinum edition's overstuffed upholstery makes a big difference in the character of the Pathfinder's load floor, as the seats don't fold flat and create an inclined load floor.
Nissan has done great work with CVT design, and the match pairing of between this one and the Pathfinder's 3.5-liter V-6 results in good drivability and fuel efficiency around town. is a good one, and the result is very drivable and very fuel efficient around town. At the same timeStill, this 260-hp engine has 4471 lbs with which to contend, so it prefers to cruise rather than accelerate noisily. Nevertheless, Nissan has taken some measures to ensure the Pathfinder can do the job as a tow vehicle and it's rated at 5,000 lbs in this capacity.
Winner: 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe
Think Inside Out
If you don't look too closely, it's easy to think that all three-row family crossovers are the same. You simply combine a car-like body with truck-like SUV styling, then add all-wheel -drive for meeting the challenge of driving in all kinds of weather.
Yet the precise blend of car and truck still varies from vehicle to vehicle, and, boy, does it matter. Some vehicles, like the Ford Explorer and Honda Pilot, fall toward the truck side of the spectrum, a little less refined than the others. Meanwhile, the Mazda CX-9 and Toyota Highlander drive exactly like cars, but they give up some utility to do so, notably in the comfortable spaciousness you want, even for the kids in the way-back row.
Within the middle, things are evolving quickly, and a vehicle like the Chevrolet Traverse that seemed like an amazing expression of modernity a second ago is now trying to keep up. At the leading edge we find crossovers that match style with refinement, as the 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe and 2013 Nissan Pathfinder showed us as we posed them in front of our snappy Euro-style hotel in Holland, Michigan.
As a group, we think this is particularly true of the Santa Fe. It has both amenities and the appearance to be a premium vehicle, especially with this model's dramatic saddle-brown seat upholstery and soft-touch trim. The Hyundai also sets itself apart with its exterior styling, since as it maintains the distinctive proportions of a utility vehicle even as it aspires to something more than truckiness.
Smooth utility
Utility is still the name of the game here. While a crossover might spend most of its life trundling between home, school, and the store, it must have the ability to do so safely in all kinds of weather, so all-wheel -drive and an appropriate safety net of driving-related electronics are required. In addition, a family vehicle like this should be capable of crossing over into adventure during a family vacation.
The 2013 Pathfinder and 2013 Pathfinder are both good at what they do. To us, the Pathfinder seems more at home cruising steadily down the Interstate like the Altima from which it is derived. It's a fine people-carrier, a luxury car with more capability than most people will ever appreciate.
Yet we still prefer the way that the 2013 Santa Fe adapts to the unexpected, whether it's weaving through an alley with only a couple inches of clearance on either side or taking the back road to the tulip farm. The Hyundai keeps its composure even when the road surface doesn't, accelerates in a resolute way that reassures you, and gives you a broad field of view from the driver seat in a way that makes you feel safe.
What we've learned
The crossover still seems to us like the most popular package in America, as the strong sales of each of these vehicles should prove to all.
But for us, the 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe points the way forward. It is a vehicle that has its utility act together, yet doesn't sacrifice too much in terms of weight, power, and fuel economy to do so. It can easily be reconfigured into one of many forms depending on whether your destination is the school, the store, or the tulip farm in Holland, Michigan. It has the technology that you should have to ensure safe transportation for your family, yet not so much that the price will steal your breath away.
And just as important, the 2013 Santa Fe looks and feels great while doing so. We'll admit that we like a certain measure of niceness in our utility vehicles, and this Hyundai lives up to our expectations in terms of looks and refinement.
Greatness is made up from a little bit of everything, and this is as true of family crossovers as it is of luxury sedans. The Hyundai Santa Fe is the new benchmark for us.
Final Four Comparison Front View
This is Automobile Magazine's Family Crossover Comparo, our comparison test of the kind of vehicle that you see during America's summer vacation, the three-row family crossover.
Final Four Comparison Front View
As we noted in our Day One introduction, we've gathered eight of the best all-wheel-drive, seven-passenger family crossovers, and we're going to sort them out. We've driven all of them at the same time on the same roads, and we've made our notes and organized our facts and then argued about the results.
The way we see it, these are the best family crossovers available in America right now. We've done our best to ensure that our test vehicles represent a useful level of features -- nicely equipped, as they say -- yet don't cost too much. Given the practical realities of acquiring so many test vehicles at the same time, they aren't all priced exactly the same, but we've done our best.
These family crossovers include: 2013 Chevrolet Traverse, 2013 Dodge Durango, 2013 Ford Explorer, 2013 Honda Pilot, 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe, 2013 Mazda CX-9, 2013 Nissan Pathfinder and 2013 Toyota Highlander.
  • 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe prevailed over the 2013 Dodge Durango
  • 2013 Honda Pilot bested the 2013 Ford Explorer
  • 2013 Mazda CX-9 edged out the 2013 Chevrolet Traverse
  • 2013 Nissan Pathfinder knocked out the 2013 Toyota Highlander
As the tournament continues, the competition involves less driving and a lot more arguing, as the comments below indicate. It's not just about whether these family crossovers excel in this category -- because they all do -- but instead it's about finding the right kind of combination that meets our expectations.
As the tournament continues, here are the match-ups for our Final Four:
  • 2013 Honda Pilot vs. 2013 Nissan Pathfinder
  • 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe vs. 2013 Mazda CX-9

