2015 Hyundai Genesis

3.8 RWD 4-Dr Sedan V6 auto trans

2015 hyundai genesis Reviews and News

2015 Chrysler 300 V6 AWD Vs 2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD Moving 7
With today’s luxury shoppers moving toward crossovers, SUVs, and even pickup trucks, traditional three-box sedans such as the 2015 Hyundai Genesis and 2015 Chrysler 300 are starting to seem like relics of bygone years. But even though they might not be as practical as do-it-all Cadillac Escalades and Lexus RXs, the best luxury sedans can still achieve a level of elegance that crossovers can’t match.
Daily news editor Jake Holmes and I set out on a drive through rural Michigan in these two four-doors to see which one is better able to achieve this ideal and make a case for the luxury sedan’s persistence in the market. Both Chrysler and Hyundai still offer the old-school combination of rear-wheel drive and V-8 power, but only 20 percent of 300 buyers and 10 percent of Genesis buyers choose the eight-cylinder engine. We instead tested the V-6-powered, all-wheel-drive versions that you’re much more likely to see on the road.
2015 Chrysler 300 V6 AWD Vs 2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD Static 7

Taking stock

Our two examples, the 2015 Chrysler 300 S AWD and 2015 Hyundai Genesis 3.8 HTRAC, are closely matched on paper, even if you might not think that these two cars are direct competitors. The $48,745 Chrysler and the $52,450 Hyundai are separated by just 11 horsepower, 2 inches in length, and 60 pounds in curb weight. Despite the similar numbers, you’ll never mistake one for the other in a parking lot.
The Chrysler 300’s familiar look has aged well since the original 300 arrived in 2005, and our car’s sport-oriented S package offered some sharp-looking details including dark-finish wheels, a black roof, and attractive red paint. Holmes praises the car’s refresh for 2015, saying that the 300 hasn’t lost any of its attitude over the years: “I have always liked the way the 300 looked, and this car has a bold presence about it.” Indeed, its brash style statement makes a distinct impression and gives the 300 a well-defined identity that’s uniquely American.
2015 Chrysler 300 V6 AWD 4
Though the Genesis’ design may be more derivative than the Chrysler’s, this second generation of Hyundai’s luxury car is starting to come into its own. The strong face and prominent grille combine with clean, flowing lines along the profile to make for a modern luxury sedan that looks fresh on the road, if a bit generic overall. In some ways, this anonymity almost seems intentional: There aren’t any Hyundai badges to be found, and certain touches such as the lighting elements and side surfacing are cribbed from BMW, Lexus, and others. But we can get behind the idea of mash-ups, especially when the result is as nice as the Genesis sedan’s handsome, convincingly premium design.
2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD 11

Settling in

We hop inside the two cars, with Holmes in the Genesis and me in the 300, and head for the freeway. I am immediately impressed with the smooth shifting of the Chrysler’s eight-speed automatic, which pairs well with the 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6. The exhaust note is sporty as I get into the throttle on the on-ramp, but the 300 is happy to settle down into a quiet, comfortable cruise around 75 mph, with well-controlled body motions and a planted demeanor.
Holmes compliments the Hyundai’s elegant matte wood trim and tasteful use of chrome. He isn’t as thrilled with some of the other interior plastics, which don’t feel too different from the grained materials found in a Sonata that costs half as much. On a more positive note, the Genesis’ infotainment system has clear graphics and mimics Audi’s well-sorted MMI controller with an easy-to-use dial on the center console. I fiddle around with the 2015 Chrysler 300’s Uconnect touchscreen and am reminded that it’s also one of the better interfaces on the market, with big buttons, quick responses, and a clearly laid-out menu structure.
2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD 34
We exit the highway, transition to surface streets, and switch cars. As I get started from a stop in the Genesis, I notice a big difference in the Hyundai’s throttle tip-in, which is much smoother than the 300’s more aggressive setup. Holmes agrees and compares the Hyundai’s throttle mapping to a Mercedes-Benz E-Class. Though the 2015 Hyundai Genesis’ significantly quieter engine note means that you’re more isolated from the sensation of speed, its gearing makes for smoother and more responsive acceleration than the Chrysler, which can sometimes get caught flat-footed when you step on it. Of course, the Hyundai’s 3.8-liter V-6 has an edge of 0.2 liter and 11 more hp and 29 lb-ft of torque compared with the Chrysler’s 3.6-liter, which helps explain the Korean sedan’s more prodigious thrust.
2015 Chrysler 300 V6 AWD Vs 2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD Moving 1

