Auctions

Seven Favorite Cars from RM Sotheby’s Eclectic 2016 Duemila Ruote Sale

The most wildly varied auction we’ve ever seen

While we were recovering from Thanksgiving’s turkey coma, RM Sotheby’s was hard at work at its 2016 Duemila Ruote sale, where a whopping 423 cars were sold between November 25 and 27. This was one of the most eclectic catalogues ever put together, ranging from low-dollar 1980s Alfa Romeos to blue chip collectables like the Porsche 959. Here are our standout picks from the sale.

1951 Lancia Aurelia B20 – $388,000

Before the ravages of the 1990s and 2000s, Lancia was a well-respected innovator in rally and motorsports. This rang especially true in the 1950s, when Lancia rolled out the first production V-6 engine in the popular Aurelia. No info is given for this 1951 example, but given its period-correct competition number, stripped exterior, and high sale price, it likely has some motorsports history under its belt.

1993 Porsche 968 Club Sport – $77,000

Here’s some delicious forbidden fruit for us Yanks. This Club Sport is a track-ready variant of the front-engine 968, the final front-engined “entry-level” sports car from Porsche. In typical Porsche fashion, this track-prep means the car does away with a whole heap of interior niceties. Accouterments like the electric windows, radio, air conditioning, airbags, and heavy electric seats were ripped out in favor of wind-up windows and manual Recaro racing seats. Along with the diet, the Club Sport rode on wider (and stickier) tires and a stiffer suspension.

1987 Alfa Romeo 75 Corse – $59,000

Here’s another mystery Italian. RM Sotheby’s didn’t provide much info on this Alfa 75, but a shot of the ID plaque confirms this is one of the 75s prepared by Alfa Corse, the Italian automaker’s in-house competition branch. This car appears ready for historical racing events, but would be just as good at putting down laps as one of the coolest track-day toys around.

1978 Maserati Kyalami – $89,000

Never heard of the Maserati Kyalami? We don’t blame you this is one of Maserati’s rarest cars from the 1970s and 1980s. Essentially, it’s Maserati’s 2 + 2 grand tourer of that era, packing big meaty V-8 power under the front hood, and thick leather seats on the inside. A 4.9-liter four-cam V-8 sent 286 hp to the rear wheels, giving the Kyalami strong contemporary performance. Just 210 were built between 1976 and 1983.

1983 BMW 635 CSi ETCC Group A – $172,000

 Again, no model history was provided for this car, but judging by the name and the level of race preparation, it’s safe to say this E24 BMW 635 was used in the European Touring Car Championship. After being snapped up for a decent price, we’re sure it’s days on the track aren’t over.

1994 Bugatti EB110 GT – $650,000 

Before the Chiron, Veyron, and even before VW bought the French nameplate, there was the EB110, the first modern supercar to wear the vaunted Bugatti badge. The spec sheet was impressive; power came from a 3.5-liter quad-turbocharged V-12 engine developed in-house, sending 552 hp to all-four wheels through a six-speed manual transmission. Performance was stellar, with a 0-60 mph time arriving in the mid three-second range and a top speed of 213 mph. According to RM Sotheby’s, just 139 were produced.

1970 Lancia Super Jolly – $65,000

It’s not a sleek as the aforementioned EB110 or as race-ready as the Alfa Romeo 75 Corse, but this 1970 Lancia Jolly sure is handy. We’re not sure on what the machine mounted on the center of the bed is, but it appears to be a tool for removing and mounting tires onto wheels. It also looks removable, so this flatbed can turn into the perfect trackday rig.

Photos of Porsche, Lancia Super Jolly, Alfa Romeo, Maserati, and BMW are by Tom Wood, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s. Photos of Bugatti and Lancia Aurelia are by Tim Scott, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

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