Porsche – Automobile http://www.automobilemag.com No Boring Cars - Automotive Magazine Fri, 22 Jul 2016 22:13:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.2 A Second-Hand Porsche 911 R Sold for $1.3 Million in U.K. http://www.automobilemag.com/news/a-second-hand-porsche-911-r-sold-for-1-3-million-in-u-k/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/a-second-hand-porsche-911-r-sold-for-1-3-million-in-u-k/#respond Thu, 21 Jul 2016 18:31:00 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=970049 There were never any doubts that the purist-oriented 2016 Porsche 911 R is destined for collectible car greatness. With production limited to just 991 copies, the 911 R has collectability built in. But no matter how good or rare the car is, we never would have guessed prices would jump this much this soon. Autocar...

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There were never any doubts that the purist-oriented 2016 Porsche 911 R is destined for collectible car greatness. With production limited to just 991 copies, the 911 R has collectability built in. But no matter how good or rare the car is, we never would have guessed prices would jump this much this soon. Autocar is reporting at least one collector in the U.K. has paid 1 million pounds (roughly $1.3 million) for a second-hand 911 R.

That represents a seven-fold markup from the MSRP, which in the U.K. is £136,901. In the U.S., the 911 R starts at $185,950. Autocar cites Magnitude Finance, a finance company for high-end cars, for the pricing data. A spokesman from the company told Autocar that he believes the demand is due to the car’s enthusiast appeal and limited production. The 911 R gets many of the performance upgrades of the GT3 RS but benefits from a six-speed manual transmission.

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Though Magnitude Finance believes the 911 R is a solid investment, the spokesman suggested the £1 million example may have been an anomaly. The firm expects second-hand prices to be merely quadruple the MSRP, which means the 911 R’s appreciation rate is still astronomically high.

Read our review of the Porsche 911 R to see what all the fuss is about.

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Better With Boost? 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera Tested on Ignition http://www.automobilemag.com/news/better-boost-2017-porsche-911-carrera-tested-ignition/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/better-boost-2017-porsche-911-carrera-tested-ignition/#respond Tue, 19 Jul 2016 13:30:12 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=968695 Porsche 911 purists are resistant to change. That includes the first water-cooled models, the original 911 Turbo, all-wheel drive, and the PDK dual-clutch transmission. Now the German sports carmaker has added a turbocharged engine to the base model. But was it the right move? On this episode of “Ignition,” host Jason Cammisa tests a new...

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Porsche 911 purists are resistant to change. That includes the first water-cooled models, the original 911 Turbo, all-wheel drive, and the PDK dual-clutch transmission. Now the German sports carmaker has added a turbocharged engine to the base model. But was it the right move? On this episode of “Ignition,” host Jason Cammisa tests a new base 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera to find out.

Power for the new 911 Carrera comes from a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six engine rated 370 hp and 331 lb-ft of torque. To keep things simple, Cammisa opted for the standard seven-speed manual transmission and chose one without all-wheel drive, rear-wheel steering, active anti-roll bars, or the lightweight carbon ceramic brakes.

At the drag strip, the turbo 911 Carrera hit 60 mph in just 3.9 seconds and completed the quarter mile in 12.3 seconds at 114.7 mph. It also lapped the figure-eight in 23.7 seconds at an average of 0.84 g and held an average of 1.03 g around the skidpad. Stopping from 60 mph took just 95 feet.

After explaining how turbo lag affects engine response versus a naturally aspirated engine, Cammisa hands the keys over to professional racer and Motor Trend hot shoe Randy Pobst for some seat time on the 2.0-mile course of Thunderhill Raceway.

Check out the video below to see how the new turbocharged 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera compares to the BMW M2 coupe and to hear Cammisa’s final thoughts on the new turbocharged engine.

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http://www.automobilemag.com/news/better-boost-2017-porsche-911-carrera-tested-ignition/feed/ 0 Better With Boost? 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera Tested on Ignition - Automobile Porsche 911 purists are resistant to change. That includes the first water-cooled models, the original 911 Turbo, all-wheel drive, and the PDK dual-clutch transmission. Now the German sports carmaker has added a turbocharged engine to the base model. But was it the right move? On this episode of “Ig 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera
This Unofficial Porsche Vision Gran Turismo Concept is Gorgeous http://www.automobilemag.com/news/next-great-porsche-supercarconcept/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/next-great-porsche-supercarconcept/#respond Fri, 15 Jul 2016 20:01:40 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=968061 As much as we would like to see the mighty 918 Spyder sitting pretty on the race grid, the closest Porsche has come to building a strictly race-ready 918 Spyder was the optional Weissach package. For $84,000 more, Porsche offered the deletion of some amenities, and gave the car lighter carbon fiber trim pieces, lightweight...

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As much as we would like to see the mighty 918 Spyder sitting pretty on the race grid, the closest Porsche has come to building a strictly race-ready 918 Spyder was the optional Weissach package. For $84,000 more, Porsche offered the deletion of some amenities, and gave the car lighter carbon fiber trim pieces, lightweight magnesium wheels, flame-retardant upholstery, racing seat belts, and further aerodynamic elements. Overall, the Weissach Package dropped the car’s weight by 80 pounds, yet it was never a true racing car. If it ever saw reality, this 908-04 Concept would change that.

Created by six devout “car guys,” the 908-04 is aimed at not becoming a real car per se, but rather a concept car you can drive in Gran Turismo 6 as one of the company’s wildly popular VisionGT concepts. According to the designers, “We wanted to create a car that nobody makes anymore. A ‘Back to basics’ kind of feel, mainly focused on generating a feeling for the love of racing.” And by the images here, it’s definitely affecting us in a positive way.

Porsche Vision GT top view 04

The genesis of the project was to create a modern interpretation of a 1969 Porsche 908 LH using the 918 Spyder and 919 racecar architecture. As you can see, the 908-04 heavily uses the overall design of the 918 Spyder road car, but the entire exterior appears to have been lowered onto a 919 Le Mans racecar chassis. It also features the same type of wheels, and top exhaust ports as the 918 Spyder. Additionally, the car also features a throwback “long tail” that extends well past the rear wheels, and a front end from the Mission E concept Porsche debuted earlier this year.

