2013 Chevrolet Camaro

LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6 man trans

2013 chevrolet camaro Reviews and News

2013 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Vs 2013 Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE Front View 2
At times, the Mustang versus Camaro storyline is as sophisticated as The Itchy and Scratchy Show, the television-show-within-a-television-show created for Matt Groening's jaundiced, cartoon American family. While these two pony cars take turns playing tireless cat or ruthless mouse, one thing remains constant: they fight (They fight. They fight, they fight, they fight. Fight, fight, fight! Fight, fight, fight!) with little purpose other than antagonizing the other or settling the score.
A recap from previous episodes: Ford finds a large audience for a retro-styled pony car, Chevrolet builds a retro-styled Camaro. Ford finally drums up some decent engines for the Mustang, Chevrolet gives the V-6 Camaro an 8-hp bump without touching the engine. Chevrolet builds a high-tech masterpiece that's more sports car than muscle car, Ford throws down the most powerful production V-8 engine and a 200-mph top speed.
We've already refereed two rounds of this tit-for-tat squabble and picked winners on both sides. If you're buying for cheap performance with a run-of-the-mill V-6 or V-8 model, 'Stang beats Camaro. If you have the scratch for a Porsche and the discerning tastes of a newly licensed teenager, we rank the Camaro ZL1 ahead of Ford's Shelby GT500. But the greatest pony car of them all has claimed its title without using a single stick of cartoon dynamite. The Ford Mustang Boss 302 delivers a level of driver involvement that's not just unmatched among 1960s-styled two-doors; it's among the best in the wider world of cars. And since it's positioned between the Mustang GT and the Shelby GT500, the Boss occupies a space that Chevrolet hasn't contested.
Until now.

The Camaro's counterattack

And so we have yet another episode of The Camaro and Mustang Show. Same characters, same conflict, new antics. Given the history between these two, it's no surprise that Chevy wouldn't lie still while Ford pushed its pot of skin-melting acid into position. Instead, the engineers at GM readied their own attack, sharpening the handling and strengthening the drivetrain of the Camaro SS with the 1LE. Their answer isn't a unique model like the Boss, but rather an optional equipment package that can be added to manual-transmission SS models. 1LE cars pack the same 426-hp, 6.2-liter V-8 found in the SS but add larger anti-roll bars, stiffer dampers, a close-ratio gearbox, a shorter final drive, a strut-tower brace, a transmission cooler, and stickier tires. At face value, the changes suggest incremental improvements in handling and acceleration, but when driven, the 1LE reveals a much more significant transformation.
Perhaps that shouldn't come as a surprise, since engineers worked backward from the divine $54,995 Camaro ZL1, transferring both knowledge and a few parts to the 1LE. Most noticeably, the ZL1's front tires -- 285/35ZR-20 Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar G:2s -- are used at all four corners of the 1LE with profound effect. The ultra-high-performance summer tires offer gobs of grip while the identical sizes front and rear reduce the Camaro's proclivity for understeer. With equal credit going to the revised suspension, high-g cornering in the 1LE bears little resemblance to that of the 2011 Camaro SS. That car rolled, wallowed, understeered, and generally disappointed when it was flogged around the track. Winning our respect back, the 1LE remains surprisingly flat in corners with less body roll and more front-end grip than the Boss Mustang. And while the suspension changes keep understeer at bay, neither is the 1LE an oversteering lunatic. This Camaro can be pitched, chucked, and hurled into corners with reckless abandon and it remains a well-behaved, easily controlled pony.
All SS models adopt electric power steering for 2013, a welcome change over the dull hydraulic setup of last year's car. The Camaro now steers with sharper on-center response and more immediate turn-in (thank those tires again), though there is room for improvement. With less weight in the nose than the ZL1, the 1LE has a feeling of lightness in the steering wheel that weakens the connection between driver and road. In all, the tidier steering and handling of the 1LE package shrinks the Camaro -- at least in terms of perception. The 1LE feels smaller than a regular SS on the track, yet not as nimble as the Mustang. The 1LE is still haunted by tortured sight lines and its inescapable 3860-pound weight.
While the small-block V-8 makes the same 426 hp and 420 lb-ft of torque as the SS, the 1LE accelerates more quickly thanks to a new transmission that puts first through fourth gears closer together and a shorter final-drive ratio. That gearbox also includes a new shifter -- borrowed from the ZL1 -- with slightly longer throws and a nicely shaped shift knob. The Camaro's powertrain is hardy and robust, yet tamer and calmer than the Boss's unruly 5.0-liter. To get closer to the Mustang's bad-boy attitude, every 1LE buyer will want to make sure their car is equipped with the $895 active exhaust for a deeper, louder note on startup and under hard acceleration.