Honda Pilot vs. Nissan Pathfinder

2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum
  • The Pathfinder ticks a lot of the right boxes for us. There's a yin for every yang, yet it all evens out to a pretty good car.
  • "The suspension pounds the road, and you feel like you're wheeling around a mini bus," says Joe DeMatio.
  • "It's anonymously attractive," says Donny Nordlicht. Another editor responds, "Like a Labrador retriever, or black dress pants."
  • Shade of Gray: Arctic Blue. It's blue, no doubt about it, but the Pathfinder somehow turns gray when surrounded by seven gray cars. Are there really fifty shades of gray?
  • A nice manifestation of big crossover ideals. It looks big outside, but it's also big inside. So that's good. Also, it has excellent fit and finish.
  • Continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) isn't bad, but we'd prefer a conventional automatic transmission. Feel>fuel.
  • "Wasn't the Pathfinder cool?" asks a young editor. "Totally," replies old dog DeMatio. "No one who used to own a Pathfinder would own this thing, but you'd be a complete idiot to throw out such an iconic nameplate."
  • Emergency second- and third-row fold-down time: 12.7 seconds. You'll get wet trying to load up your groceries in the rain, but it's just water, people.
  • Panoramic sunroof is a must for third-row passengers. Otherwise, pray they're not claustrophobic.
  • "It's a Nissan that presents itself as a luxury car," says Michael Jordan. "It makes me less impressed with the Infiniti JX35," replies David Zenlea.

2013 Honda Pilot Touring 4WD Vs 2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum 4WD Front Left Side View
2013 Honda Pilot Touring
  • Sales don't lie -- this is the most popular vehicle in this group among the American public, and by a large margin.
  • "It's the Wrangler jeans of the group -- it makes a lot of sense, but hell if I want to be seen in it."
  • "It's a box and it drives like a box, but it's a very useful and well-built box," says DeMatio.
  • It's an appliance.
  • Shade of Gray: Alabaster Silver.
  • Most of us don't have kids, but forward-facing LATCH anchors in the third row are essential to some people, like proud dad Rusty Blackwell. Can you guess which of these four had them? Yep: "Two in the third row," notes Blackwell, "and six in the second row, which is impressive."
  • Honda has brand equity. You know that, when you buy this Honda Pilot as a used vehicle in five years, it'll run for at least another eight years.
  • Emergency second- and third-row fold-down time: 13.7 seconds. That extra second over the Pathfinder might not seem like a lot, but what if you're trying to load up your groceries in the rain when zombies come out of nowhere? It could mean life or death…
  • "You wouldn't want to take the Pilot on a road trip," says Jordan. "It's made only for trips to and from the soccer field."
  • The Pilot is fortunate to have Honda's reputation of reliability attached to it. Otherwise, it probably wouldn't be a top seller.
2013 Honda Pilot Touring 4WD Vs 2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum 4WD Rear Right Side View
The 2013 Honda Pilot is functional, straightforward, and as boring to drive as it is to look at. The 2013 Nissan Pathfinder is functional, too, but it leans toward passenger comfort rather than all-around utility. Because this reflects our own choices in the way we drive crossovers, the Pathfinder is awarded the win. - Christopher Nelson
Winner: 2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum. The Pathfinder moves into the final round.

Hyundai Santa Fe vs. Mazda CX-9

2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited
  • This is the biggest surprise of the day. No one expected this crossover to make it past the first round, or be as good as it is. And it's pretty damn good.
  • "How much horsepower does that V-6 engine have?" "290." "Wow, it felt like more than that."
  • The third-row seats are bolted directly to the floor, and the second-row seats shake when no one is sitting in them and the car is in motion.
  • Shade of Gray: Iron Frost.
  • The greatest panoramic sunroof we've seen aside from that of the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque. Definitely worth springing for the $2900 Technology package.
  • It feels agile and light on winding roads, although not as sporty as, say, the Mazda CX-9.
  • Shifts from the transmission are slow but not clunky. It's a wash.
  • Emergency second- and third-row fold-down time: 5.3 seconds. (Quick time assist goes to the two handles on both sides of the cargo area that remotely fold down the second-row seats.) Forget the zombies; they'll never catch you. You might not even get wet when you're trying to load up your groceries in the rain.
  • Things that make this your classic Hyundai: finish that's much better than fit; rear suspension that clunks over road imperfections; and a sport mode that changes steering effort and nothing else.
  • "I'm blown away," says DeMatio. "Getting into this car reminded me that crossover interiors don't have to be grim and depressing. This is the most carefully packaged vehicle in the group."