“We made the choice to have the longtail because Porsches with this feature have something genuinely unique. And until now, nobody, as far as we know, has tried to create a modern version of it. In our opinion, it is a bit of a forgotten idea, so we thought it would be a ‘rebirth of an icon’ that would generate nostalgia in car and Porsche enthusiasts alike,” reads the release.

Hearkening back to the wonderful Porsche 917 race car is a giant fan on the top of the car, right behind the exhaust ports. The fan, like Adrian Newey’s Gran Turismo Red Bull X2014 Fan car uses that fan to create huge amounts of downforce that essentially sucks the car to the pavement. It’s the ultimate aerodynamic addition to the car that would likely already create more down-force than most racecars.

If you are scrambling to find your PS4 to download the car, we’ve got bad news. As of right now, this is not an officially sanctioned project from either Porsche or Polyphony Digital, the team behind Grand Turismo. For the meantime, it exists only in these beautiful renders.

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Porsche to Share New Twin-Turbo V-8 with Audi and Bentley Sedans http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsche-share-new-twin-turbo-v-8-audi-bentley-sedans/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsche-share-new-twin-turbo-v-8-audi-bentley-sedans/#respond Wed, 13 Jul 2016 23:00:56 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=967099 The redesigned Porsche Panamera‘s available twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 will also power certain Audi and Bentley models, Automotive News reports. The all-new engine will make its debut in the Panamera Turbo. Porsche is supplying the V-8 engines from its new plant in Stuttgart, Germany. “Porsche’s new engine plant will also contribute towards synergies within the Volkswagen Group,”...

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The redesigned Porsche Panamera‘s available twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 will also power certain Audi and Bentley models, Automotive News reports. The all-new engine will make its debut in the Panamera Turbo.

Porsche is supplying the V-8 engines from its new plant in Stuttgart, Germany. “Porsche’s new engine plant will also contribute towards synergies within the Volkswagen Group,” Porsche CEO Oliver Blume said at the opening of the new factory earlier this month.

In addition to the upcoming Porsche Panamera Turbo, the new engine will make its way into the next-gen Audi A8 and Bentley Mulsanne sedans.

2017 Porsche Panamera steering wheel 2017 Porsche Panamera interior 2017 Porsche Panamera front interior seats 2017 Porsche Panamera rear interior seats

The all-new twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 will produce up to 542 hp at 6,000 rpm, but is said to make 335 hp by just 3,000 rpm. A “Hot V” design, where the turbochargers sit in between the cylinder heads, makes the engine more compact overall. The compact design along with its lightweight all-aluminum construction is said to improve performance and handling. Porsche claims the new Panamera Turbo will reach 62 mph in 3.8 seconds.

In addition to being more powerful than the outgoing Porsche V-8, the new engine is said to be 30 percent more fuel efficient thanks to the automaker’s first use of cylinder deactivation. Four cylinders can be deactivated during partial load thanks to a new two-stage sliding camshaft.

The engine is also said to be built around a modular design enabling it for use in a hybrid powertrain setup. Porsche has invested nearly $88.6 million in the new engine plant, which is located not too far from the 911 factory. With its 400-employee workforce, the plant can crank out around 200 engines a day. The factory will eventually build the drivetrain for the fully-electric Mission EV sports car.

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Porsche 918 Spyder Meets 911 R http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsche-918-spyder-911-r/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsche-918-spyder-911-r/#respond Wed, 13 Jul 2016 10:00:33 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=966157 It’s not easy to be a purist when confronted by the Porsche 918 Spyder. Oh, I’m all about the manual gearbox and lightweight materials. Give me a loop of fabric over a heavy brushed-metal door handle any day. And yet the 918 Spyder—hybrid, four-wheel drive, PDK, the lot—makes me go weak at the knees. Especially...

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It’s not easy to be a purist when confronted by the Porsche 918 Spyder. Oh, I’m all about the manual gearbox and lightweight materials. Give me a loop of fabric over a heavy brushed-metal door handle any day. And yet the 918 Spyder—hybrid, four-wheel drive, PDK, the lot—makes me go weak at the knees. Especially this one. Finished in Liquid Silver and without the fixed wing of the Weissach package, this Porsche has a purity that literally stops you in your tracks. It’s also mesmerising to watch it whir around on electric power alone. The sculptural beauty, the sci-fi soundtrack … everything about the 918 Spyder seems not of this world.

Dammit, I shouldn’t think this phony zero emission stuff is cool, but the 918 Spyder makes it so. Just as I attempt to tear my eyes away from this extraordinary car as it maneuvers around a gravel parking lot, the driver flicks a little dial on the steering wheel and its 4.6-liter V-8 rips into life instantly. Everyone in the nearby vicinity just stares, mouth agape and clearly pondering exactly the same question: “How many internal organs do I need to sell to own a 918 Spyder?” The driver knows this effect well. He’s demonstrated the 918 Spyder to hundreds of people around the world and has seen the look a million times. He chuckles, blips the throttle a couple of times, shuts off the car, jumps out, and simply says, “It’s not just a car, right? It’s a masterpiece.” The assembled crowd nods as one. Hypnotized.

There’s a relatively narrow 911 parked alongside the 918 Spyder. White, green stripes, no wing. It looks tiny and—although this sounds ludicrous—quite ordinary. Of course it isn’t ordinary at all: it’s the new Porsche 911 R. This is the car that shuns PDK, turbos, air conditioning, and anything else that adds weight and impedes driver involvement; the car that takes a GT3 RS 4.0-liter flat-six engine and crams it into the narrower GT3 shell and chassis; the car that has been portrayed as the ultimate Porsche for real drivers.

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Both represent the pinnacle of Porsche, then. One signals the future, the other is inspired by the past. Today we drive them back-to-back to discover which delivers the biggest thrill. Simple.

The 10-year old inside me wants to run screaming and with arms joyously flailing around toward the 918. It has 887 horsepower, after all. Instead I summon what little composure I can find and swing open the door to the 911 R. I’d be lying if I said the low-slung supercar immediately evaporates from my thoughts, but boy does the R’s interior seduce. The one-piece carbon-fiber buckets are tightly swaddled in chocolate brown leather; the seat and back cushions are fabric, intricately finished in an old-school houndstooth pattern – just like a 356 or early 911. The steering wheel is small, with slim hollow-spokes, and there’s not a single button or dial to distract from its purpose. However, the real signature piece rises up from the central tunnel: A simple carbon fiber-topped gearlever etched with a H-pattern for its six forward gears plus reverse. It’s an unequivocal statement that this is a 911 that requires driving.