Who's the Boss?

In contrast to the Camaro's traditional torquey V-8, the Mustang is a hopped-up screamer, spinning 1100 rpm higher and hitting its 444-hp peak at 7400 rpm. Don't expect any apologies that the 1LE has 40 lb-ft of torque on the Boss, though. Power delivery is linear and precise and the Mustang has character and personality that go far deeper than the Camaro. The 5.0-liter lopes at idle, snorts at tip-in, and thunders under full throttle. And when you remove the restrictor plates from the side-exit exhaust pipes, the effects are even more intoxicating. Chevy's active exhaust system politely turns down the volume when you're cruising, and we'd caution that the Boss's amplified gurgle could get annoying on the highway -- if it didn't sound so damn good.
The Mustang's gearing is even more aggressive than the Camaro's, bringing the mixed blessing of more frequent shifting. The stiff and tight shifter looks cool and it's fun to strong-arm a fast upshift on the street. The flip side is that you'll be busier on the track and the claustrophobic gate spacing makes for cumbersome downshifts when you're in a hurry. The Camaro's shifter, with more space between gates, is far friendlier. We do appreciate the Mustang's superior visibility and the optional Recaro buckets that hold you firmly through high-speed sweepers. Unfortunately, these ergonomic advantages are negated by the nontelescoping steering wheel, which puts taller drivers uncomfortably close to the dashboard.
That's too bad, because the connection between driver and car is otherwise uncanny in the Boss 302. Handling is predictable but hardly conservative. The rear end is quite loose and the front tires will push to the outside of a corner if they aren't coaxed into a turn. These could be negatives, but the Boss communicates so clearly to the driver through the vibrations in the seat, the quiet squeal of the tires, and the heft of the steering wheel that it's easy to toe the limit of traction without feeling like you're going to lose it. The Pirelli PZero tires aren't quite as sticky as the 1LE's Goodyears and the Boss's edgier handling requires you to exercise the brakes harder to set up for corner entry. And even when you're not lapping as fast as the 1LE, you'll find yourself working more to get a clean lap. So while the Camaro is the faster car around a road course, the Boss is the more engaging and entertaining car. It's a challenge to drive perfectly and a riot to drive with the rear tires billowing smoke.

A matter of heart over head.

As different as these two cars are, this showdown is as close as it comes to a stalemate. All rational thinking puts the Camaro ahead of the Mustang. In addition to being the faster car, it's also significantly cheaper than the Boss. As a $3500 option on top of the SS's $33,535 starting price, the 1LE undercuts the Boss by a whopping $5960. Yet while you're turning faster laps in the 1LE, you'll be yearning for the involvement and the specialness of the Mustang. Everything that the Camaro package addresses -- body roll, gearing, and handling behavior -- were complaints we had about the SS back in 2010. The 1LE package comes off as a fix for what was broken rather than improving on an already excellent car. That's what the Boss 302 does.
The raucous Mustang installs itself in your subconscious with the viciousness of a drug addiction. Despite knowing there's an objectively better alternative with a Chevy badge, we are lured back to the Boss again and again. Its responsive chassis, competent handling, and brawny engine strike us in a psychological weak spot where emotions overrule sensibilities. We'd never question someone for making the rational choice of a Camaro SS 1LE, but reason be damned, the Boss 302 is the car we want.

2013 Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE

Base price: $37,035
Price as tested: $37,930
POWERTRAIN
Engine:
16-valve OHV V-8
Displacement: 6.2 liters (376 cu in)
Power: 426 hp @ 5900 rpm
Torque: 420 lb-ft @ 4600 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Drive: Rear-wheel
CHASSIS
Steering:
Electrically assisted
Suspension, front: Strut-type, coil springs
Suspension, rear: Multilink, coil springs
Brakes: Vented discs, ABS
Tires: Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar G:2
Tires: 285/35ZR-20
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H:
190.4 x 75.5 x 54.2 in
Wheelbase: 112.3 in
Track F/R: 63.7/63.7 in
Weight: 3860 lb
Weight dist. F/R: 52/48%
EPA Mileage: 16/24 mpg (city/highway)

