2014 MINI Cooper

Base FWD 2-Dr Convertible I4 man trans

2014 mini cooper Reviews and News

2014 Mini Cooper Front Three Quarters View In Motion On Coastline

Note: this review focuses on the new 2014 Mini Cooper. For our drive impressions of the new 2014 Mini Cooper S, please Click Here to read our first drive review.

You wouldn’t suspect it by the forced merriment in which Mini wraps itself -- more so than ever with the latest version -- but the third iteration of Mini-by-BMW has grown up. The more grown-up Mini no longer cuts the same dashing figure it once did, but it’s significantly more pleasant to spend time with.
As one journeys further into adulthood, extra pounds and inches are harder to avoid. Friends and acquaintances retain their same physical features, but the proportions are a little off. So it is with the new Mini. Certainly, the design has been ever so carefully evolved to maintain the now-iconic look. All the key elements are present and accounted for: the large round headlights, the hexagonal grille, the upright taillamps, the floating roof. But they have been applied to a body that has morphed into something noticeably different than the first of the new Minis, which debuted back in 2002.

Extra inches

This latest generation sees its overall length grow by 4.5 inches, while width increases by 1.7 inches and wheelbase by 1.1 inches. Nearly half of the extra length is added ahead of the front wheels, as the car’s once ultra-trim front overhang has ballooned to that of a more typical front-wheel-drive small car. Similarly, the windshield, originally very upright and close to the driver, is now more raked, and the dash has grown longer. The new Mini still looks like a Mini, but it is creeping inexorably toward the small-car norm.

The battle of the bulge

Mini engineers have had more success fighting weight gain, the true scourge of adulthood. Despite the new car’s significantly larger size and increased level of equipment, the third-generation Mini carries at most only 70 more pounds than its predecessor. Base curb weight now ranges from 2605 to 2795 pounds (up from 2535 to 2712 previously). The better news for both the Mini Cooper and Cooper S is that new, BMW-sourced engines provide enough additional grunt to easily obliterate any additional pounds.

More power, better mileage

The Cooper S now uses a BMW 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder making 189 hp and 207 lb-ft of torque, an increase of 8 hp and 30 lb-ft. That shaves 0.2 to 0.3 second off the car’s 0-to-60-mph sprint, which is now down to 6.5/6.4 seconds (manual/automatic). At the same time, city/highway fuel economy jumps to 23/37 mpg for the manual and 28/40 mpg for the automatic (preliminary estimates).

When three beats four

The bigger news, though, concerns the base Cooper. In place of the previous naturally aspirated four-cylinder engine, the standard Cooper switches to a turbocharged three-cylinder. Essentially the Cooper S engine with one cylinder lopped off, the three-banger displaces 1.5 liters and features the same direct injection twin-scroll turbocharger and BMW’s Valvetronic variable valve timing and doubleVANOS camshaft phasing. With one fewer cylinder to feed, it’s not surprising that the new Cooper easily tops its predecessor’s fuel-economy ratings—by a lot. The outgoing model was rated at 27/35 mpg city/highway (1 less in both cycles for the automatic); the new car is expected to post ratings of 30/41 mpg (with the automatic reaching 42 mpg on the highway).
More impressive, though, is that the base Cooper is now a lot more fun to drive. Again, a glance at the numbers is illuminating. Compared to the old four-cylinder, the new turbo three musters an additional 23 hp and 48 lb-ft of torque, for a total of 134 hp, and 162 lb-ft. Whereas the previous car’s 0-to-60 times were a torpid 8.4 seconds for the manual and a positively slothful 9.6 seconds for the automatic, the new Cooper zips to 60 mph in a much more energetic 7.4 seconds, with the automatic a tick faster at 7.3 seconds.
We drove the manual version, which also benefits from a new gearbox with short throws and very positive shift action. After the unpleasant clutch take-up we experienced in our Four Seasons Mini Countryman, we were very pleased by the easy modulation in our test example here. The six-speed’s top three ratios are very tall, but this engine is flexible enough to pull decently from very low revs, as peak torque arrives at only 1250 rpm. Even at high revs, however, what’s notable about the three-cylinder is that you hardly notice it; or, more accurately, that you hardly hear it. It’s refined rather than raucous—that maturity thing again.