2016 Porsche 911 R grille 2016 Porsche 911 R engine cover 2016 Porsche 911 R wheel 05 2016 Porsche 911 R rotor 02

In case you’ve somehow missed the 911 R hype, here’s a simple rundown of what makes it so enticing: In terms of hardware it’s exactly as described before, a GT3 chassis and structure fitted with the 4.0-liter engine from the GT3 RS. It produces 493-hp at 8,250 rpm, 339 lb-ft at 6,250 rpm, is capable of 200 mph, and drives from 0-60 mph in 3.7 seconds. What’s really different, though, is the manual gearbox. It uses the casing from the PDK, but is fitted with just six ratios. Gears one through four are the same as a GT3, but fifth and sixth are longer. Why just six gears? To save weight, of course.

The R is the lightest 911 on sale at just 3,020 pounds. It features unique carbon-fiber front fenders, the magnesium roof from the GT3 RS, a carbon-fiber hood, plastic quarter- and rear-window glazing, carbon-ceramic brakes as standard, titanium exhaust, and lacks a further 10 pounds of sound deadening versus the already skimpy measures employed in the GT3. Air conditioning and navigation are deleted by default, but can be reinstated without a fee. It’s also a strict two-seater.

In terms of suspension, the R employs GT3 springs but with retuned Porsche Active Suspension Management dampers. The 911 R retains the rear-wheel steering system that serves GT3, RS, and Turbo models so well, but here it’s retuned for even faster response. There’s also a new rear diffuser to balance the car aerodynamically, while the automatically deploying rear wing runs at a steeper angle than that of a Carrera S to aid stability. Just 991 will be built and they’re already all gone. Want one? Be prepared to pay many multiples of the $184,900 sticker price.

Should you join the people lusting after this “purist’s” 911? Twist the key and when the dry, harsh tone of the flat-six fills the interior overlaid with the rattling of the (optional) lightweight flywheel, it’s hard not to think so. It’s not a pretty noise, but it’s loaded with intent. On the move, the engine is more tuneful; at low revs, there’s a lovely growl that resonates through the carbon-fiber seat. It feels special then, even before you’ve thought about pinning the gas pedal to its stop.

The R’s natural athleticism builds the anticipation still further. It really does feel like a car carrying little mass. Steering requires minimal effort and the car feels super-responsive; every tiny input produces an instant, precise reaction and you feel you need to calm your driving style so as to not overexcite the car. Compared to the weighty and locked-down feel of a GT3 RS, the 911 R feels narrow, short, and hyper alert.

What of the much feted new manual gearbox? It’s deliciously mechanical and accurate. Of course, with such a high-compression engine, it requires finesse to produce smooth shifts, but the reward is worth a million flicks of a paddle. It also helps to uncover the true character of this remarkable engine. In the GT3 RS, the PDK seems to demand you seek out the last few hundred rpm and live in that manic zone. With the manual, you tend to let the road unravel with fewer gearshifts and get to feel the engine’s clean, insistent mid-range and then marvel in a mix of awe and fear as it climbs and climbs toward peak power and the crazy 8,800-rpm limiter. The 911 R feels even more potent than a GT3 RS.

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The lightweight, alert impression given at low speeds remains as you start to extend the engine and work the simply fabulous carbon-ceramic brakes. Where the GT3 RS seems to get lower and wider the faster you go—the invisible hand of downforce doing its thing—the 911 R flows over the surface. The steering is perhaps too light, but it fits with the way the car breathes on the road and communicates every move. You feel the front start to ease into understeer and then bite again if you lift the throttle to restore balance; you sense the peculiar weight distribution through the small of your back and by way the R slips into mild oversteer on the brakes but then squats hard as soon as you accelerate, smearing its 305-section Michelin Cup 2 tires into the road.

These are classic 911 traits played out more progressively, but at much higher speeds. In fact, if you seek the 911 R’s ultimate limits, you’ll find it’s an incredibly capable car. There’s unflappable composure and despite the deliberate decision to step away from RS-style downforce as the mechanical grip generated is huge. Go really hard and you’ll discover it’s more prone to understeer than the wider-tracked RS and more progressive if you snap the throttle shut. Do that and though the R will then transition into oversteer, it’s not as quick to flick sideways, and the angle will be less lurid than in an unsympathetically-driven RS.

The black and white of understeer and oversteer don’t seem hugely important on the road in the R, though. What matters is that the chassis telegraphs its every move, and that it feels light, agile, and absolutely under the control of the driver. This is the color and texture that enriches the driving experience. I’d say an RS is more impressive still at maximum attack as it changes direction so accurately and has a real biting edge that ups the stakes, but at slightly lower speeds, the R just feels more alive. Looking to the past for inspiration was, it turns out, a pretty inspired decision.

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Can the 918 Spyder conjure up such pure driving enjoyment? A real sense of excitement even at lower speeds? Erm. Well. Yes. The 918 Spyder can do pretty much anything. It’s completely outrageous, wildly fast, and almost bewilderingly effective — but it’s also full of feedback and sensation. Yes, you could drive it for a lifetime on the road and never once exceed its sky-high limits, but you’d feel immersed in what it’s doing even at crawling pace. And the first time you wring the drivetrain out to 9,150 rpm is a moment that lives with you forever.

What strikes immediately about the 918 Spyder is how much is familiar and how much is totally unlike anything else. The 599-hp V8 engine has the same astonishing freeness of a Carrera GT’s V-10, but while your ears tell you the car should need revs to really fly, the electrical assistance means you’ve got massive and instant torque. In seventh gear, it has 944 lb-ft and takes off from 20 mph like the 911 R might in second gear. The overall effect is like having a 10.0-liter V-8 that somehow manages to keep on revving to eternity.

The gearbox is a dual-clutch system but again it’s faster, more positive, and just plain more exciting than the PDK in anything else I’ve experienced. It feels like the request via the upshift paddle and the resulting ratio change are simultaneous. The whole car seems to react without inertia—be it under acceleration, between gearshifts, or when you ask it change direction. Perhaps that’s not quite true, as it doesn’t feel as light on its feet as the 911 R initially. Steering is heavier and the four-wheel steering system can’t completely disguise the 918’s sheer size or its 3,692 pounds, but there’s real agility here, and the balance is wonderfully neutral. If you can get the 918 Spyder to understeer on the road then you’re probably reading this from prison already.