Upping the pace

Neither of these cars is a sport sedan, but both are willing to hustle a bit as we reach curvier back roads. The Chrysler is the more engaging of the pair, with a hearty growl from its V-6 under hard acceleration. Its steering, though lighter than the Hyundai’s, also provides more feedback, letting us feel out the road’s imperfections as the 300 takes a confident set in some longer, sweeping corners.
Though the Hyundai’s steering and brakes feel more silky and isolated, it too is solid and composed through these twisties. The Genesis also drives smaller than the Chrysler thanks to clear visibility all around and a more natural driving position. We switch cars again and Holmes quickly notices a refreshing change in the Genesis. “Wow, I can actually see out of this car,” he says. Indeed, the 300’s retro, chop-top look makes for a high beltline and a constricted view out the front and sides. Both of us are more confident in the Hyundai, where huge windows and a low dashboard make it easy to place the car where we want it to go. The 300 might be a bit more “fun” in the traditional sense, but the Genesis is at once more satisfying to drive and more luxurious.
2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD 18
After switching back and forth between the two sedans, Holmes also changes his tune on the Hyundai’s interior. Though he had criticized the Genesis’ plastics earlier, the 300’s dark cabin looks and feels even more drab and dated in comparison. “Can we break up the black plastic everywhere, please?” he remarks, noting that the switches and knobs in this pricey 300 can be found in $20,000 Dodge and Jeep models. We can’t help but think that the 300 barely feels any nicer inside than its mainstream stable mate, the Dodge Charger, while the Hyundai’s nicer switchgear, softer leather, and attractive trim pieces fall much closer to Audi and Lexus in terms of perceived quality.
2015 Chrysler 300 V6 AWD 34

Choosing a winner

This difference in aesthetics and feel is an important one, especially when considering two cars from non-luxury brands that still carry premium prices. With its smooth powertrain, classy styling, and credibly upscale interior, the 2015 Hyundai Genesis achieves the sort of elegance and poise expected in a modern luxury sedan. And though the 2015 Chrysler 300 still has a unique appeal of its own, its age is evident in its compromises, namely its reduced visibility, interior quality, and overall refinement.
After wrapping up a day of driving, we pull into a parking lot to exchange closing thoughts and pick a winner. When I ask which car he’d like to take home for the weekend, Holmes doesn’t hesitate before choosing the Genesis. I settle for the Chrysler, and feel a bit slighted on the drive home. It’s as clear a disparity as any, and reaffirms our preference for the 2015 Hyundai Genesis. Though it’s only the second generation of Hyundai’s ambitious premium sedan, the well-rounded, satisfying 2015 Genesis is a truly impressive vehicle that we’d happily drive every day.
2015 Chrysler 300 V6 AWD Vs 2015 Hyundai Genesis V6 AWD Static 5

2015 Chrysler 300 S AWD Specifications

On Sale: Now
As-Tested Price: $48,745
Engine: 3.6L DOHC 24-valve V-6/300 hp @ 6,350 rpm, 264 lb-ft @ 4,800 rpm
Transmission: 8-speed automatic
Layout: 4-door, 5-passenger, front-engine, AWD sedan
EPA Mileage: 18/27 mpg city/highway
L x W x H: 198.6 x 75.0 x 59.2 in
Wheelbase: 120.2 in
Weight: 4,235 lb

