2015 Chrysler 200

LX FWD 4-Dr Sedan I4 auto trans

2015 chrysler 200 Reviews and News

2015 Dodge Charger SXT AWD Front Three Quarter In Motion 02
MIRABEL, Quebec -- “ICAR” is not French for “playground” or “skating rink,” but we’re using the snow-covered Canadian test track as both. We’re in a 2015 Dodge Charger Pursuit, an honest-to-goodness cop car with a 370-hp, 5.7-liter V-8, winter tires, and all-wheel drive. Lights and sirens on, stability control off, we blast toward a slalom with all four tires kicking up rooster tails of snow. The Charger’s tail swings back and forth like a pendulum as we flick through the slalom, then it’s into a 360-degree turn where we stand on the gas again to slide the police car sideways past a line of orange cones.
2015 Dodge Charger Pursuit V 8 AWD Front Three Quarter In Motion 02
It’s a lot of fun, but for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, all-wheel-drive cars are serious business -- especially in places where winter lasts a long time, such as Quebec and much of the northern U.S. In 2014, 32 percent of all Chrysler 300 sedans and 30 percent of all Dodge Chargers were sold with all-wheel drive, for instance. More than half of all Jeep models come with AWD, and a whopping 80 percent of all Ram trucks are sold with four-wheel drive.
Having four driven wheels is a big selling point for drivers in the snowbelt. To find out exactly how much of a difference it makes, we’re driving a handful of new FCA vehicles around a snow- and ice-covered racetrack that, in summer, is used for track days and driver training.
2015 Chrysler 200S AWD Front Three Quarter In Motion 04

Appropriate footwear

Winter tires are required by law on all cars in Quebec from mid-December until mid-March, and swapping into a Charger and a 200C equipped with all-season tires demonstrates the limits of all-wheel drive. Both the 2015 Dodge Charger and the 2015 Chrysler 200C still pull away from a stop quickly, as the cars’ computers shuffle power fore and aft as the tires slip, but attacking the slalom reveals how little cornering grip the factory rubber offers. The cars alternately under- and oversteer, sliding around wildly at angles that require lots of steering-wheel input to correct.
Most telling of all, when we need to brake for a stop sign, the cars barely slow as the ABS rat-a-tats in an effort to get the tires to grip the slick surface. Here, there’s nothing to hit if it all goes wrong, but getting a car this out of shape on a snowy morning commute could be disastrous. Having AWD might keep you from getting stuck on the way home during a snowstorm, but all-season tires still leave much to be desired.
“Turning and stopping ... it’s a joke,” agrees one of ICAR’s driving instructors. We hurry to get back into the vehicles equipped with winter tires: Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1s for the Charger and Pirelli Sottozeros for the 200C.
2015 Dodge Charger SXT AWD Right Front Three Quarter In Motion

The big sedan

In the case of the civilian-spec 2015 Dodge Charger, driving all four wheels means sticking to the 292-hp, 3.6-liter V-6 engine. Only law enforcement can match AWD with the V-8 in the Charger. With either engine, a take-off from the eight-speed automatic transmission sends power forward to the front wheels when needed; it can fully disconnect the front axle when the rear wheels have adequate traction, reducing drag and improving overall fuel economy. The 2015 Dodge Charger is EPA-rated at 18/27 mpg (city/highway) with all-wheel drive, down only slightly from the rear-drive model’s 19/31 mpg ratings.
On the slippery ICAR course, the 2015 Dodge Charger drives almost as if we’re on dry pavement. All four tires dig in to power us away from the line, the winter tires stab at the snow to slow the car for a stop sign, and even when we romp on the throttle midway around a turn, the all-wheel-drive system is so balanced and grippy that the car simply keeps scribing the general arc of the corner without a problem. We had no trouble driving a rear-wheel-drive 2012 Dodge Charger SXT Plus car in snow and slush, but the amount of grip of this AWD version is mighty appealing to those of us who deal with winter for a third of the year.
2015 Chrysler 200S AWD Rear Three Quarter In Motion

