2011 Honda CR-Z

Base FWD 2-Dr Hatchback I4 man trans

2011 honda cr-z Reviews and News

Honda CR Z CRX Insight Top View
Honda's CRX is something of a legend, one of those cars about which everyone seems to have memories. Fond memories at that, usually involving an ultracool college-age dude who drove the wheels off one. The first-generation Honda Insight, on the other hand, is a car that the in crowd probably doesn't even remember, but it was pure dork delight. With an aluminum unibody, it was the first hybrid to reach the U.S. and posted the highest EPA combined fuel economy number of all time: 53 mpg (49/61 mpg city/highway).
2011 Honda CR Z Nerd And Cool
And now we have the 2011 Honda CR-Z, which could be a new CRX-except for the fact that it's a hybrid. So, is the Honda CR-Z a hot hatch for the hip crowd or a fuel economy dork's hypermiling wet dream?
Well, the CRX's influence is not only obvious in the CR-Z's name (which stands for Compact Renaissance Zero) but also in its truncated tail and horizontally split rear window. The triangular taillights bear a strong family resemblance to Honda's current (and pretty dorky) Insight, but the CR-Z is lower, wider, and certainly cooler. The upswept character lines and the C-pillar suggest motion even when the car is parked, but the long front overhang can't mask the Honda's economy-car roots.
The CR-Z shares its basic architecture with the Fit and the Insight, but it rides on a wheelbase that is shorter than either car's. The CR-Z is an inch shorter overall than the Fit but is almost two inches wider and more than five inches lower. Surprisingly, headroom is generous even for tall people, since the seats are mounted low.
Inside, the CR-Z is best described as "futuristic busy," with a multicontoured dashboard that has more angles and textures -- and storage cubbies -- than all four generations of CRXs and Insights put together. Secondary controls are located in symmetrical pods on either side of Honda's smallest-diameter steering wheel, which, on top-spec EX models, is wrapped in blue-stitched black leather and freckled with enough buttons to control a spaceship.
The gauge cluster will impress Trekkies, too, with numerous charts and screens displaying fuel economy information. The cool guy wins here, though, since center stage is given to an oversize tachometer. Bedazzled with loads of three-dimensional elements, it has a blacked-out circle at its center for a digital speed readout. A ring around that speedometer changes color -- it's red when the CR-Z is in Sport Mode and alternates between green and blue in Normal and Eco modes, depending on how well the driver is behaving. The cluster is highly legible, but it's for the enjoyment of the driver only, as it's recessed so deeply into a circular binnacle that the passenger can't see it.
2011 Honda CR Z Cockpit
That's right, the word passenger is singular. Like both the CRX and the first-generation Insight, the CR-Z is strictly a two-seater. In the space where the back seats would be (and some markets do get them), there are two deep plastic pockets that seem pur-posely built to make sitting back there excruciating-probably a good thing, since there are no seatbelts. In place of what would otherwise be a seatback is a plastic cargo separator that folds forward to create a flat floor. Loading cargo is best done through the hatch, as the front seats don't return to their previous position after being folded forward to access the rear -- a surprising oversight from a normally very detail-oriented automaker.
A CR-Z costs just $600 less than an Insight, starting at $19,950. The cabin comes outfitted any way you like it, so long as you like it with silver cloth seats and a two-tone black-and-silver dash and door panels. The $1560 EX package adds an impressive 360-watt, seven-speaker sound system; HID headlights; foglights; aluminum pedals; a few silver interior trim pieces; and Bluetooth, which makes selecting the EX almost mandatory these days. Navigation adds a steep $1800. The CR-Z comes standard with the usual power goodies, automatic climate control, and auxiliary audio inputs, but if you need a sunroof, heated seats, or keyless ignition to feel cool, you'll have to look elsewhere. And if "elsewhere" is behind the car, you'll wish the CR-Z was available with a backup camera -- those C-pillars could block an entire neighborhood.