2013 Ford Mustang Boss 302

Base price: $42,995
Price as tested: $43,100
POWERTRAIN
Engine:
32-valve DOHC V-8
Displacement: 5.0 liters (302 cu in)
Power: 444 hp @ 7400 rpm
Torque: 380 lb-ft @ 4500 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Drive: Rear-wheel
CHASSIS
Steering:
Electrically assisted
Suspension, front: Strut-type, coil springs
Suspension, rear: Live axle, coil springs
Brakes: Vented discs, ABS
Tires: Pirelli PZero
Tires F, R: 255/40ZR-19, 285/35ZR-19
MEASUREMENTS
L x W x H:
107.1 x 73.9 x 55.1 in
Wheelbase: 107.1 in
Track F/R: 61.9/62.5 in
Weight: 3632 lb
Weight dist. F/R: 55/45%
EPA Mileage: 17/26 mpg (city/highway)
2013 Chevrolet Camaro 1LE Front Three Quarters In Motion 2
The best and worst thing about the fifth-generation Camaro is that it genuinely is a concept car. "That's been our driving theme for both the coupe and convertible: execute it to look exactly like the concept car," Camaro chief engineer Al Oppenheiser told us back in 2010. Three years of strong, growing sales have validated this approach. The only problem is that the Camaro also drives a lot like a concept car. Beyond the bad sight lines and bottleneck trunk opening, we've consistently complained about the softball-sized shifter, the hard-to-read gauges, and the enormous deep-dish steering wheel -- all details that looked cool on the floor of Detroit's Cobo Hall but don't translate to the street. When we took a 2010 Camaro SS to the track, its high curb weight, tall gearing, and tendency to understeer at the limit furthered our impression that the car, though certainly fast and capable, was meant more for cruising and looking good than satisfying the most demanding drivers.
Fortunately, the Camaro's engineering team is itself comprised of many demanding drivers, and they weren't quite satisfied, either. The most sensational result of their efforts debuted earlier this year in the form of the ZL1, which we tested and called "the most rewarding Camaro ever." The even better news, especially for those who can't pony up $55,000 for a pony car, is that many of its dynamic improvements have trickled down to a new option package for the SS called the 1LE.
"While we were doing the ZL1 we stopped along the way with the SS," Oppenheiser says.
The 1LE package is named after a showroom-stock racing version of the Camaro available from 1989 to 1992. Available as a $3500 option on the 2013 Camaro SS, it includes larger antiroll bars, retuned dampers, a unique six-speed manual transmission with more closely spaced ratios in gears one through four, a numerically higher rear axle ratio, and lighter wheels borrowed from the ZL1. These changes are in addition to the mid-cycle enhancements that have graced all V-8 Camaros, including electric power steering (developed for the ZL1 to improve feel at higher speeds), a smaller steering wheel (a late 2012 change that filtered into all Camaros) and, on coupes, revised rear-suspension geometry that mitigates understeer (part of the FE4 suspension package). Active exhausts, which bypass baffles in the mufflers at idle and under hard throttle, are finally available as an option on all SS Camaros.
These improvements don't sound very impressive individually, especially when you remember that the ZL1 needs magnetorheological dampers, unique aerodynamics, and a supercharged V-8 to achieve its ends. (It's the lack of any engine modifications, we're told, that deemed the 1LE unworthy of the Camaro's more famous track designation -- Z/28.) But it's actually the minute, attentive nature of these changes that impress us most as we push the 1LE through the familiar turns of Gingerman Raceway in South Haven, Michigan. The suede, flat-bottomed wheel fits comfortably in our grip, as does the smaller shift knob. The gauges are easier to read thanks to a new font, and the tachometer now has a clearer redline marking. A new frameless mirror not only looks cool -- it's patterned after the one on Oppenheiser's '68 convertible -- but it also provides a bit more forward visibility in a car where every extra millimeter of unobstructed glass counts.
The 1LE forgoes the staggered tire setup found on other V-8 Camaros -- it uses the ZL1's front Goodyear Supercar G2 tires on all four wheels. That, combined with a much stiffer rear suspension, defeats the SS's understeer problem. Turn in is much sharper than we remember, and the back end now rotates obediently if you trail the brakes entering a turn, even if you leave stability control on in competition mode, as we did.
The changes haven't come at the expense of what we originally liked about the Camaro. The 426-hp LS3 V-8 is so flexible that, even with the shorter gearing, we're able to navigate the entire track in third gear. The Brembo brakes, also unchanged, endure the task of decelerating this 3860 pound car. (Chevy prepared our test car by pouring in racing-specific brake fluid with a higher boiling point and recommends owners do the same before heading out to the track.) And though the rear tires slide much more readily, they never feel like they are going to suddenly snap loose.
Most of all, the Camaro still looks very cool, even if we're not entirely partial to the 1LE's matte-black hood. Six years after the Camaro concept wowed auto show crowds, styling remains the car's salient selling point, one for which you'll need to sacrifice outward visibility and any hope of packing that large roller suitcase. But the tweaks the Camaro team has made across the line and to the 1LE in particular subtly change the character of the car. Much like a stiff new pair of jeans conforms to your body over time, the once all-show Camaro now feels as if it's been finessed to fit the needs of people who like to drive fast.
P.S.: We realize there's a word we've failed to include in this review: Boss. Rest assured, we have not forgotten that there also happens to be a track-tuned Ford Mustang. Stay tuned to read how it compares with the new 1LE.
On sale: Now
Price: $$37,035
Engine: 6.2L V-8, 426 hp, 420 lb-ft
EPA fuel economy: 16/24 mpg
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro

New For 2013

The Camaro LS, LT, and SS get new eighteen- and twenty-inch wheel designs, standard hill-start assist, and a ZL1-style shift knob on manual-equipped models. The SS can now be equipped with a dual-mode exhaust and the 1LE performance package. All V-8 models receive electric steering, revised rear suspension geometry, and a smaller steering wheel. The ZL1 is now available as a convertible.

Overview

Now in its third year, the Camaro is one of the most attractive vehicles to come out of the retro-design craze that swept through the industry in the past decade. Its taut, sleek body and muscular stance manage to evoke forty years of Camaro history yet look thoroughly modern. Unfortunately, it looks better than it performs; numb steering and a hefty curb weight mean that the Camaro is more of a Sunday cruiser than a corner carver. The ZL1 coupe and the new-for-2013 convertible help legitimize GM’s pony car somewhat. Both are motivated by a 580-hp, 6.2-liter supercharged V-8 mated to a six-speed manual shifter or an optional six-speed automatic. They come with standard performance features such as magnetorheological dampers, the Performance Traction Management system from the Corvette ZR1, and 20-inch Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar G:2 tires. The Camaro SS—now with electric steering—can be fitted with the new 1LE package that adds a full range of performance add-ons, including larger antiroll bars and retuned dampers. Unfortunately, the interior is a mixed bag. The overall look is fairly convincing, but inconsistent fit and finish and some clumsy ergonomics lag behind the competition. Despite that, if you are looking for style with heritage and tons of street presence, nothing in this class does it better than the Camaro.

Safety

Front, side, and side curtain air bags are standard, along with ABS, traction and stability control, and a tire-pressure monitoring system. A backup camera and rear-mounted parking sensors are optional.

You'll like:

  • 1LE performance package
  • ZL1 nudges Corvette

You won't like:

  • Heavy
  • Interior quality and style

Key Competitors For The 2013 Chevrolet Camaro

  • Dodge Challenger
  • Ford Mustang
  • Hyundai Genesis coupe
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This week's Rumors Video Roundup goes around the world, from Evo's look at the Ford Fiesta rally car, to Motor Trend's acoustic version of the World's Greatest Drag Race, and Arthur St. Antoine going for an Epic Drive in a Lamborghini Aventador Roadster.
Scott Settlemire Cropped
In the real world, Scott Settlemire is a midlevel, fifty-nine-year-old General Motors lifer who manages auto shows.
Chevrolet Camaro Turbo Movie Car Front View
A modified Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 will star in one of the summer's upcoming animated movies, "Turbo." In this new video, Chevrolet representatives discuss the car and what it means for the new DreamWorks movie.
2013 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 On Worlds Fastest Car Show Image 3
After drifting a 2013 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 through an empty parking garage, racer Justin Bell heads to the race track to stretch the Inferno Orange muscle car's legs.
Tesla Model S Kindergarten Class Frunk
This week's Rumors Video Roundup has a little something for everyone. If you're a Francophile, we have a zany ad from Peugeot's Brazilian agency pitting the 208 against some unusual rivals, the Tesla Model S's performance gets measured both at the track and in kindergarten, and archrivals Ferrari and Porsche duke it out at, where else? The Nürburgring.

