2015 Jaguar F-Type

Base RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6 auto trans

2015 jaguar f-type Reviews and News

2014 Jaguar F Type S Coupe And 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 22
AUTOMOBILE is in a committed Four Seasons relationship with two stellar sports cars. First, there’s the 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray, which we picked up in May 2014, and second, there’s the 2015 Jaguar F-Type S, which came along two months later. We love them both—the Corvette was our AUTOMOBILE of the Year for 2014, and the F-Type was named an AUTOMOBILE All-Star the same year. As we near the conclusion of our time with both cars, though, we feel compelled to decide which we’d prefer in a committed relationship.
2014 Jaguar F Type And 2015 Chevrolet Corvette 03
To settle things once and for all, we took both on a romantic vacation, heading south from our Michigan office toward roads in southeast Kentucky that AUTOMOBILE editors have been tearing up since the tenure of our magazine’s founder, the late David E. Davis Jr. We already know both cars to be great long-distance companions. The ’Vette has clocked more than 26,000 miles zigzagging across the Midwest and East Coast, and the Jag has traveled from Los Angeles to Detroit, racking up more than 23,000 miles.
2014 Jaguar F Type S Coupe And 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 08

We haven’t seen a Chevy and a Jag nip at each other’s heels since the early 1960s, when the original Stingray competed with the beautiful E-type.