The midsize sedan

The 2015 Chrysler 200C is one of the few midsize sedans to still offer all-wheel drive, along with the Subaru Legacy and Ford Fusion. AWD versions of the 200S and 200C models come with Chrysler’s 3.6-liter V-6 engine that sends 295 hp through a nine-speed automatic transmission (a four-cylinder engine is available with the front-wheel-drive 200S and C). The 200’s all-wheel-drive system acts primarily as a front-driver, disconnecting the entire rear axle to save fuel. As soon as the front tires slip, up to 60 percent of the engine’s output is shuffled to the rear.
Like the Dodge Charger, the 2015 Chrysler 200C’s all-wheel-drive system powers us around without a hitch. Compared to the Charger’s ultra-planted feel, however, the 200C gives drivers a little more leeway to play, especially when the stability controller is switched into Sport mode. We find we can get the back end to step out a few degrees when we get on the power partway through a corner. It’s entertaining rather than scary and matches up to the more premium driving experience Chrysler claims to have baked into the 200. Playful antics aside, the 200C’s traction control never needs to intervene, as the rear axle engages imperceptibly and quickly once the fronts begin to spin.
2015 Dodge Charger SXT AWD Rear Three Quarter In Motion

The lure of AWD

For shoppers in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, having an all-wheel-drive car is a necessity, whether for traversing snowy roads or gravel ones. While the standard assumption is that finding a car with AWD means heading to a Subaru or Jeep dealer, Chrysler and Dodge can appeal to an even greater audience by offering the systems on their mainstream sedans.
2015 Chrysler 200 Limited Vs 2014 Honda Accord EX Front Three Quarter
"Follow the incompetent" is not an exhortation that often rings through university auditoriums at graduation time, but it's sage advice nonetheless. You want to take the job previously held by the guy who surfed porn all day and pilfered office supplies. You want to date the girl whose last boyfriend acted like a jerk and was lousy in bed. Follow an act like that, and you can't help but look like a star. The new 2015 Chrysler 200 has that same advantage. The previous 200 (nee Sebring) was a slacker that idled at the bottom of the mid-size sedan barrel -- next to it, the new 200 shines.
But while following the incompetent can be a boon on a personal level, it only helps so much in the automotive arena. The 2015 Chrysler 200 represents a quantum leap over its predecessor, but in the ultra-competitive mid-size sedan segment, buyers will want to know how it stacks up against its peers. So we pitted it against one of the biggest names in the business and the number-one choice among retail buyers, the 2014 Honda Accord.
Keeping it real
To keep it real, we selected high-volume, mainstream models. For the 200, that meant the Limited, which sits one up from the base LX but below the sport-oriented 200S and the top-spec 200C. Our Accord was an EX, which is pretty much smack dab in the middle of the Accord lineup.
Although we stuck with four-cylinder engines, it's interesting that Honda and Chrysler are two of the four automakers that still offer a V-6 in this segment. Chrysler's 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 makes a best-in-class 295 hp and can be had with all-wheel drive. Honda's 3.5-liter six is good for 278 hp and is front-wheel-drive only. However, the mid-size-sedan market is really a four-cylinder market, so that's what we specified for our test. That means a direct-injected 2.4-liter four with variable valve timing, whether you're talking about the Accord or the 200. Chrysler extracts 184 hp and 173 lb-ft of torque from its engine, while Honda wrings out 185 hp and 181 lb-ft from its powerplant.
Transmissions: going to extremes
The quest for the greatest possible efficiency has both companies taking extraordinary measures with their transmissions. Honda has switched to a continuously variable transmission for the current Accord, while Chrysler is going for the maximum ratio spread in a conventional automatic with its newly developed nine-speed, an industry first. The Accord's resultant EPA figures are 27/36 mpg (city/highway), which are good but not quite as good as the class leaders. The 200 is rated at 23 mpg city and 36 mpg on the highway, which is good but not quite as good as the Honda.
Chrysler's nine-speed automatic is certainly a complex piece -- its teething problems delayed the launch of the new 2014 Jeep Cherokee, where it first appeared -- but you wouldn't know it from our experience in the 200. The shifts are very smooth and it only rarely gets tripped up. Given the wealth of gears it has to pick from, however, it should perhaps be a little more willing to switch to a lower one when ascending a grade. Unfortunately, taking matters into your own hands isn't really an option, as the Limited has neither shift paddles nor a sport program (those are exclusive to the 200S and the 200C). Even with those caveats, the nine-speed is still the keen driver's choice over the CVT, which is almost always the least-appealing automatic transmission option, despite its unrivaled efficiency. We should note at this point that Honda still offers a manual in the Accord, and it's not relegated just to the base version; it can be had in trim levels as high as the EX. The vast majority of buyers, though, will take the CVT, and at least the one in the Accord is less offensive than many, mostly because the engine it's attached to is fairly pleasant sounding when the CVT sends it into the upper rev range and keeps it there. Chrysler's Tigershark four wouldn't fare as well under the same circumstances, as sound quality is far less mellifluous, although it only comes into play above 4000 rpm or so.
Newfound refinement