2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Vs 2013 Mazda CX 9 Grand Touring AWD Front View
2013 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring
  • People like us -- people who care about the driving experience -- will err on the side of the Mazda. But most people -- those who actually buy seven-passenger crossovers -- won't.
  • "Mazda nails the basic dynamic qualities that other automakers overlook, which makes this the most enjoyable seven-passenger crossover to drive," says Zenlea.
  • Worst third-row seating of the bunch. Tiny side windows, no panoramic sunroof, and no cup holders. And it's not if you'll fit, it's how you'll fit. Knees up, heads down.
  • Shade of Gray: Meteor Gray.
  • "The interior is a horror story -- a black hole," says Jordan. "Really?" replies Nordlicht. "I think it's upscale without being pretentious."
  • 22 mpg on the highway? Yeah, this old Ford V-6 needs to go away.
  • If you want to see what the outside temperature is, why do you have to press the "outside" button? Why can't it just always be on display?
  • Emergency second- and third-row fold-down time: 25.4 seconds. If you're loading up your groceries in the rain when zombies attack, getting wet is the least of your worries. Leave the food, or the zombies will eat you.
  • "The seats make you sit very upright," says Jordan. "It's like you're getting your portrait done."
  • "The CX-9 is a fabulous value," says Nordlicht.
2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Vs 2013 Mazda CX 9 Grand Touring AWD Rear View
The Mazda is the best driver's crossover, but it's too one-dimensional to be a family-friendly beach cruiser. We're as shocked as you are, but it seems like the new Hyundai Santa Fe is going to upset an Automobile Magazine favorite. - Christopher Nelson
Winner: 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited. The Santa Fe moves into the final round.
Come back to automobilemag.com tomorrow for a head-to-head comparison of our finalists (we go to a local drive-in for an old-fashioned, family-style meal) and to find out which crossover comes out on top.
2013 Chevrolet Traverse AWD 2LT Vs 2013 Mazda CX 9 Front View
This is Automobile Magazine's Family Crossover Comparo, our comparison test of the kind of vehicle that you see during America's summer vacation, the three-row family crossover.
As we noted in our Day One introduction, we've gathered eight of the best all-wheel-drive, seven-passenger family crossovers, and we're going to sort them out. We've driven all of them at the same time on the same roads, and we've made our notes and organized our facts and then argued about the results.
The way we see it, these are the best family crossovers available in America right now. We've done our best to ensure that our test vehicles represent a useful level of features -- nicely equipped, as they say -- yet don't cost too much. Given the practical realities of acquiring so many test vehicles at the same time, they aren't all priced exactly the same, but we've done our best.
These family crossovers are: 2013 Chevrolet Traverse, 2013 Dodge Durango, 2013 Ford Explorer, 2013 Honda Pilot, 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe, 2013 Mazda CX-9, 2013 Nissan Pathfinder and 2013 Toyota Highlander.
To make our comparisons as direct as we can, we've organized a different kind of testing scheme. Yesterday, we presented an accounting of four vehicles in two head-to-head matchups. Today, we're doing the same thing, matching four vehicles and knocking two of them out of contention. The winning vehicles from today and yesterday will go head-to-head in a Final Four comparison on Thursday, and we will declare the winner on Friday.
  • 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe prevailed over the 2013 Dodge Durango
  • 2013 Honda Pilot bested the 2013 Ford Explorer
Today the competition continues with these randomly selected match-ups:
  • 2013 Chevrolet Traverse vs. 2013 Mazda CX-9
  • 2013 Nissan Pathfinder vs. 2013 Toyota Highlander