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For the most part, the 918 just grips and goes with a slight wiggle of its wide hips if you give it the full noise out of a turn. The ride is firmer than that of the 911 R; its stiff carbon-fiber structure with double wishbones at the front and a multilink rear seems to transmit noise and texture just like any other low, wide, carbon fiber-built supercar. This means that, on certain roads, the 911 R just might gain an edge here or there by handling a bumpy corner with more subtlety and hence greater speed. But the 918 wipes out any hard-won yards with one sustained burst of full throttle. To be honest, its lateral grip limits are so high it can drive away from the 911 R pretty easily if you’re determined to do so. More impressive still is that it feels so natural at speed. Remember, this is a car with an internal combustion engine mated to a 154-hp electric motor working the rear wheels, and another 127-hp electric motor with it’s own single-speed transmission acting on the front axle. What an achievement to make it perform so seamlessly.

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Of course, if you want to slow down, just click the little rotary dial mounted on the steering wheel from Race down to E-Power mode (there are also Hybrid, Sport Hybrid and Hot Lap modes) and the 918 becomes the silent assassin. The range is 18 miles, but the batteries recharge quickly and even without the petrol engine screaming away at you, the 918 Spyder feels genuinely quick. It’ll do 0-62mph in 6.2-seconds using just the twin electric motors. Alternatively, just slip along with that odd sci-fi whine and the noise of lightweight aluminum suspension working over lumps and bumps and stones rattling against the carbon-fiber monocoque. Even in E-Power mode, the 918 Spyder really is a feast for the senses.

Sadly this day had to draw to a close. Our time with the 918 Spyder and 911 R is all too brief, but then anything less than a month of long summer days would seem too little. They’re just so addictive to experience and try to exploit. With the 911 R, you’re learning how to extract the maximum from it in the best 911 tradition. It requires the driver to think and unpick its quirks to truly reveal its capabilities. But it sticks to another 911 tradition, too: Even before you can ever dream of driving it to its full potential, the R entertains and pulls you into every facet of the driving experience.

Jethro Bovingdon

I expected that the 918 Spyder wouldn’t match that at-any-speed involvement, that it would feel a bit inert and cumbersome below warp speed. Instead it totally defies those prejudices and manages to be enthralling whether in E-Power mode or the magnificently intense Race and Hot Lap modes. Just climbing down into its amazing interior and taking in the quality and finesse is unforgettable. It paints a picture of the future of the performance car as vivid and exciting as the 911 R despite being almost diametrically opposed in philosophy.

I suppose before all those miles had played out, before the 911 R and 918 Spyder had cast their spells on me, I’d hoped for a clear-cut answer. To discover beyond doubt whether 911 R or 918 Spyder has hit upon the blueprint for the future of real driving thrills. Instead, I end up elated but confused. How do you choose between sublime purity and artfully optimized technology when both can seemingly deliver raw feedback and intense involvement? I certainly can’t. Maybe the real answer is that the black art of creating the greatest drivers’ cars imaginable can be approached in many different ways, embrace new technology or celebrate simplicity, and yet evoke the same feelings and emotions. One thing I do know for sure is that the future of the sports and supercar is bright. And brilliantly diverse.

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Porsche 911 R rear end 10 2016 Porsche 911 R rear end 08 2016 Porsche 911 R rear three quarter 04 2016 Porsche 911 R rear three quarter 01 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 10 2016 Porsche 911 R rear three quarter 02 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 09 2016 Porsche 911 R rear three quarter in motion 03 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 11 2016 Porsche 911 R rear end 06 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 06 2016 Porsche 911 R rear end 01 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 15 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 07 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 16 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 05 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 14 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 17 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 08 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 03 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 12 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 04 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 19 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 07 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 01 2016 Porsche 911 R front view in motion 02 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 10 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 11 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 13 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 02 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 20 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 09 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 18 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 08 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter 06 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 01 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 03 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 06 2016 Porsche 911 R front end 03 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 05 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter 05 2016 Porsche 911 R front end 06 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter in motion 04 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter 02 2016 Porsche 911 R front end 05 2016 Porsche 911 R front end 04 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter 03 2016 Porsche 911 R front three quarter 04 2016 Porsche 911 R rear end 05 2016 Porsche 911 R exhaust 2016 Porsche 911 R wheel 09 2016 Porsche 911 R wheel 08 2016 Porsche 911 R wheel 01 2016 Porsche 911 R wheel 07 2016 Porsche 911 R wheel 05 2016 Porsche 911 R instrument cluster 01 2016 Porsche 911 R steering and center console 2016 Porsche 911 R seats 02 2016 Porsche 911 R rotor 01 2016 Porsche 911 R seats 01 2016 Porsche 911 R rear end 03 2016 Porsche 911 R instrument cluster 02 2016 Porsche 911 R grille 2016 Porsche 911 R headlamp 2016 Porsche 911 R hood 02 2016 Porsche 911 R hood 01 2016 Porsche 911 R in motion detail 2016 Porsche 911 R cabin 05 2016 Porsche 911 R cargo space 01 2016 Porsche 911 R engine cover 2016 Porsche 911 R cabin 04 2016 Porsche 911 R cabin 01 2016 Porsche 911 R badge 03 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder wheel 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder side profile 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder side profile in motion 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder rear view in motion 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder rear view in motion 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder rear end 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front three quarter in motion 04 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front three quarter in motion 05 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front view in motion 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front view in motion 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front view in motion 04 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front view in motion 05 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder rear end 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front three quarter in motion 03 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front three quarter in motion 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front end 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front three quarter in motion 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder exterior detail 03 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder exterior detail 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder exterior detail 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder engine cover detail 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder engine cover 04 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder engine cover 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder engine cover 01 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder badge 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder badge 01 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 22 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 19 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 18 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 17 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 16 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 15 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 14 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 06 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 07 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 08 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 09 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 11 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 12 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 13 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 05 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 04 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 03 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02

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http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsche-918-spyder-911-r/feed/ 0 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 14 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 21 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R side profile in motion 05 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder front view in motion 03 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 918 Spyder side profile in motion 01 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 Jethro Bovingdon 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 20 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 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Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 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Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02 2016 Porsche 911 R vs Porsche 918 Spyder 02
Spied! Next Porsche Cayenne Basks in the Spanish Sun http://www.automobilemag.com/news/spied-next-porsche-cayenne-goes-hot-weather-testing-spain/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/spied-next-porsche-cayenne-goes-hot-weather-testing-spain/#respond Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:30:22 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=966475 Our spy photographers recently caught the third-generation Porsche Cayenne testing on idyllic roads in Spain. Despite some camouflage, we can see the Cayenne doesn’t stray too far from its roots. The new Cayenne looks much like its predecessor, bearing a similar long nose, raked roofline, and rear window spoiler. The prototype shows creases on the...