For sprinting around your neighborhood, the front strut-type suspension from the Fit has been upgraded with aluminum control arms, and disc brakes replace drums at the ends of the torsion-beam rear axle. The fast steering rack's electric power assist motor is 30 percent more robust than the Fit's, in the event you need to make repeated and hasty use of the CR-Z's teensy turning circle. Since the CR-Z weighs a bit less than an Insight and a touch more than a Fit, the implication of these upgrades is clear: this Honda is meant to be driven hard.
2011 Honda CR Z Passenger Rear Three Quarters
To that end, Honda took the Fit's gasoline engine and added the electric motor and IMA system found in the Insight. With some slight revisions to the intake plumbing that were necessary to clear the low hood, the 1.5-liter SOHC four-cylinder makes four fewer ponies than it does in the Fit, a total of 113 hp at 6000 rpm and 107 lb-ft of torque at 4800 rpm. The electric motor adds as much as 13 hp (at 1500 rpm) and 58 lb-ft (from 1000 to 1500 rpm) for a total combined power output of 122 hp and 128 lb-ft.
That ain't much. Then again, with less than 2700 pounds to haul around, the CR-Z is lively -- and especially so with the manual transmission. A $650 CVT is available for video-game dorks -- replete with shift paddles that imitate seven fixed ratios -- but sorry, we say cool kids will still want a stick. Compared with the CVT, the six-speed manual costs this Honda 3 mpg on the EPA combined cycle (34 mpg overall versus 37 mpg), but the CR-Z is the only hybrid available with a clutch pedal, and we wouldn't dream of leaving that offer on the table.
With short throws, the shifter is typical Honda in its delightful weight and precision, and the clutch pedal's takeup is smooth and linear. In fact, once you're driving the CR-Z, you could easily forget that it's a hybrid at all. The biggest clue comes when you stop, engage neutral, and notice that the engine switches off. It intuitively and quickly restarts as you put the car in gear to move off, and the electric motor shows its low-end torque when starting out on a hill. In every way, though, the manual-transmission CR-Z is the least hybrid-y hybrid ever. Even the brake feel is excellent, with no obvious point of transition between regenerative and friction brakes.
2011 Honda CR Z Gauges
Steering feel is largely absent but, happily, so is torque steer. Sport mode quickens the throttle calibration, alters the assist characteristics of the electric motor, and reduces steering boost, all of which conspire to make the CR-Z even more fun. At low speeds, chassis balance tends toward understeer, but the little Honda's rump becomes more willing to rotate as corner entry speeds increase. The police three counties over will know any time you're misbehaving, though, since the standard all-season Dunlops scream at the very suggestion of hard cornering. Their noise also dominates at highway speeds, where the engine is commendably hushed -- in stark contrast to the Fit, whose short top gear results in lots of racket from under the hood.
The CR-Z's ride quality is impressive for a vehicle with such a short (95.9-inch) wheelbase, and soft dampers allow the suspension to use its full wheel travel on very bumpy pavement, relying on compliant bump stops to soften any hard bottoming out. Unfortunately, this calibration results in a lot of body motions -- the CR-Z will pogo its way over rough back roads with considerable body lean and heave. Its path doesn't seem to be upset by all the vertical motions, but your passenger might be.
If your passenger happens to be familiar with the original CRX, he or she might point out that it wasn't a full-on sports car, either. Like many legends, the CRX's reputation doesn't really reflect what it actually was -- or what it did. You see, the cool-dude hot-hatch image we associate with that 1980s car was for the high-performance model: the CRX Si. It's easy to forget that lesser variants of the CRX combined a reasonable fun-to-drive factor with astonishing fuel economy.
That sounds just like the CR-Z, now doesn't it?
Of course, it was the presence of the Si that cemented the CRX's place in the cool car hall of fame. Without an Si variant, the CR-Z hasn't yet secured its spot. We'll wait impatiently for Honda to stuff one of its signature 8000-rpm screamers under the hood of the CR-Z, but in the meantime, we think both the dudes and the dorks can find a lot to love about this little car. It proves that we're officially past the point where hybrids have to be nerdilicious, single-purpose fuel-economy machines. The CR-Z is a hybrid solely because that's this millennium's way of achieving the CRX's performance/economy balance. Welcome back, CRX -- now where is that Si?
Honda CR Z CRX Insight Top View
Comparatively Speaking: Top Fuel Misers*
Toyota Prius: 50 mpg
Honda Civic Hybrid: 42 mpg