In fact, both cars are impressively quiet overall, something that neither was known for in past iterations. Honda has added active noise cancellation to all Accords, while Chrysler uses an acoustic laminated windshield and side glass (although only on the 200S and C). We were impressed with the low levels of wind, road, and suspension noise. Another area of newfound polish is ride quality. These two mainstream mid-size sedans deliver a supple ride that shames most German luxury sedans. Credit, in part, our test cars' sensible footwear: both wore 17-inch wheels with 215/55-series tires (the Honda can be optioned up to 18s, the Chrysler as high as 19s). Skillful damping is also a factor. We would mentally brace for the jarring impact when a patch of broken pavement suddenly revealed itself, but then the car would just thump over it, almost as if it were nothing.
The 200's fat-rimmed, leather-wrapped steering wheel (part of the $895 convenience group) felt great, much nicer than the Accord's grained plastic wheel, and the Chrysler steered confidently through rolling hill country. Like Chrysler, Honda uses electric power steering assist, and also like Chrysler, Honda's system is nicely weighted -- much better than most. The Accord is at least 100 pounds lighter than the 200, and it feels a bit livelier in quick transitions. Overall, the Accord's chassis tuning is not only excellent for a general audience but it's also better than most enthusiasts give it credit for -- and the 200's shadows it closely.
Form and function
In their driving dynamics, the 200 and the Accord kept tightly together. Where the two cars diverge is in their design and packaging. The 200 is a sibling -- but not a twin -- to the Dodge Dart, as both are derived from the same architecture, known internally as Compact U.S. Wide (CUSW). Compared with the Dart, the wheelbase for the 200 has been stretched 1.6 inches, to 108 inches. That's still 1.3 inches shy of the Accord's, although the Chrysler is nearly an inch longer overall and also wider.
Size-wise, the two cars are very close, but it is in their packaging that we see the greatest difference. The 200 is out to make a style statement, from its integrated grille and headlights -- the new face of Chrysler, we're told -- to its arc-shaped roofline and pert, ducktail trunk. The Accord is far more upright, sedan-like, and restrained. It's actually a bit trimmer in size than its bloated predecessor, and its rectilinear form makes no pretenses at being a coupe.
Inside, it's the same story. Chrysler has gone for a cockpit-like treatment with a high center console that angles up to meet the dash. Audio and climate controls are at the forward part of the ramp, just ahead of the increasingly voguish dial-a-gear electronic shifter. Unfortunately, the enveloping feel applies not just to the driver but to the passengers as well. Rear-seat space is adequate for a six-footer, but the 200 closes in around you due to its sloping roofline, rising beltline, and thick pillars.
What a contrast to the Accord. The measurements don't show a huge difference between the two, but the Honda feels vastly more spacious. Honda's longtime talent for space efficiency is on display here. Sit in the rear seat, and not only are the front seatbacks far away from your knees, but a six-footer's head doesn't brush the roof and you can easily see outside. The squared-off cabin is as airy as a downtown loft. The windows are large, the pillars are thin, the console is low -- it's a formula that today's auto designers have largely discarded, but one that is absolutely endearing for a car's driver and passengers.
What you pay and what you get
Expect Chrysler to make plenty of noise touting the new 200's full basket of the latest tech toys, but many of them are not available on the Limited model, which is expected to be by far the most popular. The impressive suite of electronics includes adaptive cruise with brake-to-stop, forward collision warning, blind-spot warning, lane departure warning and lane keep assist, rear cross-path detection, and automated parking. Unfortunately, nearly all of them are exclusive to the top-spec 200C (blind-spot warning and cross-path detection can be had on the 200S). Order navigation and you get Chrysler's well-regarded Uconnect 8-inch multifunction touch screen, but it's an option on the 200S and C models only; the Limited makes do with a 5-inch touch screen, but at least it allows you to get an (optional) backup camera. Even without the high-tech features, though, the 200's cabin doesn't come across as stark. The instrument cluster is richly detailed, the cupholders in the console slide back to reveal electronic connectors and additional storage space, and it's all very nicely executed with materials that are definitely a cut above the Dart's.
The Accord's interior is less stylish, and some of its materials are more basic. It does, however, benefit from extremely straightforward switchgear (it is a Honda, after all), and in EX trim it has a bit more standard equipment than the 200 Limited. A backup camera is standard, as is Honda's LaneWatch system, which provides a camera's-eye view back along the right side of the car when the right turn signal is activated; both project onto the 8-inch center screen. A power driver's seat and a sunroof are also standard here, where they cost extra on the 200 Limited.
The Honda has more stuff, but it also costs more. The Accord EX stickers for $26,470, which was also the bottom-line price of our test car. The 200 Limited starts at $24,250, and when optioned up to pretty much match the Accord, our 200's as-tested price was $25,940. Factor in resale value, however -- the Accord's: stellar, the 200's: unproven -- and the Honda is unlikely to be more expensive in the long run.
Putting these two cars together would have been a cruel joke with the last 200, but we're impressed at how well the new 200 fared against what is arguably the best car in the segment. The Accord's combination of virtues -- chiefly its clear packaging advantage along with its better city fuel economy -- better align with the priorities in this segment and put it on top in this match-up. But the stylish Chrysler is going for something slightly different here, and that's probably not a bad idea. "Don't take on your strongest competitor head-on," is another mantra that the 2015 Chrysler 200 seems to be following. That's another sage piece of advice.