2013 Chevrolet Traverse vs. 2013 Mazda CX-9

2013 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring AWD
2013 Chevrolet Traverse AWD 2LT Vs 2013 Mazda CX 9 Front View
Although it has had as many mild facelifts as a Hollywood housewife, the Mazda CX-9 hasn't changed much since it went on sale some six years ago. Not that it has had to, since we called it "one of the best-handling big crossovers on the market" when it became a 2008 Automobile Magazine All-Star.
The 2013 Mazda CX-9 has not changed much since then because, like a shark, the CX-9 has not had to evolve to remain at the top of the food chain. Even so, it is now reasserting itself among the crossover competition with its most significant refresh to date (even though calling it "significant" is generous). The most noticeable changes can be seen on the front fascia, where Mazda tweaked the grille, headlights, and ducts. Otherwise, it's business as usual.
Doing the Utility Thing
The CX-9 still has 17.2 cubic feet of cargo space when all the seats are upright. With both the second- and third-row seats folded flat, you're looking at 100.7 cubic feet of cargo space. This may seem like a lot, but the cargo area feels as long and as narrow as a hotel hallway, so packing isn't easy. Sitting in the third-row seat is also a tight fit, even for grade-schoolers.
So, while the 2013 CX-9 doesn't do the functional thing as well as it might, it still drives well. Calling the seven-passenger, all-wheel-drive Mazda "sporty" is a stretch, but it's an apt term when you compare it to the company it keeps. The 4552-pound CX-9's suspension is damped well. The steering is reassuringly direct -- if you were to drive a minivan for comparison, it would feel like you're steering an elephant with its ears. Even so, when you arc the CX-9 through a tight corner, you know you're in a seven-passenger crossover, not a Miata. Things this big don't rock; they roll.
Drive Away for Less
Regardless, the 2013 Mazda CX-9 feels like a much smaller vehicle than it is. You get that vibe from the driver's seat, too. Part of the reason might be the 3.5-liter V-6 with its output of 273 hp and 270 lb-ft of torque, which works well with a six-speed automatic transmission that changes ratios pretty frequently to make the most of the power. It gets 16 mpg city/22 mpg highway.
The Mazda CX-9 also remains a great value. The price for this Grand Touring model is $39,605, and it has a long list of standard luxury features, such as 20-inch wheels, rain-sensing windshield wipers, automatic xenon headlights, automatic tri-zone climate control, a rearview camera, a blind-spot monitoring system, and keyless entry and ignition.
So there you have it: the 2013 Mazda CX-9 is a lot of the same with a touch of new. Put another way, it is exactly what the Mazda CX-9 needs to stay relevant. -- Christopher Nelson
2013 Chevrolet Traverse AWD 2LT
2013 Chevrolet Traverse AWD 2LT Vs 2013 Mazda CX 9 Rear View
The Chevrolet Traverse is another crossover that's trying to stay relevant. The Traverse helped dig GM out of the grave it buried itself in four years ago, yet what has the Traverse received in the way of thanks? It wasn't until the introduction of the 2013 Traverse that this seven-passenger, all-wheel-drive crossover received an overdue allotment of updates.
The first thing you'll notice is that the 2013 Chevrolet Traverse is much prettier than its predecessor. Chevy massaged every inch of the Traverse's sheetmetal, a task we think was well worth the investment. The Chevy version of GM's big crossover also has received some major interior upgrades, including a 6.5-inch touchscreen interface and a rearview camera as standard equipment.
Big Space, Lots of Stuff
This Traverse has a long list of standard luxury equipment, comparable to those in the Mazda CX-9, but with two major differences. The Chevy has a power liftgate and remote start, features that Asian-label crossovers are only just beginning to include. Nevertheless, if you get crazy with the options sheet, the Traverse 2LT with navigation becomes a $40,000 vehicle. Oh, and you want leather-trimmed first- and second-row seats? You're quickly on your way to our test vehicle's price of $42,880.
In a way, the Traverse also has a similar powertrain to the CX-9. The single-exhaust 3.6-liter V-6 makes 281 hp and 266 lb-ft of torque, and it works through a six-speed automatic to deliver 16 mpg city/23 mpg highway. It also feels a bit dated in its performance, just like the Mazda V-6. That said, it has enough power to coax this 4956-pound dreadnought out of the harbor, and the six-speed automatic transmission changes gears quietly and smoothly. Even so, we're not sure that the package is up to carrying everything you need for a full summer vacation at the lake, even with its tow rating of 5200 pounds.
Both the 2013 Traverse and the 2013 CX-9 have nicely appointed interiors, with comfortable seats, good materials, and fine build quality. The cabins feel much different, however. The CX-9 feels like a sports car that's been pumped up like a balloon to become a passenger vehicle, whereas the Traverse feels exactly how you'd expect a three-row crossover to feel. There's enough natural light coming in the windows to make all three rows feel spacious, and you're never squeezed into a seat that's in desperate need of more elbow room -- plus there's cargo space besides.
Do Sales Matter?
The Chevrolet Traverse also walks all over the CX-9 in the popular vote. Consider that Chevrolet sold almost 200,000 examples of the Traverse in 2011 and 2012 combined, while Mazda sold only a third as many CX-9s in the same time period.
Despite the fact that the 2013 Chevrolet Traverse excels over the 2013 Mazda CX-9 in so many practical categories that relate to utility and comfort, the Mazda has a performance margin over the Traverse in every dynamic respect. We've found that driving makes a difference not only in safe maneuverability around town but also secure maneuverability in those remote places where vacation travel takes you. It's this factor, which is all-important to Automobile Magazine, that makes the Mazda CX-9 the winner in this match-up. -- Christopher Nelson
Winner: 2013 Mazda CX-9