Honda Insight: 41 mpg
Ford Fusion Hybrid: 39 mpg
Mercury Milan Hybrid: 39 mpg
Honda CR-Z CVT: 37 mpg
Smart ForTwo: 36 mpg
Lexus HS250h: 35 mpg
Audi A3 TDI: 34 mpg
Nissan Altima Hybrid: 34 mpg
Toyota Camry Hybrid: 34 mpg
Volkswagen Golf TDI: 34 mpg
Volkswagen Jetta TDI: 34 mpg
*EPA Combined ratings for 2010 models, except CR-Z, which is a 2011
2011 Honda CR-Z Price (base/as tested) $19,950/$23,310
POWERTRAIN
Engine: 16-valve SOHC I-4
Displacement: 1.5 liters (91 cu in)
Motor: 13-hp DC
Horsepower: 122 hp @ 6000 rpm (combined)
Torque: 128/123 lb-ft @ 1000 rpm (combined; manual/CVT)
Transmission
6-speed manual, CVT
DRIVE
Front-wheel
Chassis
Steering: Electrically assisted
Suspension, Front: Strut-type, coil springs
Suspension, Rear: Torsion beam, coil springs
Brakes F/R:Vented discs/discs, ABS
Tires: Dunlop SP Sport 7000AS
Tire Size: 195/55VR-16
Measurements
L x W x H: 160.6 x 68.5 x 54.9 in
Wheelbase: 95.9 in
Track F/R: 59.6/59.1 in
Weight: 2654 lb
Weight Dist., F/R: 59/41%
EPA Milage: 31/37 mpg (manual), 35/39 mpg (CVT)
2011 Honda CR Z Passenger Side
Is the 2011 Honda CR-Z a new CRX? Well, the CRX's influence is not only obvious in the CR-Z's name (which stands for Compact Renaissance Zero) but also in its truncated tail and horizontally split rear window. The triangular taillights bear a strong family resemblance to Honda's current (and pretty dorky) Insight, but the CR-Z is lower, wider, and certainly cooler. The upswept character lines and D-pillar suggest motion even when the car is parked, but the long front overhang can't mask this car's economy-car roots. After all, the CR-Z shares its basic architecture with the Fit and the Insight, but it rides on a wheelbase that is considerably shorter. The CR-Z is an inch shorter overall than the Fit but is almost two inches wider and more than five inches lower. Surprisingly, headroom is generous, since the sport seats are mounted low.
2011 Honda CR Z Passenger Three Quarter
"Futuristic Busy" Cabin
Inside, the CR-Z is best described as "futuristic busy," with a multicontoured dashboard that has more angles and textures-and storage binnacles-than all four generations of CRX and Insight put together. Secondary controls are located in symmetrical pods on either side of Honda's smallest steering wheel, which, on top-trim EX models, is wrapped in blue-stitched black leather and freckled with enough buttons to control a spaceship.
The gauge cluster has numerous charts and displays dealing with fuel economy, but center stage is given to an oversize tachometer. Bedazzled with loads of three-dimensional elements, it has a blacked-out circle at its center that hides an LCD speed readout. A ring around that speedometer changes color-it's red when the CR-Z is in Sport Mode and alternates between green and blue in "Normal" and "Eco" modes, depending on how aggressively the car is being driven. The cluster is highly legible, but it's for the enjoyment of the driver only, as it's recessed so deeply into a circular binnacle that the passenger can't see it.
Room for two
That's right, like both the CRX and the first-generation Insight, the CR-Z is strictly a two-seater. In the space where the back seats would be (and they're optional in some markets) there are two deep plastic binnacles that seem purposely built to make sitting back there excruciating-probably a good thing, since there are no seatbelts. In place of what would otherwise be a seatback is a plastic cargo separator that folds forward to create a flat load floor. Inserting cargo is best done through the hatch, as the front seats don't return to their previous position after being folded forward for access to the rear-a surprising oversight from a normally very detail-oriented automaker.
The cabin comes only with silver cloth and two-tone dash, door panels, and carpeting. The EX package adds an impressive 360-watt, seven-speaker sound system, HID headlights, fog lights, aluminum pedals, a few silver interior trim pieces, and Bluetooth, which makes buying it almost mandatory these days. The only other option available is navigation. The CR-Z comes standard with the usual power goodies, automatic climate control, and auxiliary audio inputs, but if you need a sunroof, heated seats, or keyless-go, you'll have to look elsewhere. And if "elsewhere" is behind the car, you'll wish the CR-Z was available with a backup camera-the D-pillars could block an entire neighborhood.
2011 Honda CR Z Hood
A Honda to be driven hard