As we cross into Ohio, daily news editor Eric Weiner radios from the F-Type and advises prudence, “Let’s keep it at 9 mph over the speed limit.” I call back, “Sure.” Then I gun the Corvette in third gear and roar by him. There’s not much he can do about it. The F-Type, with its supercharged V-6, can make some moves, but the Corvette has two extra cylinders and 80 horsepower more, and it’s just a faster girl. A 2015 Jaguar F-Type R, with its 550-hp supercharged V-8, could deliver comparable performance to the Chevy, but it would cost $99,925, which is 650-hp Corvette Z06 money. As it is, our Four Seasons F-Type S, with options including a full leather interior and a sport package (bigger brakes, two-mode exhaust, sport seats), costs $24,515 more than our Corvette, which itself has bigger brakes (part of the Z51 package), magnetorheological dampers, and competition seats. The Jaguar V-6 manages only a small fuel-economy advantage over the ’Vette’s pushrod V-8. We’ve observed 21 mpg during our Four Seasons test in the F-Type versus 20 mpg in the Corvette.
The Jag makes the most of its assets, though. The supercharged engine responds instantly to throttle inputs, like a dog straining at its leash. Both cars have a sport exhaust mode, but the Jaguar is louder and more maniacal, playing a constant soundtrack of pops and snarls. When I tell a curious local at an Ohio gas station that a 3.0-liter V-6 is making all this racket, he replies with an incredulous and appreciative expletive.
2014 Jaguar F Type S Coupe Cabin
This F-Type S also pairs a lot more luxury with its sportiness than the Chevy does. You’ve probably heard a lot about how nice the C7 Corvette’s interior is. The Jaguar snorts with disdain at such a notion, as if to say, “Yes, old chap, we’re sure that is genuine leather. And what an interesting shade of red you’ve chosen for your seats.” Materials, switchgear, and the way the panels fit together have all improved in the new Corvette but still don’t compare to a Jaguar. The Corvette’s cabin is also louder than the F-Type’s and has become more so in recent months, as worsening squeaks and rattles have joined wind and road noise.
That said, we’ve packed most of our gear in the Corvette, which boasts a precious 4 cubic feet more of cargo space than the F-Type. The Chevy is also easier to see out of and has more intuitive controls. We initially kept getting lost in the seven-speed manual gearbox, but after many months, we can guide the shift lever through its gates with smooth flicks of the wrist. Not the same for the F-Type’s automatic shifter, which we often put into neutral when we intend to be in drive.
2015 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 Cabin
Both cars are lookers. We’ve garnered more attention in them than in any Four Seasons car since we had an Audi R8 in 2008. On this journey through the Midwest, however, the Jaguar receives far more stares. At a McDonald’s in Kentucky, an employee walks right past the Corvette to ask how much the Jaguar costs and seems unfazed when we tell him it’s $92,575. “You’ve made my day,” he says, before going back to work.
Maybe the Corvette is insulted by the lack of attention it gets, because shortly thereafter, it throws a temper tantrum. When I step on the throttle in second gear to chase Weiner back onto the highway, the ’Vette coughs, slows, and finally stalls in the middle of rush-hour traffic. This is embarrassing. Worse, it’s not just an ill-timed fluke. The Corvette has spent the better part of a month in service bays over the past year with issues ranging from leaky rear differential seals to a passenger airbag recall. Most recently, it needed a tow to a dealership when it failed to start. The technicians replaced the fuel pump under warranty.
2014 Jaguar F Type S Coupe And 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 01
It seems that fix was more like a patch. I’m able to restart the car but am left staring at a check engine light, and OnStar remotely diagnoses a problem with the fuel-sending unit. Game over, it would seem. Or perhaps not. The navigation system says we’re less than two hours north of Bowling Green, Kentucky, home of Corvette manufacturing. If there’s any place where a Corvette can get a major repair in a jiffy, it’s there. I limp onto I-65 South and ease into the right lane. The F-Type, which had looped back to find its downed companion, hangs close as an escort, no doubt feeling schadenfreude. “You know the best thing about this F-Type?” gloats Weiner. “It’s never broken down.” The Jaguar hasn’t required a single warranty repair during its time with us.
The next morning, mechanics at Campbell Chevrolet in Bowling Green determine that their counterparts in Ann Arbor had replaced the fuel pump during our previous episode of fuel system failure but not the computer that controls it. In Michigan we had to wait a week for parts, but here the supply lines are considerably shorter. After only a few hours, our Corvette emerges from the service bay primped and ready to return to the party.
2014 Jaguar F Type S Coupe And 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 32
We pick up a winding thread of asphalt about an hour north of Bowling Green and follow it as long as the light holds. The Jaguar feels a bit more eager and more accessible. Its steering, still hydraulically assisted, feels sharper than the Corvette’s electric power setup, and its rear end rotates sooner in a corner. But the Corvette ultimately tolerates more bad behavior and even encourages it. The faster you go, the harder it sticks, daring you to stay on the gas. When you finally say uncle, the brakes stop the car with more authority than the Jaguar’s. As Weiner notes, “There’s something intense and brutal about the Corvette that makes me forgiving of its shortcomings.”
It’s true—we still love the Chevrolet Corvette despite its misbehavior. It is, no doubt, the superior driving machine, the one we’d choose for a day at the track or on a deserted back road. But these cars, which sell for luxury car prices, are not cheap dates for weekend trysts. We expect to be able to drive them every day, rain or shine. When it’s time to slog back to Michigan the next morning to finish this 1,200-mile courting ritual, I’m relieved to be in the Jaguar F-Type. It’s as beautiful as the Corvette and nearly as thrilling on a back road, and the rest of the time, it’s more comfortable, more carefully crafted, and—we can’t believe it either—more reliable. The Jaguar F-Type is a lovely, cultured girl whom we would be proud to drive home to Mother.
2014 Jaguar F Type And 2015 Chevrolet Corvette 02

2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 Specifications

Price: $54,795/$68,060 (base/as tested)
Engine: 6.2L OHV 16-valve V-8/ 460 hp @ 6,000 rpm, 465 lb-ft @ 4,600 rpm
Transmission: 7-speed manual
Layout: 2-door, 2-passenger, front-engine, RWD coupe
EPA Mileage: 16/28 mpg (city/hwy)
Suspension F/R: Control arms, transverse leaf springs
Brakes F/R: Vented discs
Tires F/R: 245/35R-19?/?285/30R-20 Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4
L x W x H: 176.9 x 73.9 x 48.6 in
Wheelbase: 106.7 in
Weight: 3,435 lb
Weight Dist. F/R: 49.4/50.6%
0-60 MPH: 3.9 sec
1/4-Mile: 12.2 sec @ 117.7 mph

