2014 Toyota Tundra to Carry $26,915 MSRP

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The Toyota Tundra burst back onto the full-size truck scene for 2007 with more attitude, space, and capabilities. While the refreshed 2014 Tundra can't quite be called an all-new model, pricing will stay competitive: a base regular cab model with rear-wheel drive and a V-6 will carry a $26,915 MSRP. At the top end of the range are the 2014 Tundra 1794 Edition and Platinum, both of which have a four-wheel-drive base price of $48,315, including the $995 destination charge.

Toyota claims that the 2014 Tundra lineup’s prices are, on average, $263 lower than comparable 2013 models. The 2014 Tundra is offered in SR, SR5, Limited, Platinum, and 1794 Edition forms, as a regular cab, double cab, or CrewMax. The double cab and CrewMax are offered with a bench or bucket seats in the front. Engines include a 270-hp 4.0-liter V-6 for the base SR trim as well as a 310-hp 4.6-liter V-8 for the SR and SR5 trims. Of course, the engine we’d pick is the 381-hp 5.7-liter V-8, which is offered on every trim from the SR to the Platinum and 1794 Edition trucks. The V-6 uses a five-speed automatic while the V-8s get a six-speed unit.

The $26,915 2014 Toyota Tundra SR gets as standard 18-inch steel wheels, a rearview camera, Bluetooth audio streaming, AC, and power windows and door locks. As with all refreshed 2014 Tundras, the SR benefits from a redesigned interior, and Toyota says the distance for the driver to reach HVAC controls is down by 2.6 inches. If you’re looking for more power than the 270-hp V-6 can provide, a regular-cab, rear-drive 2014 Tundra SR with the 381-hp V-8 is available for $29,460. With either engine, upgrading from regular to double cab will cost $890. The V-6 isn’t available with four-wheel drive, but is a $3050 option with the two V-8s on every trim from the SR to the two luxury trims at the top. The least-expensive 2014 Tundra with four-wheel drive is an SR double cab with the 4.6-liter V-8, at a price of $31,900.

For $30,460, the double-cab 2014 Toyota Tundra SR5 can be had with the 4.6-liter V-8 in rear-drive form and a “professional gear” interior theme that adds metallic accents and contrasting fabric. The SR5′s seat stitching is said to increase durability. 2014 Tundra CrewMax trucks start at $32,820 in rear-drive form with the 4.6-liter V-8 and $34,320 with the 5.7-liter V-8. The SR5 adds $650 worth of equipment over the 2013-model-year truck, but with unchanged pricing, Toyota says.

It starts to get a little luxurious inside with the Limited trim, which adds leather seats and soft-touch door trim, dual-zone climate control, a 10-way power driver’s seat, chrome door handle and side mirrors, 20-inch alloy wheels, a deck rail system, and a navigation system with an upgraded sound system. Using the standard 5.7-liter V-8, the 2014 Tundra Limited in double-cab form starts at $37,935 and $39,840 for the CrewMax. Toyota says that Limited CrewMax trucks are priced about $2000 below the 2013-model-year equivalent trucks.

Premium truck buyers interested in a 2014 Tundra can choose from the Platinum and 1794 Edition models, both of which cost $45,265 with rear-wheel drive in the CrewMax bodystyle and $48,315 with four-wheel drive. Both trims come standard with a heated/cooled 12-way power driver’s seat and six-way power passenger’s seat, front and rear parking sensors, LED daytime running lights, a premium sound system, power moonroof, power tilt/telescopic steering wheel, a navigation system, and an available blindspot monitoring system with Rear Cross Traffic Alert.

Go with the 2014 Tundra Platinum and you’ll get perforated, diamond-pleated leather seats (the same leather used in the Lexus LS) with matching door and instrument panel inserts and chrome accent badging. The 1794 Edition offers brown leather seats with embossed leather and suede accents, plus matching interior trim.

Whether the Tundra’s updates will be enough to keep it going against the revised entries from Chevrolet, GMC, and Ram — and a new F-150 coming for 2015 — isn’t clear. Through the first seven months of 2013, Tundra sales are up 13.1 percent, with 61,385 units sold. That’s below the smaller Tacoma’s 95,070 units but still a sizable sum.

Check out our 2014 Tundra First Drive here.

Source: Toyota

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