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Our spy photographers recently caught the third-generation Porsche Cayenne testing on idyllic roads in Spain. Despite some camouflage, we can see the Cayenne doesn’t stray too far from its roots.

The new Cayenne looks much like its predecessor, bearing a similar long nose, raked roofline, and rear window spoiler. The prototype shows creases on the hood that are close together, although camouflage is hiding a few other key details up front. In back, the Cayenne is likely sporting a redesigned taillight cluster.

Expect the Cayenne to adopt a similar interior to the new 2017 Porsche Panamera. On that model, Porsche gravitated toward a cleaner cockpit design with fewer buttons. Instead, a large central touchscreen and touch-based controls on the center console dominate the interior design.

Porsche introduced the U.S. to the concept of an high-end luxury SUV when it brought out the Cayenne for the 2003 model year. The model wasn’t completely redesigned until the 2011 model year, gaining a new look and losing weight compared to the previous year. It’s unclear which model year will kick off the third generation of the Cayenne.

Check out the gallery below for a closer look at the next Porsche Cayenne.

Porsche Cayenne spy photos 09 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 08 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 07 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 06 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 05 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 04 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 02 Porsche Cayenne spy photos 01

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2017 Porsche Panamera: Six Things You Need to Know http://www.automobilemag.com/news/2017-porsche-panamera-six-things-need-know/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/2017-porsche-panamera-six-things-need-know/#respond Fri, 08 Jul 2016 10:00:56 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=965431 There’s been so much noise about the new 2017 Porsche Panamera it’s almost deafening. We’ve ridden in the prototype, spoken to the test driver, and got the full lowdown on the new Turbo and 4S versions at the recent official unveiling. Information overload. To cut through the spin and make sense of the many acronyms,...

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There’s been so much noise about the new 2017 Porsche Panamera it’s almost deafening. We’ve ridden in the prototype, spoken to the test driver, and got the full lowdown on the new Turbo and 4S versions at the recent official unveiling. Information overload. To cut through the spin and make sense of the many acronyms, we’ve picked through every detail to get down to the stuff that really matters. So this is it, the cool stuff you need to know and should care about.

  1. It’s Not Ugly

There was a certain majestic confidence to the original Panamera. Big, bold, and bulbous, it had that infamous hunchback look necessitated by then Porsche CEO Wendelin Wiedeking’s mild OCD about rear headroom. Designer Michael Mauer was forced to raise the roofline by 0.8 inches, and the resulting silhouette was distinctive but hardly beautiful. The all-new car finally realizes the vision of a sedan that strongly evokes the 911. In the metal (the panels are now all aluminium, as is the vast majority of the structure), its sheer scale is striking (198.8 inches long x 76.3 inches wide x 56.0 inches high) and though it doesn’t radiate elegance like an Aston Martin Rapide S, there’s a swagger and aggression that’s pure Porsche.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front view in motion

  1. It’s Fast — and Will Get Faster Still

The slowest 2017 Panamera at launch is the $101,040 4S. Powered by a 2.9-liter twin-turbocharged V-6, it produces 440-hp at 5,650 rpm and 405 lb-ft of torque between 1,750-5,500 rpm. With the optional Sport Chrono package, it hits 60 mph from zero in 4.0-seconds and can achieve 180 mph. The $147,950 Turbo is a monster, with a new and downsized 4.0-liter twin-turbo V-8 producing 550-hp at 5,750 rpm and 567 lb-ft from 1,960-4,500 rpm. It’s capable of 190 mph and hits 60 mph along the way in just 3.4 seconds. We’ve always found these figures to be conservative, so don’t be surprised if it gets very close to 3.0-seconds dead when we finally test it ourselves. All Panameras now come with a new eight-speed PDK gearbox. They reach their top speeds in sixth, with seventh and eighth set for efficiency and refinement.

This is just the start. The Panamera Turbo S will up the ante to 600 hp — and there will be two further Hybrid models, both of which are performance variants. “There is room for a Turbo S plus the Hybrids,” says Gernot Döllner, who headed up the new Panamera project. Expect the fastest Hybrid to go well beyond the Turbo S, with 918 Spyder-levels of functionality and a Nürburgring time somewhere below a Carrera GT’s 7 minute, 28 second mark. Sources suggest it could develop as much as 700 hp and 800 lb-ft.

Supposing you don’t need a 200 mph sedan, there will also be an entry-level rear-drive model and then a more sports-focused Panamera GTS, though sadly it won’t feature the old normally aspirated 4.8-liter V-8 this time around.

  1. It’s a Real Drivers’ Car

Much was made of the 2017 Panamera’s split personality at the grand reveal, and there’s no question that pure luxury was a cornerstone of its development. Despite the 911-style roofline, there’s more room for rear passengers than ever and the 918-inspired infotainment aesthetic is truly beautiful. Yet the biggest smile amongst the various Porsche executives was reserved for questions about its dynamic ability. “Owners of the old car will be shocked at how direct the car is, how light it feels,” says Döllner. “You know it’s a big car, but you can’t believe it when you drive it.”

Much of that promised agility is provided by the new largely aluminium MSB platform that will also underpin future Bentleys, but also the systems that Porsche has applied to it—namely rear-wheel steering and the new electrically-powered Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control roll-control system. We’ve seen active anti-roll bars on the Panamera before, but previously they were hydraulically powered. The new PDCC is similar to the Bentley Dynamic Ride found on the Bentayga and utilizes a 48v electrical system to suppress body roll more quickly and with greater power. It’s lighter, too. With PDCC you also get PTV Plus—a torque-vectoring-by-braking system.