For sprinting around your neighborhood, the Fit's front strut-type suspension has been upgraded with aluminum control arms, and disc brakes have found their way to the edges of the torsion-beam rear suspension. The fast steering rack's electric power assist motor is 30 percent more robust than the Fit's in the event you need to make repeated and hasty use of the CR-Z's teensy turning circle. Since the CR-Z weighs about the same as an Insight and around 100 pounds less than the Fit, the implication of these upgrades is clear: this Honda is meant to be driven hard.
To that end, Honda took the Fit's gas engine and added the electric motor and IMA system found in the Insight. With some slight revisions to the intake plumbing necessary to clear the low hood, the 1.5-liter SOHC four-cylinder makes a few less ponies than it does in the Fit, a total of 113 hp at 6000 rpm and 107 lb-ft of torque at 4800 rpm. The electric motor adds up to 13 hp (at 1500 rpm) and 58 lb-ft (from 1000 to 1500 rpm) for a total combined power output of 122 hp and 128 lb-ft of torque.
Finally, a hybrid with a manual transmission
With less than 2700 pounds to haul around, the CR-Z is lively, and especially so with the manual transmission. A CVT-replete with shift paddles that imitate seven fixed ratios-is available, but we prefer the stick. The six-speed manual costs this Honda 3 mpg on the EPA combined cycle, but the CR-Z is the only hybrid available with a clutch pedal, and we wouldn't dream of leaving that offer on the table.
With short throws, the shifter is typically Honda in its delightful weight and precision, and the clutch pedal's takeup is smooth and linear. In fact, once you're driving the CR-Z, you could easily forget it's a hybrid at all. The biggest clue happens when you come to a stop and notice that the engine has switched off. It intuitively and quickly restarts as you engage first gear to move off, and the electric motor shows its low-end torque when starting out on a hill. In every way, though, the manual-transmission CR-Z is the least hybrid-y hybrid ever. Even the brake feel is excellent, with no obvious point of transition between regenerative and friction brakes.
Steering feel is largely absent but, happily, so is torque steer. Sport mode quickens the throttle calibration, alters the assist characteristics of the electric motor, and reduces steering boost, all of which conspire to make the CR-Z even more fun. At low speeds, chassis balance tends toward understeer, but the little Honda's rump becomes more willing to rotate as corner entry speeds increase. The standard all-season Dunlops scream at the very suggestion of hard cornering. Their noise also dominates at highway speeds, where the engine is commendably hushed-in stark contrast to the Fit, whose short top gear results in lots of racket from under the hood.
2011 Honda CR Z Side Profile
Ride quality is impressive for a vehicle with such a short (94.5-inch) wheelbase, and soft dampers allow the suspension to use its full wheel travel on very bumpy pavement, relying on compliant bump stops to soften any hard bottoming out. Unfortunately, this calibration results in a lot of body motions-the CR-Z will pogo its way through rough back roads with considerable body lean and heave. Its path doesn't seem to be upset by all the vertical motions, but your passenger might not be so lucky.
If your passenger happens to be familiar with the original CRX, he might point out that it wasn't a full-on sports car, either. Like many legends, the CRX's reputation might not completely reflect what it actually was, or what it did. You see, that hot-hatch image we associate with that 1980s hatch was the high-po model: the CRX Si. It's easy to forget that lesser variants of the CRX combined reasonable measures of fun-to-driveness with downright astonishing fuel economy.
That sounds just like the CR-Z, now doesn't it?
2011 Honda CRZ
2011 Honda CRZ
The Honda CR-Z is on sexy hatchback sedan. This vehicle is a sleek designed hybrid that offers the ultimate in fuel economy, comfort and style. The CR-Z is filling the void that Honda created when they stopped producing the CRX which was a big selling hatchback in Honda's past. The CR-Z has a very sporty design that makes this two seater a very attractive model that offers a little more flare than most other Honda vehicles. The Honda CR-Z is powered by a combination of a 14 horsepower electric motor and a 122 horsepower gasoline engine. This hybrid gets a 31MPG rating in town and 37 MPG rating on the highway. There are other hybrids that may offer a more generous fuel rating, but the CR-Z is still very competitive in this field and may offer considerable savings compared to others in its class. The CR-Z starts just under $20,000 and the EX edition will run you about a thousand dollars more.