2015 Jaguar F-Type S Coupe Specifications

Price: $77,925/$92,575 (base/as tested)
Engine: 3.0L supercharged DOHC 24-valve V-6/380 hp @ 6,500 rpm, 339 lb-ft @ 3,500-5,000 rpm
Transmission: 8-speed automatic
Layout: 2-door, 2-passenger, front-engine, RWD coupe
EPA Mileage: 19/27 mpg (city/hwy)
Suspension F/R: Control arms, coil springs
Brakes F/R: Vented discs
Tires F/R: 245/40R-19?/?275/35R-19 Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
L x W x H: 176.0 x 75.7 x 51.5 in
Wheelbase: 103.2 in
Weight: 3,809 lb
Weight Dist. F/R: 52.0/48.0%
0-60 MPH: 4.3 sec
1/4-Mile: 12.9 sec @ 107.4 mph
2015 Jaguar F Type S Front Three Quarters
Here in the big empty spaces far to the west of Barcelona, the 2015 Jaguar F-type coupe is pretty much the only vehicle on the road that isn’t a tractor. As the people in the ancient villages turn and stare, we feel obligated to give a sort of polite, royal wave, as if we were the King of Spain. Ah, yes, we’re on important business, you know.
Only this Jaguar sports car is nothing like the refined GT car that you might imagine it to be. The F-type coupe is tough, fast, and even a little bit angry. It asks whether you measure up, and it’s not inclined to make excuses if you lack the requisite professional skills. And it is not always an altogether pleasant place to be.
As we find our way up a rocky defile on a narrow road, we see the grand house perched on a hillside where Jaguar has arranged for us to stop for lunch. It is actually Ferrer-Bobet, the newest, finest winery in Spain, yet it looks exactly like the lair of some villain in a James Bond movie. Apparently Jaguar isn’t kidding about making itself over by embracing the most glorious expressions of being bad.

Not just the F-type convertible with a hat on

The Jaguar F-type convertible is a nice car, perfect for taking a quick drive for ice cream if you want to get to the ice cream store really, really quickly. The 2015 Jaguar F-type coupe isn’t much different than the convertible in the way that it’s put together, yet it’s more than just an F-Type wearing a hat.
It is, of course, a very nice hat. We love the sweeping arc of the roof, especially when it’s matched with the optional, panoramic moonroof. The hatchback and the swelling rear fenders evoke the spirit of the sensuous Jaguar E-type of the 1960s, and yet this is a modern car, not a retro one. Wayne Burgess, the director of Jaguar’s design studio for production vehicles, points out the distinctive graphic of the side glass in the pillarless coupe and the way the car seems to sit on its rear wheels, as if poised to leap ahead.
The roof increases the torsional rigidity of the all-aluminum chassis by 80 percent, and when you see the naked aluminum, you appreciate just how stout this car’s bones are, notably the big torque boxes beneath the cockpit, the complex cross brace between the B-pillars (if this car had B-pillars, which it doesn’t), and the high-strength, hydro-formed aluminum beam in the roof rails.
Once clothed in its aluminum bodywork, the F-Type coupe looks thick and tough, and there’s nothing sleek about the impression it makes on its 103.4-inch wheelbase. It’s a Jaguar, and yet not the Jaguar you expect.

Obsessed with power in every way

The roads across the western fringes of Catalonia far from Barcelona resemble those in the best parts of California, winding adventurously through dry, narrow valleys and then across ridges marked by naked rock. You pass by olive groves and almond orchards that are struggling to survive the parched climate.
We’re driving the F-type S coupe with its 380-hp, supercharged 3.0-liter V-6, which is a half step up from the standard F-Type coupe with its 340-hp, supercharged 3.0-liter V-6. The car is plenty fast, as you’d expect from a 3514-pound package, and the V-6 has a unique warble as you wind it up. The ZF-built eight-speed automatic transmission delivers crisp, quick shifts. A rear wing deploys at 70 mph.
The rest of the hardware performs with equally muscular intensity. The brakes are big and powerful, with 15.0-inch rotors in front and 14.8-inch rotors in the rear. (Carbon-ceramic rotors are an option.) This S-model’s standard 19-inch wheels carry 245/40R-19 front, 275/35R-19 rear Pirelli PZero tires, and you can feel them hunting their way across changes in road camber. The car rocks from side to side on its suspension as the adaptive dampers and anti-roll bars snub down body roll, and while the ride is compliant, actual suspension travel feels limited. The fast-ratio, electric-assist steering feels awfully aggressive at times; we use the F-Type coupe’s driver-adjustable chassis tuning to dial out the heavy steering effort when the rest of the car is in Dynamic mode.
As a driver, you’re always aware that there’s a lot of power coiled within the F-type coupe, and an undercurrent of sound and vibration keeps you on alert status. The cockpit feels confined, the driver’s sight lines are troubled, and the aggressive, thinly padded sport seats are supportive but not actually comfortable. The F-type coupe is a serious sports car, not just a snappy ride to the airport. (Better pack light, because the cargo capacity of 11.0 cubic feet works out to be smaller than it looks.)