Lars Kern, the test driver who set that amazing 7:38.40 lap at the ’Ring, welcomes the technology. “You jump in and feel comfortable and you know the car is exactly doing what you want,” he begins. “That’s the key part. We also have some things that help you, some systems. For example, rear active steering. It’s such a big car that this is important for areas such as Hatzenbach (a complex series of lefts and rights near the very beginning of the lap). There the car is really strong. The rear-steer really rotates the car but not over-rotates. It’s exactly the way you want.”

2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel side profile in motion

  1. The Long Wheelbase is Coming.

During our tour of the new production line at Porsche’s Leipzig factory, a little surprise was presented. Under the dazzling LED lighting of the “Quality Workshop” sat an unpainted Panamera body shell and chassis, every shutline measured and logged with the panel gaps marked in black pen every six inches or so all over the car. While the Porsche presentation focused on the near perfectly uniform 0.5-mm gaps recorded, the assembled journalists focused on the bigger picture. The much bigger picture. This was a long wheelbase car and even had a “LWB” designation plate inside. Porsche isn’t forthcoming with the exact dimensions, but the last stretched Panamera was 5.9-inches longer, so expect a similar increase.

 

  1. It’s the Fastest Diesel in the World…Except the U.S.

The 2017 Panamera 4S Diesel, like the petrol-powered Turbo, features a 4.0-liter V-8 engine with two turbochargers mounted within the Vee. It produces 422 hp between 3,500-5,000rpm and 627 lb-ft from 1,000-3,250rpm. Unlike the gasoline models, the 4S Diesel diverts all of its exhaust gas to one turbo at lower engine speeds to improve response. The second turbocharger (both feature variable vane technology from the 991 Turbo) comes on-stream at 2,700 rpm. This trick to improve response will also be seen in the Bugatti Chiron—with two turbochargers doing the work at lower engine speeds and all four as engine speed increases.

The Panamera 4S Diesel covers the 0-60 mph sprint in 4.1-seconds with the Sport Chrono package (which includes launch control) and doesn’t stop accelerating until 177 mph. It’s also around 35-percent more fuel efficient than the Turbo, according to European test cycles. Sadly, Porsche does not plan to bring the 4S Diesel to the U.S.

 

  1. You’ll Tick a Lot of Boxes Building the Ultimate Panamera

Want a Panamera Turbo that can get around the ’Ring in 7:38.40 even though you’ll never drive it anywhere near a circuit? Of course you do. So, let’s start with the $147,950 base car. Now add the 21-inch 911 Turbo Design wheel option at $3,630. That didn’t hurt too much. You’ll also need the Sports Package to get rear-wheel steering; it comes as a package with the variable assistance Power Steering Plus system, which is pretty nasty on a 911, so let’s hope it’s a more consistent setup for the Panamera. Also, you’ll need the Sport Chrono package and launch control. That comes in at $5,580. Then we’re going to need carbon-ceramic brakes. They reduce unsprung weight to help over the curbs and also reduce rotational forces, helping with acceleration and braking. That’s another $8,960, taking the total to $166,120.

Now we run into a problem. A crucial component of that ’Ring record car is the new 48v Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control system. Only you can’t get it. Not yet anyway. It’s not on the configurator and will be phased in over time. The old PDCC system was a $5,000 option on the Panamera (and came with Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus) so it’s hard to know how this will shake out. It’s a complex and highly sophisticated system, so let’s assume it’ll still add $5,000 or so to the Panamera Turbo’s sticker price. We’re up to $171,120. That’s before you decide Carmine Red paint looks good (it does) and that another $3,300 won’t break the bank. Two-tone leather at $530 is almost free, right? And Adaptive Sports seats look good at $1,540, the heated steering wheel is a must at $790, and who could live without the Burmester Surround Sound system at $5,390? You get the picture.

2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel rear three quarter 01 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel rear three quarter 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel side profile in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 01 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo cabin 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter in motion 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter in motion 01 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S front three quarter in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 02 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 03 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front view in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter in motion 01 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter in motion 02 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo top view in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera tire 02 2017 Porsche Panamera tire 01 2017 Porsche Panamera steering 2017 Porsche Panamera steering detail 2017 Porsche Panamera live reveal info screen 2017 Porsche Panamera live reveal info gear selector 2017 Porsche Panamera live reveal rear wing

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Test Driver Lars Kern on the 2017 Porsche Panamera http://www.automobilemag.com/news/lars-kern-2017-porsche-panamera-test-driver-interview/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/lars-kern-2017-porsche-panamera-test-driver-interview/#respond Fri, 08 Jul 2016 10:00:40 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=965417 Lars Kern is the guy who drove the new 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo around the Nürburgring Nordschleife in 7 minutes, 38.40 seconds. He’s wearing Porsche corporate “casual” clothes and is being largely ignored at the official unveiling of the Panamera in late June during a bizarrely overblown event in Berlin. On a vast stage and...

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Lars Kern is the guy who drove the new 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo around the Nürburgring Nordschleife in 7 minutes, 38.40 seconds. He’s wearing Porsche corporate “casual” clothes and is being largely ignored at the official unveiling of the Panamera in late June during a bizarrely overblown event in Berlin. On a vast stage and beneath a complex light show and pounding music, ballet and street dancers perform together; the idea is to reinforce the dual character of the more luxurious yet more athletic new car. It’s all slightly baffling and highly amusing, but I have to admit you can’t help but be impressed by the event’s sheer scale.

Anyway, Kern is chatting to a few friends when I ask if we can have a talk about that lap and the Panamera in general. He’s pleased to help and soon I’m very happy I’m not talking to a well-prepared suit trotting out the company line. With Kern, I can truly get an insight into what this car is like. He’s driven it extensively on racetracks and roads, and can describe its character and dynamics brilliantly without the usual spin.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter in motion 01

By now you probably know all about the new 2017 Panamera. You’ve seen the more elegant roofline, the 911-style rear end, and gorgeous interior with touches lifted straight from the 918 Spyder. You’re well versed on the new 550-horsepower, 4.0-liter V-8 twin-turbocharged engine featured in the Turbo and the 440-hp 2.9-liter V-6 twin-turbo in the Panamera 4S. Both utilise a new eight-speed PDK gearbox, with top speed reached in sixth, while seventh and eighth are geared for refinement and efficiency. The 4S hits 60 mph in just 4.0-seconds with the Sport Chrono package and tops out at 180 mph. The Turbo lowers the acceleration time to 3.4-seconds, and the V-8 will push this 4,398-pound machine to 190 mph.