2015 Chrysler 200 Limited

Base price $24,250 (including destination)
Price as tested $25,940
Engine 2.4-liter I-4
Horsepower 184 @ 6250 rpm
Torque 173 lb-ft @ 4600 rpm
Transmission 9-speed automatic
Drive Front-wheel
Wheels 17 x 7.5 in
Tires Goodyear Assurance 215/55R-17
Wheelbase 108.0 in
Length x Width x Height 192.3 x 73.6 x 58.7 in
Cargo space 14.5 cu ft
Curb weight 3473 lb
Fuel mileage 23/36 mpg (city/highway)

2014 Honda Accord EX

Base price $26,470 (including destination)
Price as tested $26,470
Engine 2.4-liter I-4
Horsepower 185 @ 6400 rpm
Torque 181 lb-ft @ 3900 rpm
Transmission Continuously variable
Drive Front-wheel
Wheels 17 x 7.5 in
Tires Goodyear Assurance 215/55R-17
Wheelbase 109.3 in
Length x Width x Height 191.4 x 72.8 x 57.7 in
Cargo space 15.8 cu ft
Curb weight 3336 lb
Est. fuel mileage 27/36 mpg (city/highway)
2015 Chrysler 200C Front Three Quarters 02
Healdsburg, California -- We're racing along the Northern California coast in a 2015 Chrysler 200S. Note the verb. Not "plodding," not "touring." Racing. And note the proper noun -- a 2015 Chrysler 200. The ride is decidedly firm. The exhaust pops as we ease off the 295-hp V-6 and onto the brakes, which feel strong and easy to modulate. The electric power steering is heavy and loads up naturally as we turn into another of a seemingly never-ending series of curves.
Styling Unencumbered by European Safety Regulations
Welcome to the new class of American family sedans, which feel neither American nor particularly family-oriented. Like the Ford Fusion, the latest Chrysler 200 exhibits European breeding -- its chassis comes from the Alfa Romeo Giulietta. It also shares with its domestic competitor a coupelike roofline, and it looks a little bit like a Tesla Model S (although this may be more a result of how much the Model S looks like a mid-size sedan). The 200 will be sold only in North America, so Chrysler didn't have to bother meeting global pedestrian-impact regulations. That's how it gets away with a nice, low hood and a grille that's subtle and wide rather than toothy and flat as a billboard. LED taillights are standard; LED headlights (with HID projectors) are optional.
Chrysler will offer the 200 in many trim levels, ranging from a price-leading LX model that rides on steel wheels to the sporty 200S (pictured) and the luxurious 200C, which will compete with the likes of the Lincoln MKZ and the Lexus ES. Like most of its competitors, these trim levels are largely disconnected from the choice of powertrain. The exception is all-wheel drive, which is only offered with the V-6. Chrysler touts its AWD system with its fully disconnecting rear axle for better fuel efficiency by avoiding parasitic losses. You can recognize a so-equipped model by its surprisingly wicked exhaust note. Lead engineer Doug Verley says it's the "happy result" of not having enough room in the center tunnel to fit both a full-size exhaust resonator and all-wheel-drive hardware. There's plenty of bite behind that bark. The normally aspirated 3.6-liter engine delivers its power smoothly at any speed. That's an advantage compared with the somewhat peaky turbo four-cylinders that many competitors now offer in lieu of a V-6.
Pricing Ends Where Lincoln MKZ Begins