2015 Hyundai Genesis 3.8 HTRAC Specifications

On Sale: Now
As-Tested Price: $52,450
Engine: 3.8L DOHC 24-valve V-6/311 hp @ 6,000 rpm, 293 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm
Transmission: 8-speed automatic
Layout: 4-door, 5-passenger, front-engine, AWD sedan
EPA Mileage: 16/25 mpg city/highway
L x W x H: 196.5 x 74.4 x 58.3 in
Wheelbase: 118.5 in
Weight: 4,295 lb
2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan Front View Parked
Scottsdale, Arizona—Before the 2015 Hyundai Genesis, we had grown accustomed to every automaker recounting the arduous struggle to make its latest-generation car lighter, more efficient, and as slippery as a basket of eels. This narrative happens to be as stimulating as a lecture on photosynthesis. The strategic use of hot-formed, high-strength steel and magnesium castings is exactly what we dream about at night once our mind has entertained itself with odd stories about carbon dioxide diffusion and sucrose accumulation.
Our introduction to the 2015 Hyundai Genesis included none of it. Instead, Hyundai executives spoke about giving the sedan more visual presence and greater substance. They invoked “cab-to-axle proportion,” the “wide, expansive” dash, overall roominess, and reduced racket. Yes, the topic of high-strength steel did come up, but only in relation to improved crashworthiness. Otherwise, the remaining emphasis was placed on the sedan’s technological content, which starts with a 9.2-inch LCD screen. And, of course, there’s the value equation that is synonymous with Hyundai.
The ’15 Genesis rides on an all-new platform that sees the wheelbase increased by 2.9 inches to 118.5 inches and an overall length that is only fractionally longer. “When we saw the package that came through, we were like: ‘Is this for real?’” design manager John Krsteski said. “That we could pull the cabin that far back and create that classic proportion” was a special opportunity. The sedan is 196.5 inches long, 74.4 inches wide, and 58.3 inches tall. Interior volume encompasses 107.7 cubic feet.
The fresh sheetmetal makes the outgoing model seem as stiff and primitive as early talking pictures. Despite the crisp, sleek lines, the first thing we noticed was the new model’s large, six-bladed, single-frame hexagonal grille. Whereas the first Genesis used a knockoff Mercedes-Benz countenance, we glimpsed the accumulation of conservatively colored test cars parked together in a secondary lot at The Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain and wondered, “What are Ford Fusions doing here?”
It was only a momentary, if reasonable, lapse. Nothing else about the two cars is similar. With its long hood and arching back, the Genesis could be from the House of Windsor. While we recognized no stylistic breakthrough, we nevertheless saw thoroughbreds instead of paint ponies during the next morning’s walkaround. Gracefulness typifies the Genesis, from how the front air intakes don’t gape to how the rear glass touches down as far back as possible without compromising the trunk’s usability. “This being a premium vehicle, we didn’t want to present a traditional three-box design,” Krsteski said.

A refined powertrain in either of two flavors

As before, there are two engines: the standard direct-injection 3.8-liter DOHC V-6 making 311 hp and 293 lb-ft of torque and the optional direct-injection 5.0-liter DOHC V-8 making 420 hp and 383 lb-ft (on premium fuel). Issuing a mellow, tenor-voiced report, the V-6 is more than adequate. Vociferating with bellicosity, the V-8 will kick some ass. An electronically controlled eight-speed automatic transmission is included with either powerplant, and paddle shifters are standard.
To distinguish between models, look closely at the alloy wheels. The delicate, paired spokes interlaced with a five-stemmed star indicate 18-inch rims and the V-6 (base price: $38,950). The elements of each 19-incher, while similarly themed, flow and undulate with greater exaggeration. One note we would appreciate on the V-8, which starts at $52,450 (both models have increased in price), is chrome door handles instead of body-colored ones. But that’s just us.
Neither hands nor feet are required for what Hyundai claims is the world’s first limb-free automatic trunk lid opener. No swish of foot or hand is required: only proximity within a few feet -- lasting longer than three seconds -- when the smart key is on one’s person. Likewise, another world’s-first claim is made for the CO2 control system. Developed after a Korean engineer found himself drowsing on the homeward drive, the system uses a sensor located under the glove box to monitor CO2 buildup. At 2000 parts per million, the cabin is automatically ventilated with fresh air.

Hyundai’s huffing and puffing is valid

Sweetly riding even on low-profile Kumho tires yet showing a hint of sportiness, the Genesis is such a pleasant and nice sedan, we have to ask why Buick didn’t have one just like it ten or even fifteen years ago. It’s comfortable and quiet, lovely inside, and important-looking outside. One of the few things we can fault it for is the lack of a rich smell with the V-8’s standard “Ultra Leather” upholstery. (But the ventilated seats were a boon on the long run down the Beeline Highway when returning to Scottsdale.)
Other available features include all-wheel drive with the V-6, a superb head-up display, and parking assistance. Lane departure and blind-spot detection cause the steering wheel to vibrate when you stray. The haptic response can be dialed down to a minimum level of intrusiveness or even shut off altogether. Meanwhile, the driver may choose among four modes of proceeding: eco, normal, sport, and snow.
In all, the 2015 Hyundai Genesis makes a persuasive argument to the buyer who disdains ostentation and appreciates value. The Genesis had been pushing the 20,000-unit sales barrier, but even better results can be expected. “We’re planning on selling a pretty good volume of this car,” product planning chief Mike O’Brien said, explaining how the development costs would also be recaptured as “know-how for the future” throughout the Hyundai lineup.
As a biologist might admit, there’s nothing sexy in basic processes. Yet as with capturing sunlight and carbon dioxide and producing oxygen as a byproduct, the result sure is nice.

