2019 Mercedes-AMG GT 4-Door Coupe Arrives at Last

Affalterbach unleashes its latest four-door beast

The new Mercedes-AMG GT 4-Door Coupe may be based on the third-generation CLS-Class, but it is also one of 60 bespoke AMG models and a nonconformist piece of kit altogether.

“For the first time, we transferred the AMG design DNA to a four-door model,” says Mercedes-AMG chief designer Volker Hellwig, proudly pointing at an early concept. “Characteristic elements include multibeam headlamps, a shark nose front end, a so-called jet wing front apron, slimline LED taillights and low-drag wheels. Completely new is the tapered greenhouse which sports a sleek and low roofline and large rear doors for easy entry and exit.”

Three variants of the four-door AMG GT will be offered at launch, all equipped with the nine-speed Speedshift multi-clutch automatic, starting with the six-cylinder GT 53. It is powered by Mercedes’ new 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six, rated at 429 hp and 384 lb-ft of torque, not counting the 21 hp and 184 lb-ft of torque added on demand by the EQ Boost 48-volt hybrid assist system. AMG claims a 0-60 mph time of 4.4 seconds and a 174 mph top speed.

Next is the GT 63, which receives a version of AMG’s 4.0-liter twin-turbo V-8 making 577 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. It can hit 60 mph in just 3.3 seconds before topping out at 193 mph. In case that’s not enough, there’s the GT 63 S, which receives another 73 hp and 74 lb of torque. The combination of 630 hp and 627 lb-ft of torque shaves 0.2-second off the 0-60 time and slightly ups the top speed to 195 mph. It’s a hefty beast, though, weighing in at around 4,500 pounds

Should the market want it or legislation command it, Mercedes can relatively quickly pull a 3.0-liter plug-in hybrid model out of the bag. This configuration combines the 429-hp inline six with the aforementioned 48-volt hybrid system and an electric power module which adds 201 hp to the tally. In total, that’s over 600 hp and over 660 lb-ft of torque, not to mention a highly useful electric-only range of 60 miles.

On-demand AWD with four-wheel torque vectoring is part of the package for all, as are variable-rate power-steering, a limited-slip differential, and for the 63 and 63 S only, the increasingly popular rear-wheel steering and available carbon-ceramic brakes. The AMG GT 63 and 63 S also employ an adjustable triple-chamber air suspension while the GT 53 makes do with steel springs mated to electronically controlled dampers.

“The GT can be any car you like—a butch prowler painted matte black with matching night pack and dark rims or a super-sleek boulevard cruiser with chrome accents and the body sprayed in a friendly color,” says Hellwig. “The GT has its own wide-track front suspension as well as restyled front wings, sills and wheels, not to mention our trademark Panamericana grille.”

Beyond the grille, the AMG GT 4-Door Coupe also fields an adjustable air panel in the low-flying front bumper, a multi-stage pop-up rear spoiler and a prominent rear diffuser, as well as fully functional air curtains for the front wheels.

The 20219 AMG GT 4-Door Coupe will be more expensive than the 2019 CLS-Class, which in turn will cost about $10,000 more than the E-Class, so figure around $100,000 for the AMG GT 53, $125,000 for the AMG GT 63 S, and somewhere in the middle for the GT 63. The V-8 variants arrive in the U.S. in early 2019 (GT 63 / GT 63 S), mid-2019 for the AMG GT 53.