The V-6 all-wheel-drive model, which checked in with an eye-watering as-tested price of $34,465, will likely account for a tiny slice of 200 sales. Happily, the four-cylinder model is nearly as entertaining to drive, even though it's predictably slower, with 184 hp and 173 lb-ft of torque. The steering still feels natural, and the handling is still nimble and balanced. Locals courteously pull aside for us on the tighter road sections, surely unaware that they've been chased down by a four-cylinder Chrysler sedan.
All 200s come with a nine-speed automatic transmission. It downshifts roughly around town (Chrysler says a new calibration will address the issue before production). Chrysler expects that 200s with the nine-speed paired with the four-cylinder engine will get 35 mpg on the EPA highway cycle, which is much better than the outgoing model but falls short of the best competitors. The automaker had no city fuel-efficiency estimates as we went to press, but we expect about 21/22 mpg (AWD/FWD) for the V-6 and about 25 mpg for the I-4.
Sporty on the Inside, Too
The interior also looks to sport sedans rather than family sedans for inspiration, mostly to its detriment. Steeply raked roof pillars obstruct outward visibility. There's not a ton of head- or legroom, and high doorsills and a floating center console induce claustrophobia.
The materials are good for a mid-size sedan. Top models feature real wood trim. Even the Limited model we tested (one up from the base model) has soft, nicely grained surfaces. And yet, good for a mid-size sedan still isn't quite good enough to pull off such an intimate design. It's lovely to sit low in a $100,000 Jaguar F-type, ensconced in leather and wood. It's not as pleasant to stare at acres of rubberized plastic in a $30,000 Chrysler. The 200's cabin redeems itself with easy-to-use in-car technology. Chrysler has figured out the perfect combination of touchscreen, buttons, and dials. The shifter, a rotary knob like Jaguar uses, feels just right.
Still, a quick spin in a Honda Accord that Chrysler had on hand for comparison makes painfully clear the compromises that the 200 demands in the name of style.
Those who value outward visibility, comfort, and spaciousness -- traditional hallmarks of an American family sedan -- will want to stick with the Honda.
Those who want an Accord (or a Toyota Camry or a Nissan Altima) will probably buy one regardless of what Chrysler does. Chrysler, like Ford, seems to have embraced the fact that it can't compete with the Japanese stalwarts by copying them. Instead, the 2015 Chrysler 200 should appeal to buyers who want something a bit sportier.

2015 Chrysler 200

ON SALE Mid-2014
BASE PRICE $22,695
AS-TESTED $34,465 (200S, V-6, AWD)
ENGINES 2.4L I-4, 3.6L V-6
POWER 184 hp, 295 hp
TORQUE 173 lb-ft, 262 lb-ft
DRIVE Front- or 4-wheel
WHEELBASE 108.0 in.
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 192.3 x 73.6 x 58.7 in.
CARGO CAPACITY 14.5 cu. ft.
EST. FUEL MILEAGE 25/35 mpg, 22/32 mpg, 21/31 mpg (I-4, V-6 FWD, V-6 AWD)
2015 Chrysler 200
2015 Chrysler 200

New for 2015

The Chrysler 200 is all new for 2015, with fresh styling, a pair of engines, a nine-speed automatic, and available all-wheel drive.

Vehicle Overview

The Chrysler 200 is a midsize sedan available in front- and all-wheel-drive forms, and can be had with a V-6 instead of the standard I-4 engine, with a segment-first nine-speed automatic that’s operated with a rotary shift knob instead of a traditional shift lever. The 200 sits below the 300 as Chrysler’s smaller sedan.