2015 Hyundai Genesis

Base Price: $38,950/$52,450 (V-6/V-8)
Price As Tested: $49,950/$55,700 (V-6/V-8, including destination)
Powertrain
Engine: 5.0-liter DOHC V-8
Power: 420 hp @ 6000 rpm (est.)
Torque: 383 lb-ft @ 5000 rpm (est.)
Transmission 8-speed automatic
Drive: Rear- or all-wheel
Chassis
Steering: Electronically assisted rack-and-pinion
Front suspension: Multilink, coil springs, gas shocks, anti-roll bar
Rear suspension: Multilink, coil springs, gas shocks, stabilizer bar
Brakes (front/rear): Ventilated disc/solid disc, ABS
Tires: 245/45R-18 (V-6), 245/40R-19 and 275/35R-19 (V-8)
Measurements
L x W x H: 196.5 x 74.4 x 58.3 in
Wheelbase: 118.5 in
Track F/R: 64.1/65.3 in (18-inch tires), 63.8/64.3 in (19-inch tires)
Weight: 4138-4521 lb
Passenger Volume 107.7 cu ft
Cargo Volume: 15.3 cu ft
EPA Mileage: 18/29 mpg (V-6), 16/25 mpg (V-6 AWD), 15/23 mpg (V-8)
2015 Hyundai Genesis Front Three Quarter
Namyang, South Korea -- Five years ago, Hyundai launched its first luxury car, the Genesis. Few car names have been so fitting, because the Genesis truly was the beginning of a change in perception and market reach for the Korean automaker. At the time, we said that Hyundai had “taken off its gloves,” launching a “no-holds-barred assault” on the luxury market with a car that was surprisingly impressive. The 2009 Genesis was a commendable effort complete with a powerful V-8 and rear-wheel drive—an ambitious feat for any car company, let alone one that had never done a premium vehicle of any kind in its then 41-year existence.

Back to Namyang

Now its time for round two, and we’ve returned to Namyang, South Korea, home of Hyundai’s massive research and design center, to test the 2015 Hyundai Genesis on the same banked oval and the same sweeping road course where we drove its predecessor. The automaker defied critics just by making an award-winning luxury car on the first try, but Hyundai doesn’t want to simply be in the luxury segment, it wants to compete with BMW, Mercedes, Lexus, and Cadillac, and that meant major changes for the 2015 Hyundai Genesis. Inside and out, it’s a new car. While the powertrain carries over, almost everything else, from the design to the mechanicals (including all-wheel drive), is significantly different and better.
“We feel that this will be a defining car for our brand for the next five years,” says Casey Hyun, Hyundai creative design manager.

Creating an identity

The makeover of the 2015 Hyundai Genesis starts with the design, now called Fluidic Sculpture 2.0. While the first Genesis drew comparisons to Mercedes and Lexus sedans, it was actually a backhanded compliment. In 2008, no one knew what a Hyundai luxury car was supposed to look like, and the Genesis lacked a distinct identity. When you’re trying to build a luxury image and the average man on the street looks at the car and doesn’t know it’s a Hyundai, that’s a problem.
“We were trying to find our own direction, our own unique way of designing cars, and I think now it’s evident,” Hyun says.
Indeed. The 2015 Hyundai Genesis has a prominent, distinctive hexagonal grille that will be used across the Hyundai lineup. It’s framed by big LED lights set in large frames that stretch from the grille to far back in the fenders. There’s a bit of chrome to accent the greenhouse, but it’s brushed rather than shiny. Hyundai designers did not want to convey luxury in a showy, new-money fashion; instead, they chose to act like they’ve been here before. In fact, they have. Smart move.
The 2015 Hyundai Genesis has a classic rear-wheel-drive layout, with a long hood and a short deck. There are dramatic lines and creases on the sides that run the length of the car, and the roofline is more noticeably raked than before, almost fastback style. The Genesis does still look vaguely like a BMW, but the new design language provides Hyundai a legitimate look to call its own.
“No longer will people have any doubt,” Hyun says.

