Features

Ford GT, Lamborghini Murcilago, Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, and Porsche Carrera GT Photo Gallery

The Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, ready for takeoff.

The cruises a wet country road. We’d later find that the door cut-outs into the roof leak a stream of water onto your lap.

Pulling open the barn door reveals four supercars in the disappearing twilight. Determined crowds of onlookers had to be beaten back with a stick.

Don Sherman explores the outer limits of oversteer in the Carrera GT. The Porsche readily flicked its tail out.

A determined shove of the right foot can send the Ford GT‘s rear end around, but it takes greater intent than in the Carrera GT.

Despite its all-wheel drive, the Murcilago could be coaxed into an oversteering attitude.

This nighttime fill-up on the Virginia/North Carolina border would soon devolve into a major happening, with locals’ pickups blocking us in from all sides.

The Porsche and the Lamborghini enjoy an empty road near Virginia International Raceway.

Jean Jennings makes some notes in the Ford GT, with Don Sherman (left) and Mark Gillies (right), during a brief moment in the VIR parking lot when the GT was not swamped by race fans.

Carrera GT arrived (via truck) with a stone-dead battery. Jump-starting presented a challenge, as the release for the engine cover is battery-powered. There was no owners manual, so no clues there. Eventually, we learned the secret: remove the fuse box cover, pull down an electrical connection, apply 12 volts of power, thereby supplying enough juice to open the rear hood and the front trunk lid.

Chevrolet‘s finest attempts to breathe life into Porsche’s finest. To no avail. The jumper cables were eventually identified as the weak link in the operation. Ultimately the Carrera GT was jumped by the semi truck, using a new set of jumper cables.

An attempted push start of the Carrera GT comes to nothing. Even after we finally do get it started, and it’s been running for over an hour, the battery was not sufficiently charged to start the engine, and we had to push start the car a few more times (successfully, at least).

A turn behind the wheel of the Carrera GT is a sure smile-maker.

Why you never buy a used press car, Part I: Pure hooliganism in the Murcilago.

Why you never buy a used press car, Part II: The SLR undergoes important “testing.”

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Buying Guide

2011 Lamborghini Murcielago

MSRP $416,300 LP670-4 SuperVeloce Coupe
Motor Trend Rating
StarStarStarStarStarHalf-Star

EPA MPG:

9 City / 14 Hwy

Horse Power:

650 @ 8000

Torque:

487 @ 6000