There’s more, too, from re-engineered air suspension for the Turbo to the optional PDCC roll-control system that now utilizes electric motors rather than hydraulic pressure to stabilize the car. There’s an optional rear-wheel steering system that can turn the rear wheels up to 2.8-degrees, of course, to further aid low-speed agility and high-speed stability. That’s a powerful tool. On the 911 GT3 the steering angle is set to a maximum of 1.5-degrees, and perhaps this is a hint Porsche has exaggerated its effects here to counter the Panamera’s sheer weight and size. The list of new ingredients is typically thorough and highly impressive, but what about the finished dish? Until we drive it, Kern is about our best hope of trying to understand just how the new Panamera performs.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo cabin

You’d like Lars Kern. He races at the Nürburgring, tests Porsche’s road and race cars, owns a 997 GT3 RS, and loves manual gearboxes. He’s also not one for toeing the company line.

“I was driving the car for the first time about one year ago and we’re always discussing things, asking me to do more laps,” he says. “Our chassis and development guys are really, really good drivers as well and really know what to do. But they always like a second feeling about the car so they ask me to do some laps and I gave them some information, what I think as a race driver.” So what did he think? “I think one year ago the car wasn’t really driving. It’s like this. In development, you always have cars that are shitboxes at this time. But you can feel where it is going. I felt at this time that the car was quite understeery, but we’ve now made it much more neutral. Also now with PDCC—it’s not hydraulic anymore, it’s electric—you get a much better initial reaction, plus it’s faster and lighter.”

Faster and lighter it might be, but the lack of body roll can be problematic for those things so prized by Porsche—feedback and driver enjoyment. Most engineers look at you like you’re stupid if you dare to suggest that suppressing weight transfer to such an extent can create an artificial and detached driving experience, but Kern admits as much.

“At the beginning you lose the feeling for the car, where is the limit,” he agrees. “Because even with race cars, although they are stiff they are rolling, behaving as you expect. So this was quite difficult at the beginning. But if you really do go to the limit, the car still has some roll and it really gives clear feedback. It’s not dead, you can really feel the limit, whether it’s the front or the rear.”

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front view in motion

Even with such locked-down body control, the 7:38.40 lap time is incredibly impressive—as fast as a Lexus LFA and faster than a Cayman GT4, for example. How did the Panamera do it? Kern explains, “Like in all Porsches it’s the drivability. You jump in and feel comfortable and you know the car is exactly doing what you want. That’s the key part. We also have some things that help you, some systems. For example, rear active steering. It’s such a big car that this is important for areas such as Hatzenbach (a complex series of lefts and rights near the beginning of the lap). There the car is really strong. The rear-steer really rotates the car but not over-rotates. It’s exactly the way you want.”

Later in some of the faster sections of the track, the rear-steering setup once again receives praise. “Actually I felt the car more in the end: What the car needed, how much steering angle, throttle,” he says. “Especially in the slow corners with the rear-axle steering, it really kicks the car, and through the fast corners like Flugplatz and Schwedenkreuz it’s really stable. I think the minimum speed over the crest at Schwedenkreuz is [126 or 127 mph], which is f***ing fast. I looked down and thought, wow, that’s cool.”

Kern’s enthusiasm really bubbles through as he speaks, as does the surprise at just how effective the Panamera Turbo is around this most testing of tracks. “Although you’re driving such a big car, it really feels like a sports car,” he reiterates, almost like he’s still trying to come to terms with it himself. “But still there’s luxury. For example, at Antoniusbruche (the flat-out kink on the long, long straight) you’re doing [183 mph] but really like this:” He then mimes loose-limbed relaxation on the steering wheel. “With a 911 Turbo or GT3 you’re more like this,” and his arms stiffen and his hands fight back the imaginary bumps and wheel fighting in his hands.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo top view in motion

Kern set the killer lap in June. Porsche tried initially to nail the time after the 24-hour race at the ’Ring back in late May, but the attempt was scuppered by mixed conditions. The company returned and in the end, it came down to five individual laps recorded over a four-hour exclusive test session. At the end of each lap, the car would get a new set of the Yokohama Advan Sport tyres. “[Stability control] was off,” begins Kern. “We always turn PSM off because with all our standard cars we are doing lap times [at the ’Ring], but normally we don’t promote them. We are doing it for ourselves, to see where we are if you like. So PSM off as we want to judge the car and not the systems. And the lap time was done in [automatic mode]. I was not shifting myself. At the beginning I was but the guys told me to leave the car [alone] as it exactly knows what to do—just concentrate on steering, throttle and brakes.”

Kern had done a series of 7:41s in that first week of testing and felt the car wouldn’t go any quicker but better conditions helped on the second attempt. He was happy about that. “For me it was the maximum I could do but the licence plate said 7:38, that’s what they made, so I knew my task,” he says. No pressure, then. Lap four was close. “I did a 7:39 but had gone through the Karussell [and made a mistake by going] up and out of it and then back in,” he remembers with a chuckle. “So I said ‘OK, give me one new set and I’ll do the 7:38.”’ True to his word the time came. A lap completed in 7:38.40.

So what, right? Who needs a big luxury saloon so capable on a racetrack? Kern is unequivocal in response to the question. “To me the lap time is still relevant and important,” he says. “It shows how sporty the car is. Everyone knows the place, everybody tries to set a good lap there, and I think the next competitor for this car is a minimum of 20-seconds away.”

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 01

That yawning gulf is obviously a source of great pride for everyone at this Panamera launch and a personal triumph for Kern. “We are driving other [manufacturers’ cars] for sure, but we don’t need to benchmark. We are somewhere between an S Class—that’s the luxury benchmark—and an M5 or something similar. The [Panamera] is what it is, it’s unique and special. We’ve seen the Alfa Giulia there testing with Pirelli Trofeo R tyres. This is something we don’t want to do as it’s not relevant for a client. We’re doing it for marketing too, but really it’s to prove how sporty the car is, not to cheat on our clients. Normally I’m the hardcore guy. I love having a 997 GT3 with manual gears, I don’t give a shit about touch displays…but this car is really great. Even for me.”

