The Dangers of Texting and Driving

While it may seem like an obvious thing to avoid, the ubiquity of cell phones today has lead to texting while driving being an all-too-common sight on the road.

If you find yourself tempted to text while driving, consider creating ways to make it more difficult to do so. Try leaving your phone somewhere you can’t reach while you’re driving, or download one of the apps mentioned above.

On the surface, texting while driving seems harmless enough. When you think about how long it takes to send a quick text message to someone, it’s really a matter of mere seconds.

Just don’t text and drive. It’s too dangerous and the risks are not worth it.

But tests have shown that the minimum amount of time texting takes away from the focus on driving is 5 seconds. At just 55mph, that’s enough time to drive more than the length of an entire football field – more than enough space and time for an accident to happen.

Texting while driving has become such an epidemic that ad campaigns have been produced around the world to try to cut down on how much it happens. Laws have also been passed in a number of states to make texting or talking on the phone (without using hands free) illegal and subject to tickets and fines. And there are even apps that were engineered for some handsets to help users stop texting while on the road.

Still, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, driver distraction (code for texting while driving) is the cause of 18 percent of all fatal crashes and 23% of all car accidents, the latter of which equals roughly 1.5 million crashes every year. Texting while driving also makes a crash far more likely – up to 23 times more likely, in fact.

Texting while driving is incredibly dangerous no matter who you are. It does not discriminate. Whether you just earned your license or you’ve been driving for 30 years, texting while driving is taking a risk. And not just for you but for anyone in your vehicle and anyone else on the road around you.

SOURCES:

http://www.nhtsa.gov

http://www.textinganddrivingsafety.com/texting-and-driving-stats/

https://www.fcc.gov/guides/texting-while-driving

http://www.edgarsnyder.com/car-accident/cell-phone/cell-phone-statistics.html

http://teendriving.statefarm.com/

Mtg Legends
I got my drivers license in the fall of 1954 and have quit driving about 8 months ago because I no longer trust my own reactions. In all those years I had ONLY had what I thought was even a "close call," once after a sneeze and once during a MASSIVE yawn! Wonder how I get along without a cell phone?
Ann Allen-Weatherly
I see so many people driving and doing this.  I also have people in my family who do this!  I have spoken my peace about and just say prayers that those I love will not be harmed by such crazy stupid actions.  Please don't text and drive.  Love, Nana
homebuilding
Speaking of distractions--Isn't it about time to standardized operational controls between manufacturers?
This was mandated for motorcycles in the early 1970s.
Still, autos and light trucks have many ways to adjust your radio/media; many ways to turn on your wipers/adjust wiper speed/initiate windshield washing/rear wiper on hatchbacks; varieties of headlight switches; many gearshift patterns--and shifting locations (automatics are the worst); heater/airconditioner/defrost/windshield heating controls are done a dozen ways, at least; and steering wheel controls/buttons are getting very, very busy--all this and we haven't even looked or adjusted that navigation screen, nor have we engaged its many options--all this and we haven't even looked at the fancyfone, yet.
Just try to operate these aspects of your own car (or one you are considering for purchase).  Can you perform ANY of them without diverting your eyes and your concentration AWAY FROM THE ROAD?  To say that one should turn on your wipers only when stopped is to defy reality and give manufactures an easy pass.
It's time for action on this, too, folks !
Richard Jung
$5000 fine of one month salary which ever is greater for a first offense.  2d offense same + loss of license for 30 days.  3d offense $10,000 fine and loss of license for one year.

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