Details count

The cabin is similarly updated and distinctive. It was nice before, but the Genesis still felt pedestrian in comparison with other luxury sedans. It had plenty of features, but the design was a mish-mash and some of the details were just average. The 2015 car has a totally different vibe. It’s much more aspirational and makes use of real wood—such as bamboo, ash, oak, and walnut—which works in harmony with real aluminum and napa leather. The effect is something more akin to a purposefully put-together Mercedes than a Hyundai playing dress-up.
“We have learned a lot, and that is why we paid a lot of attention to detail,” says Yongseok Lee, overseas product planner for Hyundai.
He’s serious. Designers obsessed so much over the interior that the seats have three different levels of cushioning to contour to the various parts of your body. Even the switches to adjust the seats have been reconfigured so they’re easier to use. In what is believed to be a world first, the Genesis has a carbon-dioxide monitor that senses respiration levels in a bid to detect drowsiness. There are also beefed-up electronics, including a head-up display, an optional 9.2-inch high-definition touchscreen, and a hands-free trunk opening function. The technology enhancements extend to the safety features: there is an automatic emergency braking system and a lane keeping assist system, and the sedan is now designed to pass the IIHS small overlap crash test.
The Genesis grows 0.2 inch in length, but the wheelbase is 3 inches longer, making for different proportions and much more room in the rear seat. Plus, there are head cutouts in back to compensate for the steep roofline. At 196.5 inches long, the 2015 Genesis is bigger than the BMW 5-series and Mercedes-Benz E-class.

A new platform

Another significant change to the 2015 Hyundai Genesis is the addition of all-wheel drive. It will be available at launch this spring (likely in April) and instantly makes Hyundai more competitive in colder climates. The system, called HTRAC, was developed with Magna Powertrain, the supplier of BMW’s xDrive. HTRAC has an electronic transfer case with a multiplate clutch that actively controls torque distribution, allowing 90 percent of the torque to go to the front wheels in extreme situations.
The under-the-skin changes continue with a new platform, which reinforces the notion that the 2015 model is really a new generation. Hyundai uses more ultra-high-strength steel for the new car (52 percent vs. 14 percent), resulting in improved torsional stiffness. The rear multi-link suspension is updated and is claimed to be stiffer than the suspensions in the 5-series and the E-class. The steering is also revised; the Genesis is the first Hyundai to get a new rack-mounted, motor-driven electric power steering setup with a variable gear ratio. It adds stability at high speeds and improves response at lower speeds.
All of these changes are a lot to consider as we’re hitting 135 mph on Hyundai’s high-speed test oval. Our rear-wheel-drive, V-6 Genesis is composed as we navigate the top line of the track, blast through corners, and then mash the throttle on the open straights into the fading autumn sun. It’s a short but invigorating couple of laps in this big, fast, buttoned-down car.
We switch to a V-8, all-wheel-drive model for the handling course. The Genesis is a willing partner as we try to keep a smooth line and generate as much speed as possible on the brief straightaways. The AWD system adds stability, and the new steering system is an upgrade. The car goes where it is directed. Hyundai lightly tosses out the notion of the Genesis as a sport sedan, but this big car doesn’t fit that category from a dynamics standpoint even with its tauter, more athletic underpinnings. The last Genesis was knocked for being floaty, and the chassis updates have tightened up the ride. The sportiest aspects of this car are the V-6 and V-8 powerplants. They are excellent engines and work effectively with the eight-speed automatic transmission. Hyundai wouldn’t specify power ratings, but they are not expected to change much; better low-end torque, however, should make for quicker sprints to 60 mph.
The original Genesis grabbed our attention, as it was Hyundai’s first foray into the luxury arena. The 2015 Hyundai Genesis no longer seems so revolutionary. It has the polish and refinement of a second effort, but it doesn’t startle us the way its predecessor did. In a way, that’s a testament to the first car’s success—the idea of a luxury car from Hyundai no longer seems so novel.