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Certified Pre-Owned 2013 Chevrolet Camaro Pricing

Certified Pre Owned Price
$20,250

Used 2013 Chevrolet Camaro Values / Pricing

Suggested Retail Price
$23,345

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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
19 MPG City | 30 MPG Hwy
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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
19 MPG City | 30 MPG Hwy
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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
$23,345
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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
323hp
Top Ranking Vehicles - Horsepower
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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
2013 Chevrolet Camaro
LS RWD 2-Dr Coupe V6
323hp

2013 Chevrolet Camaro Specifications

Quick Glance:
Engine
3.6L V6Engine
Fuel economy City:
17 MPG
Fuel economy Highway:
28 MPG
Horsepower:
323 hp @ 6800rpm
Torque:
278 ft lb of torque @ 4800rpm
  • Air Conditioning
  • Power Windows
  • Power Locks
  • Power Seats
  • Steering Wheel Tilt
  • Cruise Control
  • Sunroof (optional)
  • ABS
  • Stabilizer Front
  • Stabilizer RearABS
  • Electronic Traction Control
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Locking Differential (optional)
  • Limited Slip Differential
  • Airbag Driver
  • Airbag Passenger
  • Airbag Side Front
  • Airbag Side Rear (optional)
  • Radio
  • CD Player
  • CD Changer (optional)
  • DVD (optional)
  • Navigation
Vehicle
36,000 miles / 36 months
Powertrain
100,000 miles / 60 months
Corrosion
100,000 miles / 72 months
Roadside
100,000 miles / 60 months
Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:30
Component
EQUIPMENT:OTHER:LABELS
Summary
General Motors (GM) is recalling certain model year 2013 and 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Coupes manufactured June 9, 2013, through September 6, 2013. In the affected vehicles, the required air bag warning label on the sun visor may peel off. Thus, these vehicles fail to comply to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 208 "Occupant Crash Protection."
Consequences
If the air bag warning label detaches from the visor, the driver and front seat passenger may not be warned of the risks of air bag deployment, increasing the risk of injury in the event of a crash.
Remedy
GM will notify owners, and instruct owners how to inspect the visor sticker. As necessary, dealers will replace the sun visor, free of charge. The recall began on October 28, 2013. Owners may contact GM at 1-800-521-7300. GM's recall campaign number is 13284.
Potential Units Affected
18,941
Notes
General Motors LLC


Recall Date
12-31-1969:21:35:40
Component
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:IGNITION
Summary
General Motors LLC (GM) is recalling all 2010-2014 Chevrolet Camaro vehicles manufactured December 3, 2008 to May 23, 2014. In the affected vehicles, the driver may accidentally hit the ignition key with their knee, unintentionally knocking the key out of the run position, turning off the engine.
Consequences
If the key is not in the run position, the air bags may not deploy if the vehicle is involved in a crash, increasing the risk of injury. Additionally, a key knocked out of the run position could cause loss of engine power, power steering, and power braking, increasing the risk of a vehicle crash.
Remedy
GM will notify owners, and dealers will remove the key blade from the original flip key/RKE transmitter assemblies, and provide two new keys and two key rings per key. The recall began August 25, 2014. Owners may contact Chevrolet customer service at 1-800-222-1020. GM's number for this recall is 14294. Note: Until the recall has been performed, it is very important that drivers adjust their seat and steering column to allow clearance between their knee and the ignition key.
Potential Units Affected
464,712
Notes
General Motors LLC


IIHS Front Small Overlap
N/R
NHTSA Rating Front Driver
5
NHTSA Rating Front Passenger
5
NHTSA Rating Front Side
5
NHTSA Rating Rear Side
5
NHTSA Rating Overall
5
NHTSA Rating Rollover
5
IIHS Front Moderate Overlap
N/R
IIHS Overall Side Crash
N/R
IIHS Rear Crash
N/R
IIHS Roof Strength
N/R

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5-Year Total Cost to Own For The 2013 Chevrolet Camaro

Depreciation
19.6%
Loss in Value + Expenses
= 5 Year Cost to Own
Depreciation
$6,272
19.6%
Insurance
$6,750
21.1%
Fuel Cost
$11,730
36.7%
Financing
$2,149
6.7%
Maintenance
$3,618
11.3%
Repair Costs
$1,052
3.3%
State Fees
$390
1.2%
Five Year Cost of Ownership: $31,961 What's This?
Value Rating: Average