Lamborghini Miura Celebrates 50th Birthday, "Italian Job" Style

Looking back on an automotive legend

This year marks the 50th birthday of the Miura, and to celebrate the occasion, Lamborghini pulled two Miuras from its museum in Italy and took them on a road trip of a lifetime.

The sports cars retraced the route shown in the opening sequence of "The Italian Job." The journey recreated the opening scene from the 1969 cult film, which featured the Miura traveling up the hairpin curves of the Italian Alps. (We can only assume the Miura didn't face a destructive end this time around). Police helped escort the Miuras up to the Great St. Bernard Pass, which is usually closed but was opened on a one-time basis for this event.

On hand to witness the feat were the "fathers" of the Lamborghini Miura. These included Gian Paolo Dallara and Paolo Stanzani, two engineers who worked on the Miura. Marcello Gandini, who designed the Miura, was also at the celebration.

Introduced in 1966, the Miura helped popularize the concept of a mid-engine sports car. It boasted a 4.0-liter V-12 engine, as well as striking good looks. The model was produced in limited numbers between 1966 and 1972, until it was replaced by the Countach.

 

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