The three mode drive system offers a very unique opportunity to take advantage of some under the hood tweaks by simply pressing a button. The paddle shifting feature is new to lower end vehicles and has been reserved for supercars in the past.
2011 Honda CR Z EX Front Right View
When I first saw the Honda CR-Z at the Detroit auto show, I was hugely excited. The tiny little hatchback looks fantastic and is, in my view, the coolest design to emerge from Honda in years. But having finally driven the car, I am rather disappointed.
2011 Honda CR Z EX Front Left View
2011 Honda CR-Z EX W/Navigation
2011 Honda CR Z EX Rear Left Side View
2012 Honda CR Z Front Three Quarter 2
What’s new on the 2012 Honda CR-Z? Very little, apart from some new seating trim and a mild $365 price hike. Honda announced pricing for the base 2012 CR-Z starts at $20,315, including $770 in destination fees. The uplevel EX model adds automatic headlamps, fog lamps, a 360-watt sound system, and starts at $21,875. EX models are also available with a navigation system for an additional $1800. For the most part, 2012 CR-Zs are identical to 2011 models, but Honda notes cars painted in Crystal Black Pearl are now available with a new black seat fabric, replacing the standard metallic mesh seating. Opting for the black fabric adds no additional cost. Beneath the skin, the 2012 CR-Z is essentially unchanged. Power comes from a 1.5-liter I-4 mated with an electric motor. Net output for the system is 122 hp and 128 lb-ft of torque. All CR-Zs feature a slick-shifting six-speed manual as standard equipment, although a continuously variable transmission is available for an extra $650. The powertrain has three modes, Eco, Normal, and Sport, which tune the hybrid system for efficiency or performance. Put the CR-Z in full Eco mode, and the car can achieve up to 35 mpg in the city and 39 mpg on the highway, provided you’ve opted for the CVT. Is it worth the cost? It’s hard to say: the CR-Z has a new competitor in the form of the Hyundai Veloster, which trumps the CR-Z in power figures and fuel economy, and also undercuts its price tag by roughly $1000. Will CR-Z shoppers flock instead to the funky Veloster? Only time will tell. Source: Honda
Honda NSX Super GT JGTC
The successor to Honda’s ‘90s performance halo car, the celebrated NSX, may see the light of day after all. Autocar reports that Honda CEO Takanobo Ito announced at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show that the Japanese automaker is starting development of a new sports car. Rather than chasing outright speed and power with this new model, Honda says it will build a car around a drastic power-to-weight ratio.
2006 Honda CR V SE Front

