Geneva 2013: Honda Previews its Civic Wagon

Hatchback fans, curb your enthusiasm: the car you see above is almost certainly not going to come to the United States. It's a pity, because this Honda Civic Wagon concept will look excellent when it debuts in Geneva next month.

It's important to note that this concept isn't built on the Honda Civic we drive in the U.S. (and the one that recently received a last-minute update); instead, it's built on the European Civic made in Swindon, England. That means it'll probably also feature Honda's Earth Dreams 1.6-liter i-DTEC turbodiesel engine and a manual transmission.

As for the concept's looks, it looks less like a Honda Civic than a Citroen DS5--and that's a good thing, we think. There's a big, sloping windshield and plenty of glass/daylight opening up front (hallmarks of Honda's Fit/Jazz hatchback), but past the B-pillars the roofline slopes down and the beltline angles up. The rear door pulls are integrated into the C-pillars; behind that pillar the glass gets thinner and thinner. When it finally reaches the rear hatch (with an oversized rear deck spoiler), it tapers off to a point. The wraparound rear glass is fairly tall, however, so it looks like rearward visibility won't be as compromised as other cars with small quarter windows.

The oversized taillights wrap around the rear hatch and feature a prominent Honda badge; at the bottom of the rear end the diffuser features dual center-exit exhaust pipes, an impressively sporty touch that matches the flared wheel arches and large wheels.

The Civic Wagon is sure to be a stunner, but even then it won't take the prize for Honda's prettiest show car at Geneva. No, that trophy will go to the recently updated Acura NSX "2.0," which makes its European debut with a new interior and refined looks.

If the NSX is too unrealistic for you, Honda has one more trick up its sleeve: the CR-V crossover, which now sports the 1.6-liter i-DTEC turbodiesel engine from the Civic range. The i-DTEC will only be available with front-wheel drive and a manual transmission, which means it'll probably be one of the less-expensive CR-Vs on sale when it reaches European dealers this fall. Here's hoping the experience of driving a diesel manual CR-V is as interesting as it sounds.

Source: Honda

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