Giving it room to run

We didn’t really get comfortable with the F-type coupe until we got behind the wheel of the F-Type R. This seems crazy, since the F-Type R has a 550-hp supercharged V-8, but we were turning left onto the back straightway at the Motorland Aragon race track at the time, and the pavement ahead was as wide as a runway and almost as long, stretching into the distance a mile away. Finally, there seemed to enough room for this car to run.
It didn’t stay comfortable for long. The F-type R is such a beast that it makes even a racetrack meant to accommodate 200-mph Formula 1 cars seem daunting, and the braking markers on the long, long straightaway come up pretty fast at a little north of 150 mph (top speed is limited to 186 mph).
If you like, you can analyze your driving with information from the R-type’s electronic sensors on the 8-inch video screen on the dash, just as you’d expect in a car that’s seen plenty of development at the Nürburgring Nordschleife. Even so, we knew without looking that when you have so much car at your disposal, you don’t jump on the throttle, lay into the brakes, or yank on the wheel. Instead, you need to work as hard as you can to make smooth, deliberate transitions between inputs. This F-Type R feels heavier than its 3638 pounds, and it’s best not to make it angry.
When the surface is rainswept and slick, you’ll appreciate that a brake-type torque vectoring system helps tug the front end toward the apex of a corner, while an electric-type limited-slip differential puts down the power evenly through the rear wheels as you accelerate away. Altogether, the F-Type R is the kind of car in which you should have some clue about your intended direction of travel when you get into the gas, and a straight path is generally recommended.

This is not your mama’s Jaguar

Here in the U.S., we’ve been working with a certain image of Jaguar that has come down to us from the 1950s, when assorted advertising executives in New York City would park their XK120s on Madison Avenue. But we forget that in England, the Jaguar E-type of the 1960s was a flash car that was the choice of the bad guys who masterminded the Great Train Robbery in 1963.
So maybe we shouldn’t be surprised that the 2015 Jaguar F-type coupe is a sports car, not a grand touring car. While it’s generally civilized, the car always remains a pretty tough proposition -- a little noisy, a little uncomfortable, and a little more than you bargained for.
The miracle here is that you can have your 2015 Jaguar F-type coupe in three different trims: the $65,000 F-type with a V-6, the $77,000 F-type S with a high-performance V-6, or the $99,000 F-type R with a high-performance V-8.
Let us leave you with this thought. You know the Jaguar badge on the front of the F-Type coupe, the one known as the Growler? Well, this should be an indicator that the Jaguar guys aren’t kidding around with this car.

2015 Jaguar F-Type S Coupe

Base Price: $77,895 (including destination)
Powertrain
Engine: 3.0-liter supercharged DOHC V-6
Power: 380 hp @ 6500 rpm
Torque: 339 lb-ft @ 3500-5000 rpm
Transmission 8-speed automatic
Drive: Rear-wheel
Chassis
Steering: Electronically assisted rack-and-pinion
Front suspension: Control arms, coil springs, gas dampers, anti-roll bar
Rear suspension: Multilink, coil springs, gas dampers, anti-roll bar
Brakes (front/rear): Ventilated discs, ABS
Tires: 245/40R-19 front, 275/35R-19 rear
Measurements
L x W x H: 176.0 x 75.7 x 51.5 in
Wheelbase: 103.2 in
Track F/R: 62.8/64.9 in
Weight: 3514 lb
Cargo Volume: 11.0 cubic feet
EPA Mileage: 19/27/22 mpg (city/highway/combined)
Top Speed: 171 mph (electronically limited)
2015 Jaguar F Type Coupe Front Three Quarter
186 mph!