Summary

The 2015 Chrysler 200 can be had with a 2.4-liter I-4 that produces 184 hp and 173 lb-ft of torque, and is paired with a nine-speed automatic that drives the front wheels and powers the new sedan to an EPA rating of 23/36 mpg city/highway. For buyers wanting more power, or perhaps all-wheel drive, a 295-hp 3.6-liter V-6 that produces 262 lb-ft of torque is required, and manages 19/32 mpg in FWD trim, and just 18/29 mpg in AWD trim.

Chrysler has packed lots of technology and goodies into the 200, with a 5- or 8.4-inch infotainment screen using the automaker's Uconnect system, hands-free keyless access with push button or remote start, heated/ventilated front seats, dual-pane sunroof, a rotary shifter for the 9-speed automatic, electronic parking brake, and a rearview camera with dynamic gridlines. The Chrysler features a number of class exclusives, such as adaptive cruise control with stop and go functionality, forward collision warning with active braking, park assist with parallel and perpendicular space capability, and an available AWD system on the V-6 model.
The 2015 Chrysler 200 earns a five-star overall safety rating from the NHTSA (out of a possible five stars), and is considered a 2015 Top Safety Pick+ by the IIHS.

What We Think

The 2015 Chrysler 200 can’t help but look like a hero after the Chrysler Sebring/200 it replaces. Despite the rental-lot roots of its predecessor, the new Chrysler 200 is a decent midsize sedan. In a Driven review we noted the V-6 models were surprisingly sporty: “You can recognize a so-equipped model by its surprisingly wicked exhaust note. Lead engineer Doug Verley says it's the ‘happy result’ of not having enough room in the center tunnel to fit both a full-size exhaust resonator and all-wheel-drive hardware. There's plenty of bite behind that bark. The naturally aspirated 3.6-liter engine delivers its power smoothly at any speed. That's an advantage compared with the somewhat peaky turbo four-cylinders that many competitors now offer in lieu of a V-6.” Inside the new 200, the pleasant surprises continue:
“The materials are good for a mid-size sedan. Top models feature real wood trim. Even the Limited model we tested (one up from the base model) has soft, nicely grained surfaces. And yet, good for a mid-size sedan still isn't quite good enough to pull off such an intimate design. It's lovely to sit low in a $100,000 Jaguar F-Type, ensconced in leather and wood. It's not as pleasant to stare at acres of rubberized plastic in a $30,000 Chrysler. The 200's cabin redeems itself with easy-to-use in-car technology. Chrysler has figured out the perfect combination of touchscreen, buttons, and dials. The shifter, a rotary knob like Jaguar uses, feels just right.”
In another Driven review, we compared the 2015 Chrysler 200 with a 2014 Honda Accord, noting that “the Accord's combination of virtues -- chiefly its clear packaging advantage along with its better city fuel economy -- better align with the priorities in this segment and put it on top in this match-up. But the stylish Chrysler is going for something slightly different here, and that's probably not a bad idea.” For a vehicle that went from the bottom of the segment to somewhere near the front, the Chrysler 200 has significant progress. All the changes won’t likely cause Honda or Toyota executives to lose any sleep, but unlike the last-generation Chrysler midsize sedan, the new 200 is built for more than just rental lots.

You’ll Like

  • Much improved over previous generation
  • Many class-exclusive features
  • Handsome styling

You Won’t Like

  • Engine stop-start system isn’t the smoothest out there
  • Back seat not the most spacious in the segment
  • I-4 model's city fuel economy

Key Competitors

  • Honda Accord
  • Nissan Altima
  • Toyota Camry
  • Chevrolet Malibu
  • Ford Fusion

Rating

4
2015 Chrysler 200 Ad Screenshot 01
A new ad campaign for the 2015 Chrysler 200 attempts to break automotive stereotypes by suggesting that this Michigan-built midsize sedan is fully capable of going toe-to-toe with rivals from around the world. Three of the four “Ready to Take on the World” ads debuted last weekend, and the fourth will follow in November.
2015 Chrysler 200C Homepage
The redesigned 2015 Chrysler 200 features a long list of new safety technology thathelped earn the model a 5-Star Overall Safety Rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The Chrysler 200's high marks in NHTSA's tests mirror those awarded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), which named the sedan a Top Safety Pick+ earlier this year.
2015 Chrysler 200 Assembly Plant Virtual Tour Front View
Chrysler wishes everyone could visit its Sterling Heights Assembly plant to experience the manufacturing process behind the 2015 Chrysler 200, but since it can't take people to the plant, it decided to bring the plant to the people instead with a virtual tour.
2015 Chrysler 200 IIHS Small Overlap Frontal Test Crash
The 2015 Chrysler 200 midsize sedan is the first-ever Chrysler Group model to receive the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s highest Top Safety Pick + rating. While the previous-generation Chrysler 200 was already a standard Top Safety Pick winner, the new car’s optional forward collision warning system makes it eligible for the TSP+ rating.

