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Just Listed: 1999 Honda Civic Si

Clean, wholesome fun

You don’t need Hellcat power levels to have fun on four wheels. As long as you keep it simple, clean, and light, any reasonably sporty car can turn a grocery run into a blast. Bring a Trailer’s clean 1999 Honda Civic Si is a great place to start, especially considering the condition.

This is an EM1 Si, a sport compact considered by many to be one of the finest cars produced during Honda’s golden era. Don’t think about it too hard—there’s not much to the formula. It’s as light as it looks, tipping the scales at an impressive 2,612 pounds.

This bulk (or lack thereof) is pulled around by a 1.6-liter naturally aspirated B16A2 four-cylinder, sending 160 hp and 111 lb-ft of torque to the front wheels through a five-speed manual transmission. Performance was great for the time, returning a 0-60 run of just 7.1 seconds. This, combined with an 8,000-rpm redline and snappy chassis caused the EM1 to amass many fans during its short two-year production span.

This particular EM1 is in shockingly good condition, bucking the trend of dirty, ratty, used-up 1990s Hondas we’re forced to wade through on Craigslist. The Si was sold new in California and remained with the original owner until last month. Despite residing for a spell in Illinois and Michigan, the car was kept out of the snow, so it appears to be rust free.

Aside from stiff Neuspeed springs and adjustable front control arms, it’s blissfully stock, right down to the factory airbox. Inside, it’s as sharp as the exterior, with correct seats and center dash stack. The car is reportedly in tip-top running condition, aside from some worn tires. Mileage is low, right around the 97,000 mark.

Like so many Japanese cars from this era, there are not many of these left in this condition. Head over to Bring a Trailer to submit a bid before it’s gone.

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