2013 Nissan Pathfinder vs. 2013 Toyota Highlander

2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum 4WD
2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum 4WD Vs 2013 Toyota Highlander Limited V6 Front View
The Nissan Pathfinder has been like an aging rock star struggling for relevance. One of the progenitors of the SUV craze, it fell to the wayside as the segment evolved. But now the all-new 2013 Nissan Pathfinder has found itself some new managers and is aiming for the top of the charts.
Much like the opening lines of a catchy pop song, the Pathfinder's styling is at once fresh and a little familiar. A flowing Coke-bottle shape clearly communicates that this is now a unibody, carlike crossover rather than a body-on-frame truck. Nissan designers also resisted their weirder impulses (reference the Cube, Juke, and Murano CrossCabriolet) and instead went for what one of us describes as "proportional and clean" and another thinks is "anonymously attractive."
Living the Crossover Life
The interior likewise aims for the segment's sweet spot. First- and second-row passengers have acres of space. The third row feels more hospitable than the specifications (30.7 inches of legroom) would suggest. "The optional moonroof helps brighten things back there," notes deputy editor Joe DeMatio.
Nissan is more adventurous with interior materials than most mainstream brands. Berber-weave floor mats and a nicely grained, almond-color dash warm up the cabin and further distance this crossover from its SUV forerunner. It's also worth noting that the materials are mostly the same hard plastics that we knock in competitors like the Toyota Highlander; Nissan's designers deserve credit for figuring out how to work with the cheap stuff in an impressive way. At $44,395, you pay for such details, of course.
Power with Responsibility
We thought Nissan's notoriously noisy 3.5-liter V-6 and a continuously variable transmission (CVT) would be a match made in hell. In fact, the engine and transmission get along reasonably well. The V-6's growl signifies 260 hp and 240 lb-ft of torque, and it sounds infinitely better than the buzzy four-cylinders we typically associate with CVTs. It's hard to argue with the results, since the Pathfinder's fuel-economy rating of 19 mpg city/25 mpg highway edges out the rest of the pack. "Pretty impressive for a large, four-wheel-drive crossover," notes DeMatio.
In driving environments representative of the typical crossover experience -- say on the freeway or in the parking lot at Chuck E. Cheese -- we enjoyed the Pathfinder's linear steering and comfortable ride. Even so, the 4471-pound crossover had a tough time hiding its size when pushed in corners.
Some of our more aged, tenured editors wistfully recalled what a sensation the original Nissan Pathfinder had been in the 1990s, when its snappy made-in-America design set it apart from mainstream trucks. Today's 2013 Nissan Pathfinder, like most of the pop songs on the radio in this new century, is polished and professional, if not particularly memorable. Yet, just as teens no longer line up to listen to rockabilly, most American families no longer want to drive around the suburbs in a truck. - David Zenlea
2013 Toyota Highlander Limited V6
2013 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum 4WD Vs 2013 Toyota Highlander Limited V6 Rear View
The 2013 Toyota Highlander is in many respects the grand dame of this segment. Toyota started offering a third row in the Highlander back in 2004 to make it an alternative to minivans and bulky, full-size SUVs. The second-generation model introduced in 2008 remains a strong seller that we simply can't ignore, even though an all-new version (based on the Camry, just as here) is on the horizon. Yet the opportunity to drive the 2013 Highlander back-to-back with its newer competitors provides evidence of the way this segment has evolved.
The most notable shift is in size. The Highlander finds itself on the small end of this group, more like a mid-size crossover with bonus seats in back than a dedicated three-row vehicle. (It's still a bit bigger than other 'tweeners like the three-row Kia Sorento and Mitsubishi Outlander.) Toyota makes up some ground with smart packaging. The second-row center seat, for instance, folds neatly into the front center armrest. Still, the Highlander's third row seats were more cramped than those of any other vehicle in this group.
No Offense
The 2013 Highlander also betrays its age with its austere styling. There's nothing offensive about the Highlander's sheetmetal, but neither is there anything interesting. The interior proves versatile when it comes to utility, but it's trimmed throughout with rental-car plastics, which is noticeable in a vehicle priced at $41,855. "Toyota needs to get its act together in terms of interior quality," notes road test editor Christopher Nelson. That said, some appreciated the Highlander's minimalism. "I like the slim A-pillars, the shallow dash, and the ability to sense the front of the vehicle," says deputy editor Joe DeMatio.
The Highlander's hallmark remains its hassle-free driving experience. Although all the crossovers we tested drive like cars, the 2013 Highlander convinces you it really is a car. Credit the Camry-derived underpinnings and a silky smooth, 270-hp V-6 that gets 17 mpg city/22 mpg highway. Mind you, we're not talking about a very interesting or sporty car. The 4464-pound Highlander features the same flaccid steering and soupy handling that knocked the Camry out of contention in our recent comparison test of mid-size cars. There are, no doubt, plenty of buyers who desire an effortless, isolated driving experience, but they don't read Automobile Magazine.
Some Respect, Please
Even if we don't love the 2013 Toyota Highlander, we left this test with a healthy respect for it. "As old as this crossover is, it's still quite good," concludes DeMatio. Yet among this group of new and recently updated models, that's not quite good enough. An all-new, significantly larger Toyota Highlander debuts later this year. If it can build on the strengths of the outgoing car, Toyota should again have a formidable contender. For now it will have to settle for an honorable first-round exit. - David Zenlea
Winner: 2013 Nissan Pathfinder
8 Crossovers Comparison Front View 2
When summer arrives, America hits the road. There's something about this country that calls out to all of us, so we yearn to go and see for ourselves. Sometimes it's Yellowstone National Park in the Rocky Mountains and sometimes it's the World's Largest Ball of Twine in Cawker City, Kansas, and as Americans we embrace both with cheerful enthusiasm. When the weather turns warm, we're all about the road map, the road trip, and road food.
Best of all, it's no longer necessary to drive Clark Griswold's infamous Wagon Queen Family Truckster to get there, as in National Lampoon's Vacation (1983). Instead we have the three-row family crossover, a miracle of packaging efficiency, thoughtful convenience, and comfortable transportation.
It's not fashionable among car people to pay tribute to the crossover, but we're smart enough to understand that Americans have figured out what you need to cross the wide-open spaces of this country on all kinds of roads and in all kinds of weather. It turns out that an all-wheel-drive utility vehicle with the easy-going personality of a family sedan is exactly what you want.
That's what has led us to compare the eight best three-row family crossovers that you can buy right now: 2013 Chevrolet Traverse; 2013 Dodge Durango; 2013 Ford Explorer; 2013 Honda Pilot; 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe; 2013 Mazda CX-9; 2013 Nissan Pathfinder; and 2013 Toyota Highlander.
Crossovers, Automobile-style
We began with the full range of family-style crossovers, which we define as mid-size vehicles intended primarily for passenger use but also capable of weekend adventure. That includes the ability to pack a useful amount of stuff and perhaps do some light-duty towing as well.
We have chosen eight finalists that represent the best aspects of the category, whether it's packaging efficiency or simple drivability. By choosing one of them as the best, we hope not only to define the current state of the American family crossover but also the character that the people who read Automobile want in a practical, everyday kind of family vehicle.