Of course he would say that. He’s here on official duty. But in the short time I spend with this guy I get the feeling he speaks the truth. Or at least what he believes. One thing’s for sure: I can’t wait to drive the new Panamera Turbo now, and that’s got a lot to do with Lars Kern and nothing to do with those weird dancers and the flashy light show.

2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel rear three quarter 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel side profile in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter in motion 02 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 03 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S front three quarter in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter in motion 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel rear three quarter 01 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter in motion 01

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Classic Car Market Values Are Outpacing Hedge Funds http://www.automobilemag.com/news/classic-car-market-values-are-outpacing-hedge-funds/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/classic-car-market-values-are-outpacing-hedge-funds/#respond Wed, 06 Jul 2016 19:21:07 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=965061 A new report from the Financial Times , confirming what many of us usually joke about, reveals the values of significant vintage and collector cars have handily outperformed a number of top global hedge fund managers “over the past decade.” FT cites a study from the Knight Frank Luxury Investment Index, outlining the meteoric rise of collector...

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A new report from the Financial Times , confirming what many of us usually joke about, reveals the values of significant vintage and collector cars have handily outperformed a number of top global hedge fund managers “over the past decade.”

FT cites a study from the Knight Frank Luxury Investment Index, outlining the meteoric rise of collector cars over the past ten years. Apparently, if you bought into the market a decade ago, you might have seen a return of 161 percent after five years, and a whopping 467 percent after ten. Not convinced? Average hedge funds returned 4.75 percent and 7.83 percent over five and ten years. If you shrink that down to a one-year span, the growth figure drops to a 17 percent increase, whereas hedge funds saw a decrease of two percent.

1963 Porsche 356 B 2000 GS Carrera 2 Coupe

Before you rush out and plunk down hard cash on that rusted-out Beetle down the street, it’s important that those interested in making significant chunks of money in the collector car industry realize these growth percentages primarily represent sales of investment-grade vehicles. While you might see the value of a 1965 Ford Mustang raise slightly, you are much more likely to make large profits on cars that are well into the six- and seven-figure range.

As a result of this market rise, there is a noticeable surge in supply as well, and many more collectors are willing to offer up their valuable assets than ever before. This results in an uncertain future for the market, as investors might slowly back out as values gradually dip down.

“If you think that you will buy a Ferrari and it will double or triple in price over the next to two or three years, I’m not sure that would be the best advice,” Fritz Kaiser, executive chairman of a wealth management firm told FT. “ But if you are a collector, then now is a good time to buy.”

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The 2017 Porsche Panamera is Seriously Fast at the ‘Ring http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsches-new-panamera-seriously-fast-ring/ http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsches-new-panamera-seriously-fast-ring/#respond Wed, 29 Jun 2016 19:42:37 +0000 http://www.automobilemag.com/?p=962223 A 2006 Porsche 911 Turbo, Lexus LFA, 2011 Lamborghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Superleggera, 2009 Nissan GT-R, and a 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia. Porsche just delivered a blow to the egos of every single one of these supercars with a new blistering Nurburgring laptime set by the 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo. 7 minutes and 38 seconds...

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A 2006 Porsche 911 Turbo, Lexus LFA, 2011 Lamborghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Superleggera, 2009 Nissan GT-R, and a 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia. Porsche just delivered a blow to the egos of every single one of these supercars with a new blistering Nurburgring laptime set by the 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo.

7 minutes and 38 seconds is all it took to get the heavy luxury sports sedan around the infamous Green Hell, just as fast as those supercars mentioned above. For a normal sports car, less than eight minutes is fast, but clocking in at only 7:38 is momentously fast for a sedan. For comparison, the last Porsche Panamera Turbo was only able to get around the nightmarish track in 7:56, and that was in the hands of famed racing driver Walter Röhrl. Being able to shave 18 seconds is downright mind-blowing.

If this still fails to impress, consider that Alfa Romeo touted its Giulia Quadrifoglio sedan as the fastest four-door to hustle around the Green Hell. That car completed a lap in a scalding 7:39, but there were rumors of the Giulia running on racing slicks, along with reduced weight over the production model. Even without the purported weight savings on the Giulia The Panamera Turbo is a substantially heavier full-size car, with an advanced all-wheel drive system, where the Giulia is a raw, rear-wheel drive mid-size sedan.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo top view in motion

The new Panamera Turbo uses a brand new 4.0-liter twin-turbo V-8 engine pumping out 550 horsepower and 567 lb-ft of torque, giving it the ability to launch to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds and hit a top speed of 190 mph. Given these are likely conservative estimates by Porsche, the new Panamera is truly worthy of being labeled a super sedan. In fact, Porsche claims it’s the fastest sedan in the world.

The Panamera’s lap time becomes even more impressive if you look at the cars that have achieved only marginally better result, which include a Pagani Zonda F with a 7:27 and a Ferrari Enzo with 7:25. It also is worth mentioning that this new Panamera Turbo wasn’t running race-spec tires, like the Alfa Romeo Giulia was during the record-setting run, but instead retained the stock road tires available to both you and I from a Porsche dealership.

Initially, the Panamera launches in the U.S. in both Turbo and 4S trim. Prices begin at $101,040 for the 4S, and $147,950 for the Turbo.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front view in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo top view in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter in motion 02 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo rear three quarter in motion 01 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 03 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 02 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo front three quarter 01 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo cabin 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter in motion 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S rear three quarter in motion 01 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S front three quarter in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel side profile in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel rear three quarter 02 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel rear three quarter 01 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter

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http://www.automobilemag.com/news/porsches-new-panamera-seriously-fast-ring/feed/ 0 Porsche’s New Panamera is Seriously Fast at the ‘Ring - Automobile A 2006 Porsche 911 Turbo, Lexus LFA, 2011 Lamborghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Superleggera, 2009 Nissan GT-R, and a 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia. Every single one of these quote unquote, supercars, just took a humiliating blow to their egos due to Porsche stomping the Nurburgring with the company’s 2017 Paname Panamera 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo top view in motion 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter 2017 Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel front three quarter