The numbers on the billboard are more than two feet tall. Below the triple-digit eye-catcher, set in brackets and printed too small to be deciphered from a distance, the banner ad reads "Electronically Limited."

What kind of car is this new 2015 Jaguar F-Type R Coupe? Why does a high-performance coupe need a governor to stop it from going faster than 186 mph? To prevent it from taking off like an airplane? From disintegrating at meltdown speed? From driving us dizzy on its way into orbit?
"The R is the sharpest, hottest, and most focused variation of the F-type," states Mike Cross, chief vehicle integration engineer, a.k.a. senior test driver. "The R version does everything a little better than the 495-hp convertible -- accelerate, brake, steer, change lanes, curve through cones, redefine the limit."
After a brief pause, the seasoned driftmeister adds laconically: "Okay, perhaps it doesn't set new standards in the ride department. But on the track, it certainly sifts the men from the boys after only a handful of laps."
Which is exactly why our second encounter with the ultimate hot rod from Whitley took place in sunny Spain on the Circuito de Catalunya, which will host major F1 and Moto GP events later this year. The 2.4-mile-long circuit contains the complete Fear and Loathing in Barcelona compendium: at the end of the longest straight, the speedo reads a white-knuckle 165 mph, the awe-inspiring mid-section roller-coaster corners are dotted with blind turn-in and braking points, the famous double-apex right-hander is the stuff instantaneous depressions are made of, the slow chicane before the entrance to pit lane disciplines you with ankle-high curbs and ultra-short runoff areas.
The Jaguar F-Type coupe offers a smidgen more scalp clearance than the roadster with the top erect, but it, too, is a tight fit compared with its German, Italian, Japanese, and American competition. On the credit side, we note new body-hugging bucket seats with inflatable side bolsters, g-force-defying wraparound backrests, and extended thigh support. Although the R is generally quite well equipped, you still need to pay extra for the neat glass roof, a navigation system, and such street-cred enhancing goodies as the full carbon-fiber pack and dark gray 20-inch alloy wheels. Driver assistance systems? Not at this point, and probably not for some time, since the current electronic platform would struggle to digest the flood of data that most of these radar, infrared, laser, ultrasound, or camera-based devices seem to require.
Although we have already experienced this engine in the XKR-S, XFR-S, and XJR, the supercharged V-8 sounds particularly untamed and aggressive in the Jaguar F-type, where the switchable exhaust turns every lift-off maneuver into a loud acoustic statement, Hyde Park Corner–style. The performance figures reflect the slightly more favorable curb weight of the compact two-seater: 0 to 60 mph in 4.0 seconds flat, 50 to 75 mph in 2.4 seconds (even though that exercise requires an upshift from second to third gear). While the 5.0-liter powerhouse will happily spin to its redline at 7000 rpm again and again, what you really register with a broad smile and with growing excitement is the massive maximum torque of 502 lb-ft, which crests from 2500 to 5500 rpm. As a result, full-throttle mid-range upshifts can feel suspiciously close to whiplash.
All F-type models feature the same ZF eight-speed automatic transmission, but each version has its own final drive ratio. The rear axle of the R is so short that the car storms through the first three gears like a hurricane on wheels. Even though the transmission responds quickly to throttle inputs when in the regular Drive setting, it is invariably more involving to change gears with your fingertips. In Sport mode, the fast-acting torque converter feels every bit as efficient as a good dual-clutch transmission. One of these days, Jaguar will introduce all-wheel drive to the F-type, but right now we depend on the familiar blend of Pirelli licorice, traction control on alert, and a superfast limited-slip differential that can switch from open to locked in less than 200 milliseconds.
With warm tires and on dry blacktop, take-off often is a brief and shrill shouting match, but as soon as the first raindrops fall, the chip-controlled guardian angels work overtime by means of diligent torque distribution (between the rear wheels) and cautiously dosed torque vectoring (by momentarily decelerating those two wheels that are closest to the apex). Although it is possible to spice up the engine, transmission, steering, and dampers via the dynamic mode selector, those who prefer grand gestures will want to adjust the dynamic stability control (DSC) calibration. One stab at the button permits drift angles of up to 30 degrees, which doesn't sound like much but looks fab. Keep the button pushed for more than five seconds, and a gong will sound to announce that the car is now skating on very thin ice. With DSC off, the F-Type R is ready to go through the entire hooligan spectrum, from livid street painting to smelly, slide-n-smoke antics.
The R has the quickest steering ever fitted to a production-model Jaguar, blending spontaneous turn-in with delicate weighting and low effort. Having said that, the direction finder could still do with a bit more self-centering, a bit more concentration around the straight-ahead position, and a bit more feedback when held on (opposite) lock. Extra money buys extra-large carbon-ceramic disc brakes, which promise even faster response, stronger deceleration, and less wear. In addition, the pedal pressure allegedly never varies, and the system is claimed to be immune to extreme working temperatures. On the racetrack, the lightweight CCM rotors may indeed gain a tenth here and there, but for everyday use the steel brakes suffice. We compared the two applications and found that they both suffered from some at-the-limit judder and pronounced tramlining, and they both required the driver to really hammer the pedal for that final make-it-or-dive-straight-on effort.
Tipping the scales at 3671 pounds, the F-Type R is lighter and significantly stiffer than the open-top version. The cargo space has increased from nearly useless to 11.0 cubic feet. Despite the earlier remark by Mike Cross, the 550-hp coupe actually rides with a charming mix of casual compliance and occasional grumpiness. Despite the fat 20-inch ultra-high-performance tires, the adaptive dampers, and the marginally stiffer springs, directional stability does not always follow the line drawn by a ruler. What the F-type really hates with a vengeance are mid-corner bumps, surface variations, and ridges and potholes.
We are not sure whether the top-of-the-line F-type is really worth five figures more than the base 340-hp model with big brakes and 19-inch tires. But we know that putting the 550-hp Jag through its paces is a serious challenge, so be careful with that DSC button because, unlike some cats, no human being has seven lives.
On sale: Spring 2014
Price: $99,895
Engine: 5.0L supercharged V-8, 550 hp, 502 lb-ft
Drive: Rear wheel
2015 Jaguar F-Type
2015 Jaguar F-Type