Rough rider

One area where we might have wished for a little more refinement is in ride quality. A harsh ride has always been the Mini’s dirty little secret, the price you paid for its super-responsive handling (as well as a side effect of its run-flat tires). With an all-new suspension—albeit in the same damper-strut/multilink configuration—there was an opportunity to make some improvement here. That’s particularly true now that the Mini offers the option of variable dampers ($500) with three levels of firmness. The switchable dampers are controlled by the standard three-mode driving system: Sport mode (“Maximum go-cart feel”), default Mid mode (“Typical Mini driving fun”), and Green mode (“Low-consumption driving fun”). Besides affecting throttle mapping, automatic transmission shift points, and steering effort, the three modes also can increase the damper firmness by ten percent or relax it by an equal amount. Alternately, sport mode can be configured to call up only the more aggressive chassis calibrations or drivetrain calibrations. Even with the dampers in standard mode, though, impacts are sharp, and the firmer sport setting adds a high-strung busyness on relatively smooth pavement.
Our mostly low-speed drive through Puerto Rico didn’t provide the best setting to wring out the new chassis, but at first blush it appears to have preserved the brand’s characteristic immediacy. The narrow roads combined with the locals’ lackadaisical attitude toward the center line placed a premium on steering precision, and here again the Mini shines. An early adopter of electric power steering, Mini has always been an example of how to do it right. That remains the case with the new car. More so than in the past, however, the new Mini has an overall feel of solidity that’s more in keeping with the cars of its parent company.

Shades of the 3-series

The chorus of creaking interior plastic one often found in past Minis was conspicuous by its absence in the two cars we drove. It no longer feels as if the interior’s bold, circular styling is trying to keep you from noticing the cheap plastic bits. The cabin materials are much more BMW-like; the brand’s rubberized, soft-touch black plastic—familiar to anyone who has spent time in a 3-series—has replaced the hard surfaces on the dash, the door panels, and the center armrest. At the same time, Mini has made several welcome moves toward normalcy in the interior layout. The window, door lock, and power mirror switches can now all be found on the door panel; you select the temperature and fan speed with three round knobs; and the speedometer joins the tach in front of the driver.

Still silly if you want to be

While the brand has given up some of its goofy ergonomics, that doesn’t mean Mini’s quirky idea of fun has disappeared. If anything, it has been expanded. A new LED light ring around the central instrument glows in different colors in reaction to various inputs. Mini’s mission control returns (in which the car bursts in with cheery thoughts like, “Remember, always be Mini!”). There’s also dynamic music and other oddities. Mercifully, they all can be called up or shut down via the new iDrive-style controller. The greatly enhanced suite of connected capabilities—integration of Twitter, Facebook, and other apps along with the more traditional music services—is either ridiculous or essential, depending on one’s demographic. Other available new technologies include adaptive cruise control with braking assist, a backup camera, automatic parking assist, adaptive LED headlights, and a head-up display.
Sophisticated new equipment, a nicer interior, more rational ergonomics, and a quieter ride are some of the more pleasant effects of a Mini that has grown up. It has done so while maintaining its driving character and—in the base Cooper particularly—increasing its responsiveness. It may not have quite the same wrapped-around-the-driver feel of its smaller predecessors, but the Mini enters adulthood with its personality intact.

2014 Mini Cooper

On sale:March 2014
Base price: $20,745
Engine: 1.5-liter I-3 turbo
Power:134 hp @ 4500-6000 rpm
Torque:162 lb-ft @ 1250 rpm
Transmission:6-speed manual, 6-speed automatic
Drive:Front-wheel
Curb weight:2605/2675 lbs (manual/automatic)
Cargo volume:8.7 cu ft
EPA fuel economy: 30/41 mpg city/highway, 30/42 mpg city/highway (manual, automatic)
2014 Mini Cooper S Front Three Quarters 01

Note: this review focuses on the new 2014 Mini Cooper S. For our drive impressions of the new 2014 Mini Cooper, please Click Here to read our first drive review.