2015 Hyundai Genesis

On Sale: Spring 2014
Base Price: N/A
Powertrain
Engine: 3.8-liter DOHC V-6, 5.0-liter DOHC V-8
Horsepower: 333 hp @ 6400 rpm, 429 hp @ 6400 rpm (V-6, V-8, estimated)
Torque: 291 lb-ft @ 5100, 376 lb-ft @ 5000 (V-6, V-8, estimated)
Transmission: Eight-speed automatic
Drive: Rear-wheel, all-wheel
Measurements
L x W x H: 196.5 in x 74.4 in x 58.3 in
2015 Hyundai Genesis
2015 Hyundai Genesis

New for 2015

The Hyundai Genesis is all-new for the 2015 model year, but the engine and transmission carry over with a few revisions. The Genesis also marks the first use of Hyundai’s new Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 design language. One of the largest notable additions compared to the last-generation Genesis luxury sedan is available all-wheel drive on the V-6.

Vehicle Overview

The Genesis is Hyundai’s rear-drive large luxury sedan slotting in above the Azera and below the flagship Equus in the automaker’s sedan lineup. The Genesis Coupe, a separate model that shares a name with the sedan, is a non-luxury rear-drive model that competes with the non-V-8 Mustangs and Camaros.

Summary

The redesigned 2015 Hyundai Genesis improves on what made the first Genesis good while widening appeal. All-wheel drive is now available on V-6 models with a system called HTRAC that was designed with the help of Magna Powertrain, the company that supplies BMW’s xDrive system. Both engines have slightly less horsepower than the previous model, but more torque. Also, power figures come lower in the rev range, which translates into a better driving experience; both engines retain the same eight-speed automatic with paddle shifters. The 3.8-liter V-6 makes 311 hp and 293 lb-ft of torque and EPA-estimated fuel economy is 18/29 mpg city/highway with RWD, or 16/25 mpg with AWD. Stepping up to the available 420-hp 5.0-liter V-8 that makes 383 lb-ft of torque (on premium fuel for both figures) gets buyers an EPA-estimated 15/23 mpg.
Some of the most notable features on the 2015 Genesis include a head-up display that can project speed, navigation, and blind spot monitoring information onto the windshield; parking assistance (sensors signal distance with audible tones for the front and rear); haptic (vibration) response in the steering wheel for lane departure and blind-spot detection; heated and cooled leather seats; an automatic trunk lid opener that opens as you approach the rear of the car; a 9.2-inch infotainment screen; and a CO2 control system, which automatically ventilates the cabin when CO2 buildup reached 2000 parts per million, to keep drivers from becoming drowsy due to oxygen deprivation.
The 2015 Hyundai Genesis received a five-star overall safety rating from the NHTSA (out of a possible five stars), and is considered a 2014 Top Safety Pick+ by the IIHS.

What We Think

The 2015 Hyundai Genesis has been executed in a way that is “more akin to a purposefully put-together Mercedes than a Hyundai playing dress-up.” The Hyundai engineers have beautifully crafted the interior, using real wood – such as bamboo, ash, oak, and walnut – in conjunction with real aluminum and Nappa leather. Seat switches have been redesigned with an eye toward ease of use, and three different levels of cushioning contour to the different parts of the body.
What’s the story with the CO2 monitor, though? Apparently a Hyundai engineer became drowsy on the way home and thought up what is believed to be the first automotive application of the technology to automatically ventilate the cabin with fresh air when CO2 levels reach a certain point. Technology aside, the powertrain and handling revisions have rectified our handling complaints with the previous generation. The new Genesis has a tight and balanced ride, and the upgraded steering keeps the car on track well.
The original Genesis grabbed our attention, as it was Hyundai’s first foray into the luxury arena. The 2015 Hyundai Genesis no longer seems so revolutionary. It has the polish and refinement of a second effort, but it doesn’t startle us the way its predecessor did. In a way, that’s a testament to the first car’s success—the idea of a luxury car from Hyundai no longer seems so novel.
You’ll Like
  • The redesigned interior
  • No-touch automatic trunk opening feature
  • Not falling asleep while driving on account of too much CO2 in the cabin
You Won’t Like
  • No AWD on the V-8 model
  • Poor fuel economy on V-8 and V-6 AWD
  • Polarizing front grille design
Key Competitors
  • BMW 5 Series
  • Mercedes Benz E-Class
  • Cadillac CTS
  • Lexus GS