2006 Honda CR-V

The Problem: On CR-V models, residue from interior cleaning products may accumulate on power window master switch’s electrical contacts. Over time the residue, combined with normal use, may cause the contacts to degrade, which may lead to an electrical fire. The Fix: Honda is recalling the affected CR-Vs, and will notify owners in late September. Owners of affected vehicles should take them into an authorized dealer as soon as they get the notice. The dealer will replace the power window master switch with an updated design. Vehicles Affected: Honda says this recall pertains to 80,111 CR-Vs built for the 2006 model year. CR-Z The Problem: Manual transmission-equipped CR-Zs are being recalled for a powertrain software update needed to prevent the electric motor from rotating in the opposite direction from the one selected in the transmission. If the vehicle doesn’t have their foot on the brake the car may slowly roll in an unexpected direction, which may lead to a crash. Honda says the potential problem may occur when the gasoline engine has stalled and the IMA battery is in a very low state of charge. The Fix: Honda is recalling the affected CR-Zs, and will notify owners in late September. Owners of affected vehicles should take them into an authorized dealer as soon as they get the notice. The dealer will reflash the software with an update that includes further controls to correct the problem. Vehicles Affected: This recall pertains to 5626 CR-Zs built Honda is also recalling 5626 CR-Zs from model year 2011 for a powertrain software update. Source: Honda
Honda Crz Mugen Rr Front Left
Think your stock Honda CR-Z sport hybrid is a bit of a yawn? We’ve already shown you that the folks at Mugen will gladly sell you some go-fast items to make your green machine quite a bit hotter. But what if you think your Mugen CR-Z looks a little bit too…stock?

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Used 2011 Honda CR-Z Values / Pricing

Suggested Retail Price
$19,345

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2011 Honda CR-Z
2011 Honda CR-Z
Base FWD 2-Dr Hatchback I4
35 MPG City | 39 MPG Hwy
Top Ranking Vehicles - MPG
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1
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2
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3
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4
rank
5
2011 Honda CR-Z
2011 Honda CR-Z
Base FWD 2-Dr Hatchback I4
35 MPG City | 39 MPG Hwy
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20
2011 Honda CR-Z
2011 Honda CR-Z
Base FWD 2-Dr Hatchback I4
$19,345
Top Ranking Vehicles - Price
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2011 Honda CR-Z
2011 Honda CR-Z
Base FWD 2-Dr Hatchback I4
122hp
Top Ranking Vehicles - Horsepower

2011 Honda CR-Z Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
1.5L I4Engine
Fuel economy City:
31 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
37 MPG
Horsepower:
122 hp @ 6000rpm
Torque:
128 ft lb of torque @ 1000rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats (optional)
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer Rear (optional)
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation (optional)
Vehicle
36,000 miles / 36 months
Powertrain
60,000 miles / 60 months
Corrosion
Unlimited miles / 60 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:10
Component
POWER TRAIN
Summary
HONDA IS RECALLING CERTAIN MODEL YEAR 2011 CR-Z PASSENGER CARS WITH MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS, MANUFACTURED FROM JANUARY 8, 2010, THROUGH JUNE 27, 2011. SHOULD THE ENGINE STALL WHILE THE BRAKE PEDAL IS NOT PRESSED, THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT THE ENGINE CONTROL UNIT (ECU) SOFTWARE MAY CAUSE THE ELECTRIC MOTOR OF THE HYBRID SYSTEM TO MOVE THE VEHICLE UNEXPECTEDLY IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION OF THE SELECTED GEAR.
Consequences
UNEXPECTED VEHICLE MOVEMENT COULD INCREASE THE RISK OF A CRASH OR PERSONAL INJURY TO THE PERSONS IN THE PATH OF THE MOVING VEHICLE.
Remedy
HONDA WILL NOTIFY OWNERS, AND DEALERS WILL UPDATE THE ECU SOFTWARE, FREE OF CHARGE. THE SAFETY RECALL BEGAN ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2011. OWNERS MAY CONTACT HONDA AUTOMOBILE CUSTOMER SERVICE AT 1-800-999-1009.
Potential Units Affected
5,626
Notes
HONDA (AMERICAN HONDA MOTOR CO.)


NHTSA Rating Overall
3
NHTSA Rating Front Driver
3
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
2
NHTSA Rating Front Side
3
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rollover
5
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
N/R
IIHS Overall Side Crash
N/R
IIHS Best Pick
N/R
IIHS Rear Crash
N/R
IIHS Roof Strength
N/R

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