NEWS: Report: First C7 Corvette Crash!

By Donny Nordlicht - February 13, 2013
2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Crash
Well, that sucks. A poster on the forum Digital Corvettes was sent a picture of a bright blue 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray from a friend in Arizona; sadly, said Corvette was in a ditch looking pretty worse for wear.
According to poster gpetry, his friend spotted the wrecked C7 up in the mountains of Arizona, where the Corvette had oversteered its way through some switchbacks right into that ditch. Said gpetry's friend: "Car was in worse shape than looks. Hit guardrail on left and bounced back to rocks." Ouch.
Chevrolet was able to confirm that this Corvette Stingray (and probably others) was undergoing final testing in The Grand Canyon State and that it was a single-car collision with no injuries. The mountains of Arizona are a good place to test out the C7's 450-hp, 450-lb-ft 6.2-liter V-8, seven-speed manual transmission, and sticky Michelin Pilot Super Sport 245/40R-18 front, 245/35R-19 rear tires.
There are three good things to come out of this crash, however. One, we can see that the 2014 Corvette held up pretty well after impact; two, the first customer who wrecks their 2014 Corvette Stingray doesn't have to be embarrassed about having the first crashed C7. Three, most – if not all – early pre-production vehicles like these are usually cut up and scrapped for liability reasons anyway; although, Chevy told us that this specific car wasn't badly damaged and wasn't totaled by this accident. Don’t believe us? Take a look at this photo of an early build C6 Corvette and XLR – if the lack of wheels doesn’t imply their fate, the spray-painted lettering certainly does.
2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Crash

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