Rating

4
2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan Grille Headlights
Hyundai is considering a full-size luxury SUV based on the rear-drive Hyundai Genesis sedan, Reuters reports. If it reaches production, the Genesis-based luxury SUV would give the automaker a premium model to compete in the full-size SUV segment popular in the U.S. market.
Hyundai Genesis In Delamar Dry Lake Nevada Screenshot
Hyundai has come up with some clever ideas to promote the new Genesis sedan. Last year, a wild video had stunt drivers leap out of Genesis cars to demonstrate the luxury sedan's self-driving features, and now, a new campaign shows the model drawing messages to astronauts in space.
American Hustle 3
As the inexorable march toward eco-friendliness continues, our beloved V-8 engines are being pushed to the wayside as smaller forced-induction engines take the lead. To see the incredible progress the automotive industry has made, you need only recall that GM’s optional 7.4-liter V-8 available in 1974 made just 215 hp, while today Chevrolet offers a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder with 260 hp.
2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan Front View Parked
A report from Automotive News details Hyundai’s plans to bring turbocharged power to the Hyundai Genesis for the 2017 or 2018 model year. The report outlines the plans for a twin-turbo V-6 engine pumping out nearly the 420-hp of the 5.0-liter V-8 engine in today's Genesis sedan.

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2015 Hyundai Genesis Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
3.8L V6Engine
Fuel economy City:
18 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
29 MPG
Horsepower:
311 hp @ 6000rpm
Torque:
293 ft lb of torque @ 5000rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear
  • Radio
  • CD Player
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation
Vehicle
60,000 miles / 60 months
Powertrain
100,000 miles / 120 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 84 months
Roadside
Unlimited miles / 60 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
POWER TRAIN:AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION:GEAR POSITION INDICATION (PRNDL)
Summary
Hyundai Motor America (Hyundai) is recalling certain model year 2015 Genesis vehicles manufactured February 21, 2014, to January 24, 2015. Water may leak into the rear combination lamp assemblies and cause an incorrect gear display on the instrument panel or a delay in the engagement of the selected gear when the vehicle is shifted from Park to Reverse or Drive.
Consequences
If the incorrect gear is being displayed, the vehicle may move in an unintended direction, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Hyundai will notify owners, and dealers will apply pads to prevent water intrusion into the combination lamp housing, free of charge. The recall began on April 14, 2015. Owners may contact Hyundai customer service at 1-855-671-3059. Hyundai's number for this recall is 128.
Potential Units Affected
24,400
Notes
Hyundai Motor America


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Summary
Hyundai Motor America (Hyundai) is recalling certain model year 2015 Genesis vehicles manufactured February 21, 2014, to January 24, 2015. Water may leak into the rear combination lamp assemblies and cause an incorrect gear display on the instrument panel or a delay in the engagement of the selected gear when the vehicle is shifted from Park to Reverse or Drive.
Consequences
If the incorrect gear is being displayed, the vehicle may move in an unintended direction, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Hyundai will notify owners, and dealers will apply pads to prevent water intrusion into the combination lamp housing, free of charge. The recall began on April 14, 2015. Owners may contact Hyundai customer service at 1-855-671-3059. Hyundai's number for this recall is 128.
Potential Units Affected
24,400
Notes
Hyundai Motor America


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
EXTERIOR LIGHTING:TAIL LIGHTS
Summary
Hyundai Motor America (Hyundai) is recalling certain model year 2015 Genesis vehicles manufactured February 21, 2014, to January 24, 2015. Water may leak into the rear combination lamp assemblies and cause an incorrect gear display on the instrument panel or a delay in the engagement of the selected gear when the vehicle is shifted from Park to Reverse or Drive.
Consequences
If the incorrect gear is being displayed, the vehicle may move in an unintended direction, increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Hyundai will notify owners, and dealers will apply pads to prevent water intrusion into the combination lamp housing, free of charge. The recall began on April 14, 2015. Owners may contact Hyundai customer service at 1-855-671-3059. Hyundai's number for this recall is 128.
Potential Units Affected
24,400
Notes
Hyundai Motor America


IIHS Front Small Overlap
Good
NHTSA Rating Front Driver
5
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
5
NHTSA Rating Front Side
4
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
5
NHTSA Rating Overall
5
NHTSA Rating Rollover
5
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
Good
IIHS Overall Side Crash
Good
IIHS Best Pick
1
IIHS Rear Crash
Good
IIHS Roof Strength
Good

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2015 Hyundai Genesis

Depreciation
45.2%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$21,716
45.2%
Insurance
$8,585
17.9%
Fuel Cost
$10,527
21.9%
Financing
$3,754
7.8%
Maintenance
$2,769
5.8%
Repair Costs
$178
0.4%
State Fees
$481
1%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $48,010 What's This?
Value Rating: Below Average