We have specified the ability to carry three rows of passengers, and while we acknowledge that for most people this feature is useful only a limited number of times each year, it's always a consideration in the buying process. We have specified all-wheel drive because it snows in the mountains, rains in the woods, and can be muddy almost anywhere. Our selection of vehicles also includes only what is on sale today, since people are buying what's on sale today, not next fall.
Crossovers, Bracket-style
We can't pretend to be the average buyer because, well, that would be impossible. Just like you, we are who we are. If you want complete objectivity unconfused by education, enthusiasm, experience, and just plain good taste, well, good luck to you.
8 Crossovers Comparison Front View 2
Also, we've again based our test on bracket-style, head-to-head comparisons between vehicles, just as we did with our comparison of mid-size sedans. We're not going to dumb down the comparison process into some kind of SAT test, where like geeks we carefully add up the points scored in a thousand little categories of performance. When you do that, you reward broad-based mediocrity, not excellence. And at Automobile, we're all about excellence.
The question of choice is personal and powerful, and we think that a one-to-one confrontation between vehicles reveals character in a way that giant test groups do not.
The Clark Griswold Factor
Every family must have a place to go, and our destination was the Tulip Festival in Holland, Michigan. Every May, 500,000 people make the drive to this eight-day celebration, which began in 1929 with a suggestion by a local schoolteacher to beautify this town on the shore of Lake Michigan by planting tulips in honor of the original Dutch settlers. Some 6 million tulips bloom in town each spring.
There are three parades, professional entertainment, fireworks, and dancers in wooden shoes (wear six to eight pair of socks before you try it). We stayed in the Euro-style CityFlats Hotel, looked at tulips, ate the heavy Dutch food, saw Big Red (the lighthouse at the harbor's entrance), and drove by the eighteenth-century Dutch windmill. Sadly, we missed the wooden shoe factory and the place where they do Delft dinnerware. The locals are so nice that they even shut down part of Kollen Park to let us take souvenir pictures. It was great.
Best of all, we made it a road trip. We set our own schedule, played our own music, found our own roads, and leaned out the windows and barked at the cows if we wanted to. We stopped for lunch at Bell's Brewery Eccentric Café in Kalamazoo (perfect for us, eh?). In addition, there were no airports involved at any point during our adventure, which is always a blessing.
The Road Map
Just like any road trip, it will take a while before you reach your destination.
We begin the trip today by selecting the vehicles for our comparison: 2013 Chevrolet Traverse; 2013 Dodge Durango; 2013 Ford Explorer; 2013 Honda Pilot; 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe; 2013 Mazda CX-9; 2013 Nissan Pathfinder; and 2013 Toyota Highlander.
Tomorrow and the next day, there will be head-to-head comparisons between the vehicles, with four vehicles involved each day. The day after that we'll sum up some of what we've learned during our tests, which include a rodeo-style timed test of third-seat stowage and a very messy lunch at our local Sonic drive-in. The last day, we'll stage the final head-to-head comparison and determine the winner.
You might want to start preparing the plans for your own summer vacation right now.
2013 Nissan Pathfinder Front Right View 5
To know one's self, observed Benjamin Franklin, is sufficiently hard as steel and diamonds. It seems that buyers of the Nissan Pathfinder found self-awareness especially challenging. They fancied themselves as rugged outdoorspeople, towing 7000-lb boats, and crawling across the boulder-lined trails of Moab.
In reality, all their Pathfinders did was shuttle kids from home to school and back. And in the SUV-frenzied days of cheap gas and disregard for our planet's resources (and for our own money), Nissan humored these customers, twice switching the Pathfinder between body-on-frame and unibody construction to best serve their imaginary needs.
For the fourth-generation Pathfinder, Nissan is finally serving its own needs -- the need to sell 100,000 units a year, just like the Honda Pilot, Toyota Highlander, and Ford Explorer all do. Those crossovers each sell more than three times as much as Nissan's current Pathfinder. Clearly, while some customers may want to pretend they're out on the Rubicon, in these more pragmatic economic times, they're increasingly unwilling to put up with the drawbacks of a body-on-frame SUV: heavy weight, inefficient space utilization, lack of ride refinement, and of course, miserable fuel economy.
To that end, the 2013 Pathfinder becomes a real player in the three-row, soccer-mom, crossover segment. It switches back to a unibody, this time with a transverse-mounted V-6, front-wheel drive, and a continuously variable transmission. Of course all-wheel drive is available, but there is neither a V-8 nor locking low-range diffs. No need to pretend.
The Pathfinder shares its basic platform with the Infiniti JX, which means the V-6 is a 3.5-liter VQ-series, mated to a new chain-driven CVT that Nissan says is strong enough to cope with 5000 pounds of towing duty. Given how easily our front-wheel drive tester would squeal its tires off the line, we'd recommend all-wheel drive for towing -- not that we expect to see too many Pathfinders with a boat hitched to the back.
The all-wheel drive system is fully switchable, meaning drivers can select between front-wheel drive, automatic four-wheel drive (which sends power rearward in response to front wheel slip), or 4x4 lock, which keeps a constant 50/50 split. We'd much rather see a computer-controlled system that requires no intervention from the driver and can engage the rear wheels before slip occurs.
That system would be more appropriate for a mommy-mobile, a role that the Pathfinder performs quite well. The CVT's programming keeps the coarse VQ in its sub-3000-rpm quiet zone at all kid-friendly levels of acceleration. At full thrust, the transmission makes the best of all 260 hp, pegging the tachometer needle satisfyingly into the red zone. With a curb weight as low as 4150 pounds, the Pathfinder is quick once it's up to speed, though sudden requests for power at highway speeds are met with an unacceptably long pause before speed starts gathering.
Nissan claims best-in-class fuel economy (20/26 for front-wheel-drive versions, 19/25 for all-wheel drive), a 30 percent improvement over the previous Pathfinder. That's despite the fact that the new vehicle is 4.6 inches longer, 4.3 inches wider, and offers an additional 8.4 cubic feet of interior space. In place of the off-road credentials is a focus on family usability. The second-row seats are mounted uncommonly high, but still offer vast headroom -- and they slide well out of the way for easy ingress to the rear. And the third-row is surprisingly roomy and comfortable.
The driver's seat is likely the best seat in the Pathfinder, since those who sit in it command an exquisitely communicative electro-hydraulic steering system (which boasts a big Renault logo on its fluid reservoir). Front-wheel-drive Pathfinders suffer from considerable torque steer, however, so you'll have to hang on tight. Between the highly legible, clear gauges is the forward-leaning LCD display we first saw in the 2013 Altima, which here, too, lacks an "off" mode or a blank screen option.
The Pathfinder also suffers from slightly too-small rear-view mirrors that we couldn't seem to adjust to eliminate a car-sized blind spot. No blind-spot monitoring system is available, nor are HID headlights or any of Nissan's other active safety aids -- but the dual-zone climate control system is quiet and effective, even in 110-degree heat. And speaking of 110, the cabin is devoid of excess wind noise even at 110 mph.
Not that Pathfinder drivers typically drive at such speeds. But perhaps knowing that they can do so -- in comfort -- will be enough to sway those final few that mommies insistent upon Moab off-road credentials. If they had just admitted years ago that all they wanted was a butch-looking minivan with four-wheel drive to get them home in the snow, perhaps we'd have had a great Pathfinder like this all along.
2013 Nissan Pathfinder
2013 Nissan Pathfinder