Despite the revolution that the Mini underwent in the transition from the final Alec Issigonis–designed derivative to the first model developed under BMW ownership, the car managed to remain a real icon, instantly recognizable the world over. As one might expect, then, the design of the third-generation "new" 2014 Mini Cooper takes no risks. The boxy Brit is slightly longer, wider, and roomier but otherwise familiar. For the first time, however, it shares key engineering elements with parent company BMW -- specifically a bunch of new front-wheel-drive models that BMW is going to market starting later this year.
Design-wise, we like the improved interior room, the more usable rear seats, the less quirky instrument panel, and the bigger trunk. The integration of grille and bumper, on the other hand, looks more heavy-handed, the large taillamps and the lower diffuser have diminished some of the coveted visual simplicity at the rear, and the longer and taller snout is controversial rather than pretty.
The cockpit attempts to blend tradition with modernity. The large circular central instrument -- which harks back to the original Mini -- survives but no longer houses the speedometer, which moves to join the tach in a small cluster atop the steering column. This brings essential information closer to the driver's field of vision, but because of the small scale and the busy calibration, you may nonetheless feel compelled to buy the optional head-up display. On the credit side, the bigger climate controls are now easier to operate, and the window switches shift to the door panels.
The redesigned interior moves closer to BMW in functionality. The central controller's shape and logic are akin to the iDrive system on which it is based, and Mini now apes BMW with its driving modes (green, mid, and sport). The modes calibrate throttle response, steering action, shift speed, damper control, exhaust note, and even the ambient lighting. Speaking of lighting, one cannot ignore the LED ring that frames the main instrument binnacle. It reflects the selected driving mode by glowing red, green, or amber; changes to red or blue as you increase or lower the cabin temperature; and lights up bright red when the engine approaches redline.
Slip into the comfortable and supportive sport seat, and the new Mini feels every bit as different from the competition as did its predecessors. Different, though, can sometimes just be wacky. Dial in Dynamic Music, for example, and the sound processor will match a chosen song to your driving style or to the turn-signal sequence. One also can earn points for at-the-limit cornering along with a computer-generated "Good job!" from the friendly spy in the cab. Silly? Yes, although these features can be switched off.
While the first- and second-generation models were wanting in the quality department, the materials are of a much better grade in this latest iteration, and the available equipment is more comprehensive. The touch controller is every bit as intuitive to use as BMW's iDrive, the 8.8-inch color monitor looks good, and the pricey LED headlights easily outclass the previous xenons. In addition to the larger trunk, owners are likely to appreciate the more generous leg and shoulder room up front and the 60/40-split rear bench (with optional recline), although getting into and out of row two still requires a certain amount of physical fitness.
Helping create that roomier cabin is a wheelbase that has been extended by 1.1 inches and a track that is up to 1.7 inches wider. To enhance that coveted go-kart handling, the engineers have increased torsional stiffness, improved weight distribution, lowered the center of gravity, and retuned the suspension (which again combines damper struts and a twist beam). Chassis assistants include torque-steer compensation and a brake-activated electronic differential lock. Extracost options include Dynamic Damper Control, which lets you choose between a sporty and a more comfort-oriented setting, as well as active cruise control with collision warning and automatic brake actuation.
We drove the Cooper S with the automatic transmission. Additional engine choices for U.S. buyers are a 1.5-liter three-cylinder in the base Cooper and the follow-up to the brawny John Cooper Works, with a 231-hp twin-turbo 2.0-liter. The 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder in the Cooper S develops 189 hp between 4700 and 6000 rpm (with the limiter at 6500 rpm). The maximum torque of 207 lb-ft plateaus from only 1250 rpm to 4750 rpm, thereby covering nearly 60 percent of the rev band. Better still, there is a brief full-throttle overboost function that ups the twist action to 221 lb-ft. The autobox version is not only 0.1 second quicker than the manual to 60 mph (6.4 seconds), it's also more economical (in the European cycle, at least). The sport version brings shift paddles and faster gearchanges.
The test car felt generally more grown-up than the model it replaces, which occasionally wavered between agility and twitchiness. Pushed hard on the autobahn, the new Mini is more firmly planted, less susceptible to crosswinds and pavement grooves, and quite stable overall. Through high-speed corners, however, we once or twice experienced a disconcerting rear-end liftoff shrug -- the kind of stuff that makes your neck hair bristle even though stability control remains totally passive. While wind and road noise are well suppressed, the intake rasp and the exhaust rumble are just about loud enough to remind you that this is the Cooper S. Still, on the autobahn the newcomer collected points for its solid braking performance and remarkable full-throttle grunt. As long as you keep the revs up by shifting down a gear or two, this little road shark will successfully chase much bigger fish.
On imperfect secondary roads, the seventeen-inch winter tires did nothing to help the rather brittle ride, and switching the dampers to comfort mode didn't help much. Although the new Mini copes much better with longer undulations, it needs a flat surface to excel. On a bumpy road, torque steer and a certain snappiness near breakaway speeds impair your confidence when you really push it. At the limit, understeer enters the scene before stability control eventually interferes with due subtlety. As it should be, the Mini III is a minimum-input, maximum-effect driving machine. A flick at the helm is all it takes to change direction, a stab at the brake squashes kinetic energy with vigor, and one pull at the downshift paddle summons enough revs for a slingshot acceleration maneuver. On smooth tarmac, the Mini is at its best, blending mind-boggling grip with ultrafast responses and amazing tactility. At the end of a ten-mile stretch of magical road, we instantly turned around and went back for an encore.
The range of Minis has grown with every generation, and this one is likely to again spawn two or three additional body styles. Later this year, Mini is expected to add a four-door hatchback. Due in 2015 are the four-seat convertible and the new Clubman, which this time gets four conventionally hinged doors and sits on a stretched wheelbase while retaining the split tailgate. Looking further out, we see follow-ups to the Countryman, the Paceman, and the two-seat coupe and roadster body styles. Still unconfirmed are other models, including a minivan and a sedan. In total, we could see as many as thirteen different body styles over the third-generation Mini's lifetime. Even so, you'll probably have no trouble recognizing all of them as Minis.