New for 2015

The Jaguar F-Type remains largely unchanged for the 2015 model year, but an F-Type Coupe is introduced, which allows Jaguar to compete more directly with Porsche 911s and Chevrolet Corvettes. The F-Type Coupe is powered by the same V-6 and V-8 engines as the convertible, but adds a new high performance F-Type R that increases the output of the supercharged V-8 to 550 hp.

Vehicle Overview

The Jaguar F-Type marks the return of a sports car to the automaker, one it’s needed for years. Available as a coupe and convertible, the F-Type is reminiscent of the classic E-Type, but with its own modern flair, and comes equipped with one of the best exhaust notes to come straight from any automaker's factory. Once the XK coupe and convertible are discontinued after the 2015 model year, the F-Type continues as Jaguar’s sole sporty two-door.

Summary

The 2015 Jaguar F-Type is a rear-drive sports car, available in coupe or convertible forms, and with a quartet of engines that send their power through a ZF eight-speed automatic. The base engine is a supercharged 3.0-liter V-6 that’s available at two output levels, for F-Type and F-Type S models. The standard engine makes 340 hp and 332 lb-ft of torque, while the S models produce 380 hp and 339 lb-ft of torque. Each level of performance receives its own unique final drive ratio (3.15:1 standard, and 3.31:1 on S models), making performance distinct on each model, while retaining an intoxicating exhaust note. EPA-estimated fuel efficiency is 20/28 mpg (city/highway) for base models, and 19/27 mpg for S models.
Like the V-6, the available supercharged 5.0-liter V-8 is available in two different power levels, with the F-Type S V-8 Convertible making 495 hp and 460 lb-ft of torque, and the F-Type R Coupe making 550 hp and 502 lb-ft of torque. EPA-estimated fuel economy is an identical 16/23 mpg.
The 2015 F-Type's convertible top can be raised or lowered in 12 seconds at speeds up to 30 mph. Notable features on the F-Type include HID headlights, adaptive front lighting (with automatic high beams), a powered rear hatch on the coupe, an active rear spoiler (raises above 60 mph on convertible and 70 mph on coupe), configurable driving dynamics, an eight-inch infotainment screen, active center air vents (they raise when needed and stay hidden otherwise), customizable interior lighting, blind spot monitoring, a closing vehicle sensor (if a vehicle is approaching quickly from behind at speed that might make lane changes more dangerous), and a dynamic stability control system.
The 2015 Jaguar F-Type has not been evaluated by the NHTSA or the IIHS.