New For 2013

The 2013 Pathfinder is totally new and shares its platform with the 2013 Infiniti JX35.

Overview

The Nissan Pathfinder is all-new for 2013. The three-row SUV has abandoned its old-fashioned truck frame in favor of unibody construction, which helps save weight for improved fuel economy. That transition nets a well-deserved face lift, too, as graceful curves, chrome, and creased body panels take the place of the previous square, boxy design. The second-row seats have two neat tricks: First, EZ Flex allows the second-row 60/40-split seats to slide forward 5.5 inches so people can access the third row from either side of the car. Second, the Latch and Glide feature means a child seat can remain safely attached to a second-row seat while it is tilted for access to the third row. The interior is home to smarter and higher-quality materials. The options list includes new gadgets like an eight-inch touch screen, push-button start, remote engine starting, a dual-pane sunroof, dual-screen rear DVD players, and Nissan’s Around View monitor 360-degree parking cameras. The lone powertrain choice is a 3.5-liter V-6 and an updated continuously variable transmission. Front- and four-wheel-drive configurations are available, and the Pathfinder can tow up to 5000 pounds. Fuel economy is much improved compared with the old Pathfinder. The new SUV can get up to 26 mpg on the highway.

Safety

Front, front side, and curtain air bags; stability and traction control; and ABS are standard.

You'll like:

  • Modern, upscale design
  • Improved fuel economy
  • Roomy interior

You won't like:

  • Lacks advanced safety technology
  • Droning engine note

Key Competitors For The 2013 Nissan Pathfinder

  • Chevrolet Traverse
  • Ford Explorer
  • Honda Pilot
  • Toyota Highlander

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Certified Pre-Owned 2013 Nissan Pathfinder Pricing

