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2018 Land Rover Discovery Tows 121-Ton Road Train Down Under

Watch an unmodified Disco’s epic 9.9-mile pull

Don’t try this at home—it’ll probably void your truck’s warranty or you’ll end up in a “hold my beer” video on YouTube.

A stock 2018 Land Rover Discovery HSE Td6 pulled a 121-ton road train for 9.9-miles in the Australian Outback to show off its towing badassery.

The Discovery Td6 has a normal towing capacity of 7,716 pounds, but it still managed to tow a fully loaded road train thanks to its 3.0-liter turbocharged diesel V-6 engine with 254 horsepower and 443 lb-ft of torque. The engine is mated to an 8-speed automatic transmission with four-wheel-drive.

“When Land Rover first got in touch, I didn’t think the vehicle would be able to do it, so I was amazed by how easily the standard Discovery pulled a [121-ton] road train. And the smoothness of the gear changes under that amount of load was genuinely impressive,”
said John Bilato, G&S Transport driver, in a statement.

If you recall, the original Discovery was used to pull a train back in 1989 for a similar stunt and last year a Discovery Sport towed a trio of rail carriages 85-feet above the Rhine River.

“Towing capability has always been an important part of Discovery DNA and the raw weight of the road train tells only half the story here,” said Quentin Spottiswoode, Land Rover product engineer.

“Pulling a rig and seven trailers, with the rolling resistance of so many axles to overcome, is a huge achievement. We expected the vehicle to do well but it passed this test with flying colors, hitting 27 mph along its 10-mile route.”

The Disco was hooked up to the road train using a factory-fitted optional tow bar attachment for its epic ride. Watch the impressive video here.

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