2014 Mini Cooper S

On Sale: Spring
Price: $24,000 (est.)
Engine: 2.0L I-4 turbo, 189 hp, 221 lb-ft
Drive: Front-wheel
Fuel Economy: 27/35 mpg (city/highway)
2013 MINI Cooper Front Three Quarters In Motion View 001
2014 Mini Cooper

New For 2014

Mini is entering a changeover year in 2014, which will see the first of the next-generation cars debut. The new hardtop is out first, on sale in early 2014 as a '14 model. The current-generation convertible (and all other body styles) will continue to be sold alongside the new hardtop as Mini takes its time rolling out the new versions over a period of a couple years.

Vehicle Summary

The standard Mini Cooper body style is known as the hardtop. This is the version from which all other Mini variants flow. The hardtop and its softtop sibling, the convertible, can be had in standard Cooper, Cooper S, or JCW (John Cooper Works) form. Note that some of the JCW bits can be had with an interior or an exterior JCW package, which includes some of the JCW visuals without the high-performance gear. The hardtop is also the model that has been the basis for more special editions than any other. Current special editions for the hardtop are the Baker Street, the Bayswater, the Hyde Park, and the Green Park; there is also a special version of the convertible called the Highgate. For the most part, these are option and appearance packages.

Overview

Everyone knows about the Mini Cooper, the extroverted little hatchback that made small cars fun again. The Mini is indeed small, which is great for racing around urban environs and, of course, for parking. At the same time, it has a decent amount of room inside -- at least up front. In back it's a different story; whoever sits back there will need to be either quite short or sitting behind pals up front who are willing to slide their seats a good ways forward. Everyone will need to pack light, as the cargo hold is really tiny unless you fold at least one of the rear seatbacks down.

Mini talks endlessly about its go-kart handling, and that really is true. Turn-in is immediate and the car corners flatly. The steering is quick, precise, and well weighted, particularly for a system with electric assist. All is great, really, until you hit a bump in the road. At that jarring moment, you realize the price one pays for the Mini's ultra-stiff chassis. It's even more jarring in Minis equipped with the (totally unnecessary) sport suspension or with larger wheels.

Performance-wise, the Cooper S and the John Cooper Works both easily live up to the Mini's zippy image; the base Cooper, not so much. The standard car's 1.6-liter four has only 121 hp and buzzes from 0 to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds, or a languid 9.6 seconds with the automatic. It does, however, return the best fuel economy, at 29/37 mpg (city/highway) with the manual and 28/36 mpg with the automatic. Neither of these figures is tops in its class. The much better choice is the Cooper S, whose turbocharged 1.6-liter pushes out 181 hp and is much more fun to drive, dropping the 0-to-60-mph time to 6.6 seconds (or 6.8 with the automatic). The John Cooper Works version, with 208 hp from the same engine, is an even better performer, but it's not that much better. It is, however, considerably more expensive, with a starting price on the high side of $30,000.