What We Think

We’re not kidding when we say the 2015 Jaguar F-Type has one of the best exhaust notes available straight out of a showroom, regardless of engine choice. The selectable active exhaust option is a box we checked on our Four Seasons 2015 Jaguar F-Type S Coupe, an option that “opens bypass valves in the exhaust under hard acceleration. The sweet mechanical music that follows, especially the crackle and pop when you lift off the gas, are worthy of an Italian supercar.” This is standard on V-6 S, V-8 S, and R models. We’ve heard more artificial exhaust notes piped through speaker systems this year than we’d care to admit, but the Jaguar is pure, unsynthesized, goodness.
The F-Type isn’t all aural enjoyment, however, as it has the handling chops to back up the soundtrack. In a Driven Review of a 2015 Jaguar F-Type Coupe we noted that, “when the surface is rainswept and slick, you’ll appreciate that a brake-type torque vectoring system helps tug the front end toward the apex of a corner, while an electric-type limited-slip differential puts down the power evenly through the rear wheels as you accelerate away.” Handling was excellent, and in our Driven Review of a 2015 Type R Coupe we said “the R has the quickest steering ever fitted to a production-model Jaguar, blending spontaneous turn-in with delicate weighting and low effort. Having said that, the direction finder could still do with a bit more self-centering, a bit more concentration around the straight-ahead position, and a bit more feedback when held on (opposite) lock.”
The F-Type marks a turning point for the brand as it attempts to lure more than a few people from the German cars they’re used to. If you’re dying for AWD or a manual transmission, you only have to wait for the 2016 model, though both new features won't be available together: V-6 cars will get a stick-shift option, and V-8 cars will get AWD standard.
The 2015 Jaguar F-Type coupe is a sports car, not a grand touring car. While it’s generally civilized, the car always remains a pretty tough proposition -- a little noisy, a little uncomfortable, and a little more than you bargained for.

You’ll Like

  • Selectable Active Exhaust
  • Available 550-hp supercharged V-8
  • Beautiful styling

You Won’t Like

  • Getting speeding tickets
  • Uncomfortable seats
  • Small trunk in coupe, even smaller in convertible

Key Competitors

  • Porsche 911
  • BMW M4
  • Audi TTS
  • Chevrolet Corvette
  • Alfa Romeo 4C

Rating

4
2015 Jaguar F Type S Coupe Front Three Quarter 02
What’s that about pride coming before a fall? Not long after we gloated about the reliability of our 2015 Jaguar F-Type S coupe -- at least compared to our ailing Corvette -- it began to exhibit a couple small problems. While the flaws were annoying, none left us stranded, and none hampered our love for the F-Type.
Jaguar F Type Coupe R Bloodhound Parachute Front Three Quarters
As the speed freaks behind the forthcoming Bloodhound SSC ramp up to shatter the 1,000 mph land speed barrier, Jaguar is helping the team test vital equipment and safety systems for the record car. Lucky for us, the Bloodhound team recorded a video of a Jaguar F-Type Coupe R testing the safety parachute deployment system that will help slow the car down from its 1,000-mph top speed.

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2015 Jaguar F-Type
2015 Jaguar F-Type
Base RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
20 MPG City | 28 MPG Hwy
rank
4
2015 BMW M4
Base RWD 2-Dr Coupe I6
17 MPG City | 26 MPG Hwy
rank
5
rank
17
2015 Jaguar F-Type
2015 Jaguar F-Type
Base RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
$65,000
Top Ranking Vehicles - Price
rank
8
2015 Jaguar F-Type
2015 Jaguar F-Type
Base RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
340hp
Top Ranking Vehicles - Horsepower