Certified Pre Owned Price
$22,900

Used 2013 Nissan Pathfinder Values / Pricing

Suggested Retail Price
$28,650

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2013 Nissan Pathfinder
2013 Nissan Pathfinder
S FWD 4-Dr Sport Utility V6
20 MPG City | 26 MPG Hwy
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2013 Nissan Pathfinder
2013 Nissan Pathfinder
S FWD 4-Dr Sport Utility V6
$28,650
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2013 Nissan Pathfinder
2013 Nissan Pathfinder
S FWD 4-Dr Sport Utility V6
260hp
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2013 Nissan Pathfinder Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
3.5L V6Engine
Fuel economy City:
20 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
26 MPG
Horsepower:
260 hp @ 6400rpm
Torque:
240 ft lb of torque @ 4400rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats (optional)
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player (optional)
  • CD Changer
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation (optional)
Vehicle
36,000 miles / 36 months
Powertrain
60,000 miles / 60 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 60 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:30
Component
AIR BAGS
Summary
Nissan is recalling certain model year 2013 Altima, LEAF, Pathfinder, Sentra, and Infiniti JX35 vehicles. Sensors within the passenger Occupant Detection System (ODS) may have been manufactured out of specification. This may cause the system to malfunction and permanently suppress the passenger airbag.
Consequences
If the vehicle is involved in a crash necessitating airbag deployment and the passenger airbag is suppressed, there may be an increased risk of personal injury.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the ODS sensors and replace them as neccessary, free of charge. The recall began on May 6, 2013. Owners may contact Nissan Customer Service at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
82,038
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:30
Component
SERVICE BRAKES
Summary
Nissan is recalling certain model year 2013 Pathfinder and Infiniti JX vehicles manufactured December 3, 2012, through January 29, 2013. The front brake torque member was improperly cast resulting in structural weakness. This can lead to premature failure and cracking.
Consequences
If the brake torque member fails, the brake caliper may move and contact the inside of the road wheel, resulting in reduced braking, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the manufacturing date of the torque members and replace them, as necessary, free of charge. The recall began on May 20, 2013. Owners may contact Nissan Customer Service at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
19,258
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:31
Component
SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC:ANTILOCK
Summary
Nissan is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Nissan Pathfinder vehicles manufactured April 18, 2012, through September 20, 2013; model year 2013 Infiniti JX35 vehicles manufactured September 15, 2011, through January 16, 2013; and model year 2014 Infiniti QX60 vehicles manufactured January 17, 2013, through September 20, 2013. In the affected vehicles, during light braking on rough roads, the antilock brake system (ABS) brake pressure output software may lead to an increase in stopping distance.
Consequences
The increased stopping distance may increase the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will reprogram the ABS, free of charge. The recall began on November 18, 2013. Owners may contact Nissan at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
151,695
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:31
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: SOFTWARE
Summary
Nissan is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Nissan Pathfinder vehicles manufactured April 18, 2012, through September 20, 2013; model year 2013 Infiniti JX35 vehicles manufactured September 15, 2011, through January 16, 2013; and model year 2014 Infiniti QX60 vehicles manufactured January 17, 2013, through September 20, 2013. In the affected vehicles, during light braking on rough roads, the antilock brake system (ABS) brake pressure output software may lead to an increase in stopping distance.
Consequences
The increased stopping distance may increase the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will reprogram the ABS, free of charge. The recall began on November 18, 2013. Owners may contact Nissan at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
151,695
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
AIR BAGS:FRONTAL
Summary
Nissan North America, Inc. (Nissan) is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Altima, LEAF, Pathfinder, and Sentra, model year 2013 NV200 (aka Taxi) and Infiniti JX35 and model year 2014 Infiniti Q50 and QX60 vehicles. In the affected vehicles, the occupant classification system (OCS) software may incorrectly classify the passenger seat as empty, when it is occupied by an adult.
Consequences
If the OCS does not detect an adult occupant in the passenger seat, the passenger airbag would be deactivated. Failure of the passenger airbag to deploy during a crash (where deployment is warranted) could increase the risk of injury to the passenger.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will update the OCS software, free of charge. The recall began on April 14, 2014. Owners may contact Nissan at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
989,701
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: SOFTWARE
Summary
Nissan North America, Inc. (Nissan) is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Altima, LEAF, Pathfinder, and Sentra, model year 2013 NV200 (aka Taxi) and Infiniti JX35 and model year 2014 Infiniti Q50 and QX60 vehicles. In the affected vehicles, the occupant classification system (OCS) software may incorrectly classify the passenger seat as empty, when it is occupied by an adult.
Consequences
If the OCS does not detect an adult occupant in the passenger seat, the passenger airbag would be deactivated. Failure of the passenger airbag to deploy during a crash (where deployment is warranted) could increase the risk of injury to the passenger.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will update the OCS software, free of charge. The recall began on April 14, 2014. Owners may contact Nissan at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
989,701
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
POWER TRAIN:AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION:COOLING UNIT AND LINES
Summary
Nissan North America (Nissan) is recalling certain model year 2013 Pathfinder vehicles manufactured April 18, 2012, through October 3, 2012, and equipped with a continuously variable transmission (CVT). In the affected vehicles, the internal oil cooler (ITOC) hose may detach from the cooler due to inadequate clamping force, allowing transmission fluid to leak.
Consequences
The loss of transmission fluid could cause the transmission to function improperly and the vehicle to stop accelerating, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will install an oil hose repair kit, free of charge. The recall began on May 12, 2014. Owners may contact Nissan at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
3,065
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
STRUCTURE:BODY:HOOD:HINGE AND ATTACHMENTS
Summary
Nissan North America, Inc. (Nissan) is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Nissan Pathfinder vehicles manufactured June 20, 2012, to November 18, 2013, 2014 Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid vehicles manufactured July 18, 2013, to November 18, 2013, 2013 Infiniti JX35 vehicles manufactured November 29, 2011, to June 14, 2013, and 2014 QX60 vehicles manufactured May 16, 2013, to November 18, 2013, and 2014 Infiniti QX60 Hybrid vehicles manufactured July 18, 2013, to November 18, 2013. In the affected vehicles the hood release cable assembly may have been installed incorrectly preventing the latching claw from fully engaging. The secondary latch may remain in the open position when the hood is closed.
Consequences
If the primary hood latch is released and the secondary latch fails during operation of the vehicle, it could cause the hood to open during vehicle operation impairing the driver's vision, increasing the risk of a vehicle crash.
Remedy
Nissan will notify owners, and dealers will modify the angle of the hood release mechanism to provide additional length to the release cable, free of charge. The recall began on March 9, 2015. Owners may contact Nissan customer service at 1-800-647-7261.
Potential Units Affected
170,665
Notes
Nissan North America, Inc.


IIHS Front Small Overlap
N/R
NHTSA Rating Front Driver
5
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
3
NHTSA Rating Front Side
5
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
5
NHTSA Rating Overall
4
NHTSA Rating Rollover
4
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
Good
IIHS Overall Side Crash
Good
IIHS Rear Crash
N/R
IIHS Roof Strength
N/R

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2013 Nissan Pathfinder

Depreciation
28%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$9,820
28%
Insurance
$6,790
19.3%
Fuel Cost
$11,239
32%
Financing
$2,607
7.4%
Maintenance
$3,191
9.1%
Repair Costs
$1,068
3%
State Fees
$410
1.2%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $35,125 What's This?
Value Rating: Above Average