You'll like:

  • Nimble handling
  • Quick acceleration (Cooper S, JCW)
  • Retro styling

You won't like:

  • Harsh ride
  • Oddball switchgear
  • Tiny back seat

Key Competitors

  • Chevrolet Sonic
  • Fiat 500
  • Ford Fiesta
  • Hyundai Veloster
2014 Mini Cooper Front Three Quarter 01
Large footprint, long wheelbase, big engine, and a relaxed attitude. This is the grand touring formula. AUTOMOBILE’s Four Seasons 2014 Mini Cooper doesn’t check any of those boxes, but that didn’t stop me from driving the spunky red hatch all over Michigan for a few weekend getaways. On my trip to discover some of Michigan’s more scenic destinations, I also learned that the Mini Cooper is a surprisingly adept road-tripper, despite its city-car roots.
2014 Mini Cooper Front Three Quarters View 2
BMW is the latest automaker to come under EPA scrutiny, this time for the 2014 Mini Cooper. All versions of the three-door model now have revised fuel economy estimates that are up to 4 mpg lower than previously announced ratings.

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New 2014 MINI Cooper Pricing

Fair Market Price what is this?
$22,980
Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price
$25,150
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Certified Pre-Owned 2014 MINI Cooper Pricing

Certified Pre Owned Price
$24,250

Used 2014 MINI Cooper Values / Pricing

Suggested Retail Price
$25,150

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2014 MINI Cooper
2014 MINI Cooper
Base FWD 2-Dr Convertible I4
28 MPG City | 35 MPG Hwy
Top Ranking Vehicles - MPG
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3
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4
2014 MINI Cooper
2014 MINI Cooper
Base FWD 2-Dr Convertible I4
28 MPG City | 35 MPG Hwy
rank
4
2014 MINI Cooper
2014 MINI Cooper
Base FWD 2-Dr Convertible I4
$25,150
Top Ranking Vehicles - Price
rank
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2014 MINI Cooper
2014 MINI Cooper
Base FWD 2-Dr Convertible I4
$25,150