2015 Jaguar F-Type Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
3.0L V6Engine
Fuel economy City:
20 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
28 MPG
Horsepower:
340 hp @ 6500rpm
Torque:
332 ft lb of torque @ 3500rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player (optional)
  • CD Changer
  • DVD
  • Navigation
Vehicle
Unlimited miles / 36 months
Powertrain
Unlimited miles / 36 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 72 months
Roadside
Unlimited miles / 36 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
ENGINE AND ENGINE COOLING:ENGINE:GASOLINE:BELTS AND ASSOCIATED PULLEYS
Summary
Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC (Jaguar) is recalling certain F-TYPE vehicles manufactured August 25, 2014, to September 12, 2014, 2015 XF vehicles manufactured September 3, 2014, to September 12, 2014, and 2015 XJ vehicles manufactured August 21, 2014, to September 11, 2014. In the affected vehicles, the Front End Accessory Drive (FEAD) belt, Power Assisted Steering (PAS) pump pulley and/or battery positive cable at the alternator may detach.
Consequences
If the battery positive cable loosens, an electrical short may result, increasing the risk of a fire. If the FEAD belt looses or detaches, the vehicle may lose power assisted steering, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Jaguar has notified owners, and dealers will inspect the affected engine mounted components for the proper threading and torque, correcting them as necessary, free of charge. The recall began November 10, 2014. Owners may contact Jaguar customer service at 1-800-452-4827. Jaguar's number for this recall is J044.
Potential Units Affected
272
Notes
Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:ALTERNATOR/GENERATOR/REGULATOR
Summary
Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC (Jaguar) is recalling certain F-TYPE vehicles manufactured August 25, 2014, to September 12, 2014, 2015 XF vehicles manufactured September 3, 2014, to September 12, 2014, and 2015 XJ vehicles manufactured August 21, 2014, to September 11, 2014. In the affected vehicles, the Front End Accessory Drive (FEAD) belt, Power Assisted Steering (PAS) pump pulley and/or battery positive cable at the alternator may detach.
Consequences
If the battery positive cable loosens, an electrical short may result, increasing the risk of a fire. If the FEAD belt looses or detaches, the vehicle may lose power assisted steering, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Jaguar has notified owners, and dealers will inspect the affected engine mounted components for the proper threading and torque, correcting them as necessary, free of charge. The recall began November 10, 2014. Owners may contact Jaguar customer service at 1-800-452-4827. Jaguar's number for this recall is J044.
Potential Units Affected
272
Notes
Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:41
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:WIRING
Summary
Jaguar Land Rover North America LLC (Jaguar) is recalling certain model year 2014-2015 F-TYPE vehicles manufactured August 31, 2012, to October 22, 2014. In the affected vehicles the seatbelt harness connector which connects the Seatbelt Tension Sensor (STS) to the Occupant Classification Sensor Control Module (OCSCM) may not have been correctly wired. The OCSCM senses whether there is an occupant in the front passenger seating position, and the STS senses whether tension on the seatbelt indicates a child restraint is being used in the front passenger seating position. Both sensors provide information to the restraint control module (RCM) which informs whether the front passenger airbag should be activated, depending on whether the sensors detect the seat is occupied and/or that it is occupied by an adult passenger.
Consequences
Should the STS not have been wired correctly, the front passenger air bag may not be suppressed, and may remain activated, even when a child restraint is placed in the front passenger seat or a small statured adult occupies that seat. In the event of a crash necessitating deployment of the front passenger air bag, a child or small stature occupant may be at an increased risk of injury.
Remedy
Jaguar will notify owners, and dealers will correct the harness connector wire configuration, free of charge. The recall began on December 3, 2014. Owners may contact Jaguar customer service at 1-800-452-4827. Jaguar's number for this recall is J047.
Potential Units Affected
7,079
Notes
Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC


IIHS Front Small Overlap
N/R
NHTSA Rating Front Driver
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Front Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Overall
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rollover
Not Rated
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
N/R
IIHS Overall Side Crash
N/R
IIHS Rear Crash
N/R
IIHS Roof Strength
N/R

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2015 Jaguar F-Type

Depreciation
54.9%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$41,888
54.9%
Insurance
$11,740
15.4%
Fuel Cost
$11,242
14.7%
Financing
$6,609
8.7%
Maintenance
$2,483
3.3%
Repair Costs
$1,676
2.2%
State Fees
$603
0.8%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $76,241 What's This?
Value Rating: Poor