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$21,610
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$21,995
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2015 Chrysler 200
2015 Chrysler 200
LX FWD 4-Dr Sedan I4
23 MPG City | 36 MPG Hwy
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2015 Chrysler 200
2015 Chrysler 200
LX FWD 4-Dr Sedan I4
$21,995
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2015 Chrysler 200
2015 Chrysler 200
LX FWD 4-Dr Sedan I4
184hp
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2015 Chrysler 200 Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
2.4L I4Engine
Fuel economy City:
23 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
36 MPG
Horsepower:
184 hp @ 6250rpm
Torque:
173 ft lb of torque @ 4600rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats (optional)
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential (optional)
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player (optional)
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation (optional)
Vehicle
36,000 miles / 36 months
Powertrain
100,000 miles / 60 months
Corrosion
100,000 miles / 60 months
Roadside
100,000 miles / 60 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
SUSPENSION:REAR:SHOCK ABSORBER
Summary
Chrysler Group LLC (Chrysler) is recalling certain model year 2014 Jeep Cherokee and Ram 1500 and 2015 Chrysler 200 vehicles. Due to an insufficient weld, the rear shocks may detach from the vehicle at one end and possibly damage other chassis components, the tire or result in reduced braking.
Consequences
Damage to the tire or reduced braking increases the risk of a vehicle crash.
Remedy
Chrysler will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the rear shocks and replace any affected ones, free of charge. Owners may contact Chrysler customer service at 1-800-853-1403. Chrysler's number for this recall is P37.
Potential Units Affected
15,956
Notes
Chrysler Group LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:WIRING
Summary
Chrysler Group LLC (Chrysler) is recalling certain model year 2015 Chrysler 200 vehicles manufactured May 19, 2014, to June 21, 2014. The affected vehicles may have been built with a driver side door wiring harness of an insufficient wire gauge, resulting in excessive heat which may melt the wiring insulation.
Consequences
Excessive heat and melting wiring insulation may result in an electrical short, increasing the risk of a fire.
Remedy
Chrysler will notify owners, and dealers will replace the door wiring harness, free of charge. The recall began on October 3, 2014. Owners may contact Chrysler customer service at 1-800-853-1403. Chrysler's number for this recall is P43.
Potential Units Affected
8
Notes
Chrysler Group LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:50
Component
POWER TRAIN:AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
Summary
Chrysler (FCA US LLC) is recalling certain model year 2015 Chrysler 200 vehicles manufactured March 9, 2014, to December 15, 2014, and equipped with a 9-speed automatic transmission. The automatic transmission parking pawl may become contaminated or the park rod may become dislodged or broken. This may prevent the transmission from shifting into the Park position.
Consequences
If the shift indicator displays "Park" but the park lock does not engage, the vehicle may roll away increasing the risk of a crash.
Remedy
Chrysler will notify owners, and dealers inspect the transmission. Any transmission found with contamination or a park rod will be replaced, free of charge. The recall began April 9, 2015. Owners may contact Chrysler customer service at 1-800-853-1403. Chrysler's number for this recall is R08.
Potential Units Affected
21,465
Notes
Chrysler (FCA US LLC)


NHTSA Rating Front Driver
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Front Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Overall
Not Rated
NHTSA Rating Rollover
Not Rated
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
Good
IIHS Overall Side Crash
Good
IIHS Best Pick
1
IIHS Rear Crash
Good
IIHS Roof Strength
Good
IIHS Front Small Overlap
Good

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2015 Chrysler 200

Depreciation
40.8%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$14,409
40.8%
Insurance
$7,065
20%
Fuel Cost
$8,354
23.6%
Financing
$2,304
6.5%
Maintenance
$2,273
6.4%
Repair Costs
$555
1.6%
State Fees
$375
1.1%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $35,335 What's This?
Value Rating: Poor