2014 MINI Cooper Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
1.6L I4Engine
Fuel economy City:
28 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
35 MPG
Horsepower:
121 hp @ 6000rpm
Torque:
114 ft lb of torque @ 4250rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats (optional)
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control (optional)
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation (optional)
Vehicle
50,000 miles / 48 months
Powertrain
50,000 miles / 48 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 144 months
Roadside
50,000 miles / 48 months
Maintenance
36,000 miles / 32 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
AIR BAGS:FRONTAL
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling a certain model year BMW i3 vehicle manufactured March 31, 2014, and certain 2014 MINI Cooper Hardtop vehicles manufactured February 2, 2014 to May 30, 2014. The affected vehicles may have been manufactured with an air bag inflator that was not assembled correctly. This could cause the air bag to not deploy properly in the event of an accident.
Consequences
If the air bag deploys improperly in the event of a crash necessitating deployment of the air bags, the seat occupant may be at an increased risk of injury.
Remedy
BMW will notify owners, and dealers will replace the front passenger side air bag, free of charge. The recall began in September 2014. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417.
Potential Units Affected
27
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
POWER TRAIN:AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION:CONTROL MODULE (TCM, PCM)
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014-2015 MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door, and Cooper S Hardtop 2 Door vehicles manufactured January 6, 2014, to October 17, 2014. During service appointments, dealers may have inadvertently reprogrammed the transmission control unit with software that may allow drivers to exit the vehicle when the transmission is not in Park. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 114, "Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention."
Consequences
If the driver exits the vehicle without the transmission being in Park, the vehicle could roll away as the driver and other occupants exit the vehicle or anytime thereafter. A vehicle rollaway increases the risk of injury to exiting occupants and bystanders.
Remedy
MINI will notify owners, and dealers will reprogram the transmission control module with the correct software, free of charge. The recall February 4, 2015. Owners can contact MINI customer service at 1-866-825-1525.
Potential Units Affected
1,928
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
STRUCTURE:BODY
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014-2015 MINI Cooper and MINI Cooper S Hardtop 2 Door vehicles and 2015 MINI John Cooper Works Hardtop 2 Door vehicles. The affected vehicles do not meet the side impact performance requirements for the rear seat passengers. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 214, "Side Impact Protection."
Consequences
If the side impact performance requirements are not met, rear seat passengers may be at a higher risk of injury during a crash.
Remedy
MINI will notify owners, and dealers will install additional energy absorption material between the rear interior side panels and the exterior vehicle body, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin September 12, 2015. Owners may contact MINI customer service at 1-866-825-1525. Note: this recall supersedes 14V-815.
Potential Units Affected
30,456
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
STRUCTURE:BODY
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014 Mini Cooper Hardtop 2 door vehicles manufactured December 1, 2013, to May 14, 2014. The affected vehicles do not meet the side impact performance requirements for the rear seat passengers. Thus, these vehicles fail to comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 214, "Side impact protection."
Consequences
If the side impact performance requirements are not met, rear seat passengers may be at a higher risk of injury during a crash.
Remedy
BMW will notify owners, and dealers will modify the interior side panels, free of charge. Interim notices were mailed to owners on February 19, 2015. Owners will be sent a second notice when parts become available. Owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-831-1117.
Potential Units Affected
3,085
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
TIRES:TEMPORARY/EMERGENCY SPARE TIRE
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014 MINI Cooper Hardtop 2-door vehicles manufactured January 7, 2014, to July 21, 2014. The spare wheel may have been attached under the car with a nut that is not self-locking.
Consequences
Vibrations from driving may cause the nut to loosen, allowing the wheel to separate from the car. If the spare wheel separates from the vehicle, it could become a road hazard and increase the risk of a crash.
Remedy
BMW will notify owners, and dealers will replace the spare wheel securing nut with a self-locking nut, free of charge. The recall began on November 20, 2014. Owners may contact MINI customer service at 1-866-275-6464.
Potential Units Affected
5,805
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
EQUIPMENT:OTHER:LABELS
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014-2015 MINI Cooper Hardtop two door vehicles manufactured December 1, 2013, to December 14, 2014. The affected vehicles may have been manufactured with an incorrect maximum capacity weight stated on the Tire Information Placard. Thus, these vehicles fail to comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 110, "Tire Selection and Rims and Motor Home/Recreation Vehicle Trailer Load Carrying Capacity Information for Motor Vehicles with a GVWR of 4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds) or less."
Consequences
The maximum weight listed on the label is incorrect (too low) and therefore does not comply with Federal Regulations.
Remedy
MINI will notify owners, and dealers will replace the incorrect labels with corrected labels, free of charge. Owners were mailed interim notification on March 18, 2015. Owners will receive a second notice when parts become available. Owners may contact MINI customer service at 1-866-825-1525.
Potential Units Affected
13,130
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
POWER TRAIN:AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION:CONTROL MODULE (TCM, PCM)
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014-2015 MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door, and Cooper S Hardtop 2 Door vehicles manufactured January 6, 2014, to October 17, 2014. During service appointments, dealers may have inadvertently reprogrammed the transmission control unit with software that may allow drivers to exit the vehicle when the transmission is not in Park. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 114, "Theft Protection and Rollaway Prevention."
Consequences
If the driver exits the vehicle without the transmission being in Park, the vehicle could roll away as the driver and other occupants exit the vehicle or anytime thereafter. A vehicle rollaway increases the risk of injury to exiting occupants and bystanders.
Remedy
MINI will notify owners, and dealers will reprogram the transmission control module with the correct software, free of charge. The recall February 4, 2015. Owners can contact MINI customer service at 1-866-825-1525.
Potential Units Affected
1,928
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
STRUCTURE:BODY
Summary
BMW of North America, LLC (BMW) is recalling certain model year 2014-2015 MINI Cooper and MINI Cooper S Hardtop 2 Door vehicles and 2015 MINI John Cooper Works Hardtop 2 Door vehicles. The affected vehicles do not meet the side impact performance requirements for the rear seat passengers. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 214, "Side Impact Protection."
Consequences
If the side impact performance requirements are not met, rear seat passengers may be at a higher risk of injury during a crash.
Remedy
MINI will notify owners, and dealers will install additional energy absorption material between the rear interior side panels and the exterior vehicle body, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin September 12, 2015. Owners may contact MINI customer service at 1-866-825-1525. Note: this recall supersedes 14V-815.
Potential Units Affected
30,456
Notes
BMW of North America, LLC


NHTSA Rating Front Driver
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Front Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Overall
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rollover
5
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
N/R
IIHS Overall Side Crash
N/R
IIHS Rear Crash
N/R
IIHS Roof Strength
N/R
IIHS Front Small Overlap
N/R

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2014 MINI Cooper

Depreciation
39.1%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$13,955
39.1%
Insurance
$6,580
18.5%
Fuel Cost
$8,777
24.6%
Financing
$3,027
8.5%
Maintenance
$1,898
5.3%
Repair Costs
$991
2.8%
State Fees
$424
1.2%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $35,652 What's This?
Value Rating: Excellent